Category Archives: Accommodationism

Fulsome accommodationism in the journal Nature

I don’t know what’s going on with Science and Nature—perhaps the two most prestigious science journals in the world—but both are increasingly catering, if not pandering, to religion. Science and its sponsoring organization the AAAS have a program, funded by Templeton, to increase dialogue between science and religion, and the AAAS has faith-themed events at its annual meeting. […]

Freeman Dyson’s natural theology: The human brain can’t be explained by evolution, ergo we’re “a miracle of some sort”

Most of you have probably heard of Freeman Dyson (born 1923), a mathematician and physicist of considerable accomplishment, who worked for decades at Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study.  He’s also a bit of a polymath, having published on biology and, unfortunately, on metaphysics. For, as he’s admitted, Dyson is a “nondenominational Christian”, something I didn’t know until […]

Inside the Templeton Foundation: You can have your evolution and your Adam and Eve, too

It turns out that one of our readers, who occasionally comments as “Douglas E” (DE), was involved with both BioLogos and the Templeton Foundation, and has some inside skinny on both organizations. Actually, BioLogos comes out looking much better than Templeton, since the Foundation put DE and his colleagues through endless hoops when they were trying […]

Heather Hastie’s “Science and religion” essay contest

Over at Heather’s Homilies, Heather Hastie, prop., has set up an essay competition deriving from the Templeton-sponsored “religion and science are BFFs” essay contest I posted about the other day.  Read the whole post and the contest’s rationale at her site, but here are the rules: There are two categories, and you can enter both if you […]

Templeton-sponsored essay contest: Big bucks for telling stories about accommodationism

The John Templeton Foundation, which funds many scientists who aren’t (but should be) ashamed to take money from an organization devoted to finding God in science, is up to its usual shenanigans. We have some juicy information about it that I hope I can reveal soon, but this contest, just announced, will give you an […]

An accommodationist recommends five accommodationist books

Q: Why are accommodationist historians of science like Reza Aslan? A: The historians say the Galileo episode had nothing to do with Catholicism, while Aslan says that ISIS has nothing to do with Islam. And this is by way of introducing a new Five Books piece in which a religionist recommends books on science and religion. As you […]

Let accommodationism blossom: Mayim Bialik reconciles science and religion

If you’re my age, you might remember Mayim Bialik as the star of the 1990s television show “Blossom.” Now, I’m told, she plays the role of a neuroscientist on another t.v. show I haven’t watched, “The Big Bang Theory.” But she really is trained in neuroscience: she got her Ph.D. in that field from UCLA, […]

NASA gives $1 million grant to a theological organization to study the religious implications of extraterrestrial life

Well if this don’t beat all! According to the webpage of the Center of Theological Inquiry (CTI), NASA (the National Aeronautic and Space Administration, a part of the U.S. government), has given a huge grant to the CTI to study the implications of extraterrestrial life for religion. The money will fund a team of scholars, including theologians. I quote the […]

Robert Wright’s rant against New Atheism

On his Templeton-funded “MeaningofLife.TV” site, Robert Wright fulminates about New Atheism (click on screenshot below). I’m pleased to see that both Krauss and I are included on Murderers Row along with the remains of the Horsepersons (sadly, Wright identifies me as a “paleontologist,” which is bizarre.) His beef: New Atheists lack “intellectual humility,” instantiated by their […]

AAAS refuses to consider population growth as a cause of environmental degradation, and promotes Catholic point of view

I’ve had my worries about the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), especially its cozying up to religion. They’ve collaborated with Templeton in funding an accommodationist program, the Dialogue on Science, Ethics, and Religion (DoSer), and have engaged in other religion-coddling activities unseemly for a secular science organization (see, for instance, here, here, here, and […]