Photos of readers

Today’s reader is Graham Martin-Royle, who sent an awesome picture that looks like something out of Tolkien.

Here you go: I moved up to Scotland last year and I’m pictured here in Dunbeath Broch.

32 Comments

  1. GBJames
    Posted August 26, 2019 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

    Awesome photo! (As the kids would say.)

    • Heather Hastie
      Posted August 26, 2019 at 9:26 pm | Permalink

      I’m no kid, and it’s what I say too! 😀

    • Graham Martin-Royle
      Posted August 27, 2019 at 4:47 am | Permalink

      Why, thank you 🙂

  2. Randall Schenck
    Posted August 26, 2019 at 3:25 pm | Permalink

    That’s a really nice walking stick.

    • Ken Kukec
      Posted August 26, 2019 at 4:21 pm | Permalink

      Calls for a Leon Redbone tune.

      • GBJames
        Posted August 26, 2019 at 4:23 pm | Permalink

        😉

        He feels undressed without his cane.

    • Graham Martin-Royle
      Posted August 27, 2019 at 4:47 am | Permalink

      Thanks. I bought it during a 3 month road trip across Texas, New Mexico and Arizona Last year. The seller told me it was made in China and I bought it at a Chinese market in Texas!

      I collect walking sticks and have several from around the world. This one has become my favourite to use while out hiking.

  3. Ken Kukec
    Posted August 26, 2019 at 4:14 pm | Permalink

    Needs a “NONE SHALL PASS” sign!

  4. Posted August 26, 2019 at 4:49 pm | Permalink

    Abandon all hope, ye who enter here.

  5. Mark R.
    Posted August 26, 2019 at 5:01 pm | Permalink

    The small doorway makes Graham look somewhat like a giant. Fee-fi-fo-fum! 🙂

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted August 27, 2019 at 7:27 am | Permalink

      It also makes undesired visitors feel very prone to a shillelagh to the back of the head. Which is it’s intention. Brochs are (generally reckoned to be) defensive structures, and as such are meant to make visitors feel decidedly unwelcome.

      Dunbeath Broch is at “58°15’16.26 N 3°26’27.33 W” near the Caithness coast (most brochs are pretty close to the coast) overlooking the Inner Moray Firth between Helmsdale (of the gold panning) and Wick (of the teuchter jokes). Actually quite close to the Lybster drilling site.

      • ThyroidPlanet
        Posted August 27, 2019 at 7:38 am | Permalink

        Interesting words!

      • ThyroidPlanet
        Posted August 27, 2019 at 7:43 am | Permalink

        Wikipedia:

        “Bodiam Castle was used in Monty Python and the Holy Grail in an establishing shot identifying it as “Swamp Castle” in the “Tale of Sir Lancelot” sequence.”

      • Mark R.
        Posted August 27, 2019 at 12:01 pm | Permalink

        Thanks for this added interesting tid-bit.

  6. Posted August 26, 2019 at 5:11 pm | Permalink

    Far out!

  7. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted August 26, 2019 at 5:36 pm | Permalink

    I love words like Dunbeath Broch – delightful pic, cool wizard staff!

  8. rickflick
    Posted August 26, 2019 at 8:03 pm | Permalink

    Looks like a fascinating place. I’ll assume the stonework is rather old – perhaps centuries.

    • Graham Martin-Royle
      Posted August 27, 2019 at 4:55 am | Permalink

      According to the plaque, it’s about 2500 years old. Caithness is littered with stuff like this.

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted August 27, 2019 at 7:42 am | Permalink

        About 100 brochs (or alleged brochs) were examined as part of the Caithness Brochs Project – actually that page has another view of your resting place – though 2500 years may be a bit high for an age. Secure radiocarbon dates for construction are thin on the ground, but point to about the BCE/ CE change of dating. Before about 1000CE, a lot of Scottish history is really poorly dated.

      • rickflick
        Posted August 27, 2019 at 8:48 am | Permalink

        I try to put myself back in time and imagine living in places like this. Probably pretty rough lives were lived among those stone walls. Makes you thankful for modern conveniences (typewriter, flying cars, Foreman Grill, etc.)

      • Posted August 28, 2019 at 12:03 pm | Permalink

        Wow, that’s old, even for the (well, for a while) UK!

  9. Graham Head
    Posted August 26, 2019 at 8:15 pm | Permalink

    Try millenia. Though it has been rebuilt several times. http://www.aocarchaeology.com/news/article/dunbeath-broch/

    • rickflick
      Posted August 26, 2019 at 8:25 pm | Permalink

      Fascinating. It reminds me of Newgrange in Ireland, which I had the great pleasure of visiting. Nice to see that the place is starting to be developed as a managed site for visitors. I’ve not been to Scotland…yet.

  10. Pierluigi Ballabeni
    Posted August 27, 2019 at 2:10 am | Permalink

    Amazing, such a construction could be in Switzerland or Italy! It looks like plenty of places in the area I come from.

  11. Graham Martin-Royle
    Posted August 27, 2019 at 4:52 am | Permalink

    Just in case anyone’s interested, a short aerial video of Dunbeath.

    • Graham Martin-Royle
      Posted August 27, 2019 at 4:53 am | Permalink

      Damn, sorry PCC(e), that was supposed to be just the link, not embed.

    • GBJames
      Posted August 27, 2019 at 7:06 am | Permalink

      Hey! I drove that road just last October on the way to Orkney. Wonderful geography.

    • rickflick
      Posted August 27, 2019 at 8:41 am | Permalink

      Great views.

  12. Blue
    Posted August 27, 2019 at 7:59 am | Permalink

    Well, I for one am quite, quite fond
    of the facial hair. The more the better.
    Anywhere … … upon the person. Either gender.

    An evolutionary loveliness, as I stated,
    that I am happy many of AllWeAll remain exhibiting !

    Blue

    • GBJames
      Posted August 27, 2019 at 8:03 am | Permalink

      I’m opposed to facial hair that isn’t found on a face.

  13. Nicolaas Stempels
    Posted August 27, 2019 at 1:39 pm | Permalink

    You look like a Giant Dwarf guardian. No passing without the key. Awesome.

  14. Posted August 28, 2019 at 6:23 am | Permalink

    The personification perhaps of the saying from Theodore Roosevelt “speak softly and carry a big stick.”


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