Another interview with Titania McGrath

Titania McGrath, who is actually comedian Andrew Doyle, goes on Fox News—who else would have him?—to talk for 26 minutes about Titania McGrath, Her Wokeness. You can hear the show by clicking on the screenshot below

Some of the stuff you might know from the talk by Doyle I posted before, but there’s also new stuff here, too.  One is Doyle’s reaction to Ricky Gervais’s “comedy” monologue at the Golden Globes, where he was host. I’ve put the monologue below, which didn’t go down well at all with the privileged audience who took themselves quite seriously.

Another is that Titania is writing another book—for children! Have a listen.

Gervais’s comedy was really biting, and I pretty much liked it, as did Doyle. You can see why.  My favorite line is this: “If you do win an award tonight, don’t use it as a platform to make a political speech. You’re in no position to lecture the public about anything. You know nothing about the real world. Most of you spent less time in school than Greta Thunberg.”

He also goes after Apple, Amazon, and other corporations. You can be sure that he won’t be hosting this, or any other similar show, in the future.

 

 

31 Comments

  1. craigp
    Posted January 13, 2020 at 12:20 pm | Permalink

    You can be sure that he won’t be hosting this, or any other similar show, in the future.

    I wouldn’t bet on that. He’s hosted the Golden Globe awards several times before and he made similar speeches on the previous occasions, and they still keep asking him back. And long may it continue!

    I loved the look on some of the audience’s faces eg. Tom Hanks. I was also pleased to see some of the audience seemed to genuinely enjoy it.

    • Posted January 13, 2020 at 12:34 pm | Permalink

      Indeed, Gervais speech is also harmless and he brought attention to the awards. I think that even the stupider marketing departments begin to understand that any polarising publicity is good publicity. Having the media and untold numbers of social media users outrage each other in a great manufactuversy is worth millions of dollars of marketing money.

      This is known for a long time, just remember MTV awards that used to have some “controversy” over something you cannot remember anymore.

      • craigp
        Posted January 13, 2020 at 1:08 pm | Permalink

        True, all publicity is good publicity. Although I still have no idea who won any of the awards, which leads me to question the actual value of that publicity!

      • sugould
        Posted January 13, 2020 at 1:54 pm | Permalink

        He will be back. Celebrities love to be “roasted,” and Gervais is good at it. They knew what they were getting.

    • JP415
      Posted January 13, 2020 at 1:06 pm | Permalink

      Sub

    • rickflick
      Posted January 13, 2020 at 8:11 pm | Permalink

      He’s the only part of that show I bother to watch. He’s brilliant.

  2. Posted January 13, 2020 at 12:45 pm | Permalink

    I love Gervais though I am not sure he’s such a great choice to host awards shows. I applaud his attempts to educate his audience but I fully support their right to tell him to stuff it.

    One of my favorite Gervais lines is when he argues against the afterlife concept. Being dead is a lot like before you were born: nothing at all. (I would have looked up the quote but the existence of his show “After Life” defeats my search.

    • Posted January 13, 2020 at 3:00 pm | Permalink

      Yes, it reminds me of a quote from a Irvin Yalom book something to the effect that life is a spark between two voids. Why do we spend so much time concerned about the second one?

    • Vaal
      Posted January 13, 2020 at 3:57 pm | Permalink

      Paul,

      I generally agree. On one hand I’m sympathetic to Gervais’ skewering of celebrities talking about their cause on awards shows. Most people don’t care, don’t come to see this, and there can be a cringe-worthy level of self-importance in the speaker.

      On the other hand, I’m against this sentiment I often see that celebrities shouldn’t voice ANY opinions on current affairs, politics or causes because…well…they are just celebrities and what do they know?

      And yet this sentiment is typically voiced by the average joe who hardly knows any better than the celebrity and yet holds and gives voice to his/her views on all sorts of topics. IMO it’s a superficial idea to imagine all celebrities as cartoons bereft of any knowledge on politics or whatever. In fact, I’ve seen plenty of celebrities who have a cause about which they clearly know quite a bit, and more than the cynics who are dissing them for taking a stand. Lots of eye-rolling is aimed at celebrities who take up a cause, even to help stricken people in other countries. Well, at least the celebrities got off their ass and tried to help vs the cynic sitting behind his computer who is only producing snark.

