Category Archives: evolution

Nice BBC show on science communication; Dawkins and Deborah Kelemen talk about evolution

I’m just going to steal reader Colin’s email, which called my attention to a 42-minute BBC4 program featuring several people, although, as usual, Richard Dawkins gets top billing (see screenshot below). I’ve just listened to the show and recommend it. Here’s what Colin wrote me: The program is now be available here. It discusses with Richard […]

Glen Loury interviews Bret Weinstein

Two days ago, Glen Loury, a professor of social sciences at Brown University,  had a conversation with Bret Weinstein on Bloggingheads tv, and it’s just appeared on YouTube. Weinstein, you may recall, is the professor of evolutionary biology at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington who refused to leave campus on the Day of Departure […]

The origin and migration of domestic cats: a genetic study

I think about fifty people sent me articles about a new genetic study of domestic cats and their ancestor, Felis silvestris—an analysis published in a paper in Nature Ecology & Evolution by Claudio Ottoni et al. Thanks to all for calling this to my attention, as it combines two of my favorite subjects, cats and genetics; but […]

You have vestigial muscles that moved the whiskers of your ancestors

This is the kind of post I envisioned writing—once every few weeks or so—when I started this website. My intention was to use the site to publicize new evidence for evolution. Not that we need any to show that that well evidenced theory is true, of course, but to support the book and alert people […]

A new paper defends the Modern Evolutionary Synthesis against the buzzword purveyors

There’s a movement afoot by money-hungry but misguided scientists to claim that the Modern Synthesis (MS) of evolutionary biology is fatally flawed. (Many of these researchers are funded by the John Templeton Foundation, which recently handed out $11 million dollars for work on this fruitless endeavor.) According to the critics, the areas that supposedly have […]

Artificial selection in action: more elephants are being born without tusks

What do you expect if hunters or poachers selectively kill elephants with big tusks—either for trophies or their ivory? This is actually a form of artificial selection, and it will have the expected results: elephants with smaller tusks will be more likely to survive and reproduce, and if there’s genetic variation for tusk size or […]

Two remarkable cases of mimicry

Both of these cases were found by Matthew Cobb on Twi**er, and I’ve enlarged the photos at the bottom: A pile of broken sticks: 2 Buff-tip Moths. NW Worcestershire, 27 May 2017. #teammoth pic.twitter.com/XewN1qeBBl — Moths & Mothing (@j_sparey) May 28, 2017 and Leaf Katydid (Phyllomimus sp., Pseudophyllinae, Tettigoniidae)https://t.co/wsKV1K1pkn #insect #China #itchydogimages #entomology pic.twitter.com/6iDP96h9nN — […]

On the way home: discussion with Dawkins

I’m cooling my heels at R*agan Airport in DC, which I’d prefer to call National Airport, its old name. I’ll be home about noon Chicago time. You may remember the first bit of this post’s title as a Beatles song; if you also remember the album it was on, you get extra credit. The event […]

Is creationism on the wane in America?

Every year or two since 1982, the Gallup Poll has surveyed Americans for their attitudes toward human evolution. (Note: it’s not evolution in general that’s surveyed by the question below, but human evolution. It’s entirely possible that more Americans would accept evolution in general if it’s construed as applying to all species except humans—in fact, that’s […]

Free article on the Scopes Trial

Scientific American recently made its January, 1959 issue available free to the public, but you have to go through a complex procedure of registering, ordering it for $ 0.00, and then downloading it when your order is accepted. Reader Barry has done the work for us and sent me a pdf of the issue. The […]