Category Archives: book reviews

Pinker on the science “wars”, identity politics, and his new book

Steve is doing a full-court press publicizing his new book, Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress, which has now risen to #10 on Amazon.  And this publicity is exactly what I’d be doing if I had his renown and intellectual chops. At any rate, I’ll call your attention to three news […]

Pinker’s new book out tomorrow, previewed in the Guardian and the WSJ

Yes, tomorrow is the release of Steve Pinker’s new book , Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason Science, Humanism, and Progress, which is already at #48 on Amazon. I gave a preview of it here, noting that Bill Gates called it “my new favorite book of all time,” replacing Steve’s earlier book, The Better Angels of our […]

My WaPo review of A. N. Wilson’s Darwin biography

The new Washington Post “Outlook” section has on the cover my review of A. N. Wilson’s new biography, Charles Darwin: Victorian Mythmaker.  I panned the book, for it was dreadful on both the historical (biographical) and scientific fronts. You can read my take by clicking on the screenshots below: I’ll give just the last two paragraphs; […]

Templeton-funded researcher defends Templeton Foundation and its call for “dialogue” between science and religion

In the new issue of the Los Angeles Review of Books (link below), Peter Harrison, in a piece called “From conflict to dialogue and all the way back“, purports to review Yves Gingras’s recent book on science and religion, a book whose thesis is that no useful dialogue is possible between science and religion. Harrison is […]

Don’t know your past, don’t know your future

by Greg Mayer My friend and colleague Jon Losos has recently published a book, Improbable Destinies: Fate, Chance, and the Future of Evolution (Riverhead Books, New York) that will be of considerable interest to WEIT readers. The main question addressed by the book is this: To what extent is the course of evolution predictable? And, […]

Five Books: Robert McCrum’s list of the best novels in English

Over at Five Books, writer and journalist John Robert McCrum (also an associate editor of The Observer) has compiled a list of his Five Best Novels in English, and also makes some thoughtful remarks about other novels and the genre in general. (The interviewer is my friend Sophie Roell, whose questions to McCrum are in bold.) […]

Robert Sapolsky takes on free will in “Behave”

I wasn’t able to finish Robert Sapolsky’s relatively new book, Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst, for two reasons. First, I found the opening several hundred pages pretty boring. Despite Sapolsky’s valiant attempt to write engagingly—and he can do so in places—the material was a tedious disquisition on hormones, neurons, and other material […]

Reza Aslan’s new book, in which he becomes a pantheist

Reza Aslan’s new book, God: A Human History, came out five days ago. Click on the screenshot to go to the Amazon page: Curiously, despite Aslan’s recent television series, Believer, the book doesn’t seem to be garnering a lot of attention—or praise. (But perhaps that’s because his series was dreadful and got canceled.) The book got […]

Favorite fiction of the last 200 years

I was talking to my friend Tim last night, and told him I’d come upon a Guardian list of novels that everyone should have read before leaving college, and that the list included Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (seriously?) as well as Lord of the Rings (a good and entertaining read, but not nearly as […]

Evolution-dissing, teoleogical, Templeton-funded book gets a star on Kirkus

A book called Purpose and Desire: What Makes Something “Alive” and Why Modern Darwinism has Failed to Explain it“, by J. Scott Turner, came out September 12, published by HarperOne.  It hasn’t sold very well, despite Amazon recommendations by Intelligent Design advocates and Discovery Institute members Douglas Axe and Stephen Meyer and, amazingly, a starred […]