      So, yeah, a comedic stance getting laughs at deflating the more naive or self-important crowing of celebrities on awards shows is good. But I don’t go in for the general cynicism that dismisses a celebrities stance just because they are celebrities and “therefore ought to just make movies/music and shut up about everything else.”

      “One of my favorite Gervais lines is when he argues against the afterlife concept. Being dead is a lot like before you were born: nothing at all.”

      That’s a well-worn argument raised by atheists against the “problem” or fear posed by not believing in an afterlife.

      And I’ve never liked it. “Why fear non-existence when you are dead? It didn’t bother you before you were born” seems only superficially clever, but doesn’t really get to the bottom of the fear.

      The problem clearly stems from the fact we ARE alive, and have desires, plans, goals, which will be thwarted by dying. I have for instance a son who needs care, whose well-being I work toward and care deeply about. If I were to die tomorrow it would make his life far harder. No one really thinks the comeback “Why care? You won’t be around to worry about that anyway?” is, or should be, sufficient either in terms of morals or wisdom on the subject.

      The same actually applies to any desire or goal I may have, that won’t be able to be realized if I perish.

      • GBJames
        Posted January 13, 2020 at 4:12 pm | Permalink

        “but doesn’t really get to the bottom of the fear”

        But I think it does. The fear “at the bottom” is based on the religious notion of an afterlife. Recognizing that there’s no afterlife frees one from the fear.

        The situation you describe, of the son who needs care, isn’t really a fear of dying, it is a fear of the son losing support. This would happen if you lived on forever, incapacitated in an iron lung machine.

        • infiniteimprobabilit
          Posted January 14, 2020 at 3:28 am | Permalink

          I don’t fear being dead.

          I do, however, sometimes feel regret that I will (in a few years time) no longer be alive.

          😉

          cr

        • Vaal
          Posted January 14, 2020 at 4:19 pm | Permalink

          “But I think it does. The fear “at the bottom” is based on the religious notion of an afterlife. “

          No it definitely doesn’t.

          I don’t believe in an after life. But I don’t want to die (anytime soon). I fear for the loss of goals/projects/things I value when I die. Nothing at all religious about it.

          “The situation you describe, of the son who needs care, isn’t really a fear of dying, it is a fear of the son losing support. This would happen if you lived on forever, incapacitated in an iron lung machine.”

          Of course!

          Being incapacitated by illness is something to fear in relation to it’s effect on my son’s well being.

          So is my dying.

          There are many ways in which my goals/desires can be thwarted. Being incapacitated is one. Dying is one of them.

          Again…nothing religious about it. And saying “but you won’t feel or know anything when you are dead” completely avoids the concerns I’ve pointed to.

          • GBJames
            Posted January 14, 2020 at 7:31 pm | Permalink

            Again, that’s not fear of death it is fear of missing the party… and I doubt you really are talking about fear. I feel that way, too. I’ve no desire to miss out on cool experiences, but that’s NOT being afraid of death. I think you just muddy the water by equating fear of death with every sort of thing you would rather not happen.

  3. GBJames
    Posted January 13, 2020 at 12:54 pm | Permalink

    Sub

  4. Posted January 13, 2020 at 12:59 pm | Permalink

    I loved his speech, and i felt that everything he said needed to be said. The truth hurts.

  5. Randall Schenck
    Posted January 13, 2020 at 1:15 pm | Permalink

    I think they already replaced him for next time. We still get to see Ricky on You Tube.

  6. gravelinspector-Aidan
    Posted January 13, 2020 at 1:32 pm | Permalink

    One is Doyle’s reaction to Ricky Gervais’s “comedy” monologue at the Golden Globes, where he was host.

    I actually saw some of his stuff a few days ago – some character in a cleaning company? I turned it off and watched something else after about 5 minutes. Is he really as famous as his public profile suggests, because I couldn’t see any redeeming features to his comedy.

  7. Posted January 13, 2020 at 1:38 pm | Permalink

    Insults sting. And then fade. Most of the targeted will blithely traipse along in their lives afterward. How could you otherwise, when all is comfort, quality, contemplation, and joy?

