Category Archives: population genetics

R.J. “Sam” Berry, 1934-2018

by Greg Mayer Robert James ‘Sam’ Berry, Emeritus Professor of Genetics in the Genetics, Evolution and Environment Department at University College London, died on March 29 of this year, following a stroke the previous summer. For decades, Berry had been a major figure in population and ecological genetics.  Announcing his death on the UCL website, […]

Richard Levins, 1930-2016

by Greg Mayer Richard ‘Dick’ Levins, the John Rock Professor of Population Sciences at the Harvard School of Public Health, died on January 19 of this year. He was one of the most influential population biologists of the 20th century, and a close colleague and associate of Dick Lewontin, Jerry’s doctoral advisor. Levins was an […]

Will Provine died

I’m saddened to report that historian of science and population geneticist Will Provine, a professor at Cornell, died on September 1 at 73.  His wife has posted an unbearably sad memoriam on her Facebook page, and Casey Bergman, one of our Chicago Ph.D. students and now a professor at Manchester, reported the news on his website An […]

Exclusive pictures: the Crafoord Prize in Biosciences

On January 15 I announced that the prestigious Crafoord Prize in Biosciences was awarded jointly to my Ph.D. advisor Dick Lewontin and Tomoka Ohta for their work on genetic variation in natural populations. (See the press release here.) I am pleased to present the photographs of the May 6 ceremony in Stockholm, in which the King of […]

Our letter to the New York Times criticizing Nicholas Wade’s book on race

Sunday’s New York Times Book Review (already up) features a letter signed by 139 population geneticists, including myself. It is, in essence, a group of scientists objecting en masse to Nicholas Wade’s shoddy treatment of race and evolution in his new book A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race, and Human History.  The book was about the genetics of ethnic […]