    I don’t want to cast too much disparagement when I should look in the mirror. The king always had his fool – wisdom of the past.

  8. John Dentinger
    Posted January 13, 2020 at 2:00 pm | Permalink

    Are there any other gamers here like myself who first saw Ricky Gervais perform on GTA4?
    There he was, onstage at the Split Sides club, making fun of kids with cancer–and AIDS. That was a LOT more anti-woke than anything he did at the Golden Globes. Funnier, too.

  9. Jimbo
    Posted January 13, 2020 at 2:08 pm | Permalink

    If you need a stiffer drink than Titania, here’s Jonathan Pie on Gervais’s Golden Globes monologue. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=_aoHa0cwvxA

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted January 14, 2020 at 3:34 am | Permalink

      Hey, good one!!

      cr

  10. Jenny Haniver
    Posted January 13, 2020 at 2:49 pm | Permalink

    Following Massimo’s twitter feed, I was shocked to find another transgression that must be reported to Titania McGrath post haste.

    Seems that one of the ways giant honey bees, native to Asia, protect themselves from predators by doing the “Mexican wave.”

    They’re not Mexican bees. This is shameful.

    • Jenny Haniver
      Posted January 13, 2020 at 3:17 pm | Permalink

      Not only is this base apian cultural appropriation, it is exceedingly unwoke to call Latinx people Mexicans – even Mexicans.

      Years ago, I was soundly chastised when I referred to a person from Mexico as a Mexican. Granted the person I was speaking to didn’t know the specific country the person was from, but the first words out of her mouth were to proscribe my description because it contained the word Mexican, which she regarded as a generic term of opprobrium for people of Latin descent in the New World.

      Should I have said “A person of Latinx descent who is from Mexico”? And how do you pronounce the x, the Mexican way or the American Way – I think the American Way trumps the Mexican way, and Mexicans should not permitted to refer to themselves as Mexicans. I’m sure Titania would agree.

      • Jenny Haniver
        Posted January 13, 2020 at 3:53 pm | Permalink

        I should be glad they’re not doing the Mexican Hat Dance, or perhaps they do but it hasn’t yet been observed.

  11. Diana MacPherson
    Posted January 13, 2020 at 3:07 pm | Permalink

    I’m sad that Ricky Gervais is no longer doing his Sirius XM show. I pretty much kept my subscription for his show. I use a line he used in a conversation with Diane Morgan when she asked him how he knew all these things, “because I’m educated.”

  12. Barry Lyons
    Posted January 13, 2020 at 3:59 pm | Permalink

    I also liked Gervais’s monologue, but I don’t quite understand this insinuation that actors should just act and shut up about everything else. George Clooney is quite knowledgeable about Sudan. Don Cheadle co-founded an organization that monitors genocide. There are many other examples. So why does this cliché of the empty-headed actor persist? I don’t get it.

    Also, American actors are American citizens! They have a right to speak forthrightly about any political social issue, and if some of them use money as a megaphone to get things done (contributing to gun control efforts, for example), well, more power to them.

    • Posted January 13, 2020 at 4:50 pm | Permalink

      I agree. My only question is whether Gervais is a good choice as host. I have no problem with a celebrity using their 15 seconds to spout off on their favorite issue unless I was running an awards show and paying them a lot of money for giving out awards.

      Truthfully, it is not a hill on which I would sit for long, let alone die. I don’t even watch awards shows. I will admit to wanting to see whatever film wins “best picture”, assuming I haven’t already.

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted January 13, 2020 at 5:13 pm | Permalink

      I think the joke is specific to the time and place. Gervais wasn’t saying that actors should STFU about issues but he is saying that in this particular venue while receiving a reward, could you spare us the sanctimony. He’s also taking the piss and him taking the piss and Gervais understands that nothing is funnier than taking down someone who is on the top – he often does this by making fun of himself as fat and old.

      • GBJames
        Posted January 13, 2020 at 5:58 pm | Permalink

        There’s irony in, and I’m sure Gervais was completely aware of it, in his taking time to spout off, giving us all a healthy dose of his celebrity opinion.

  13. wiseape108
    Posted January 14, 2020 at 12:44 pm | Permalink

    If you’re offended by his Globes appearances then you definately don’t want to see him at the British version – the BAFTAs:


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