More words I hate

It’s time for another installment of “words and phrases that repel me”. Today we have four, and I’ll use as examples my favorite website to hate, HuffPost. (Click on screenshots to see the shameful usage.)

1.) Impactful.  I’m not even going to look this up to see it’s a word; it probably is in the OED or some place similar. But it’s odious, repugnant, and odiferous. Yes, I know it’s shorter than the alternatives, though some adjectives, like “effective” can occasionally replace it. It sounds awkward.

2.) Dragged.  As in “throw shade on”, meaning, “criticized” or “vilified”. It’s with-it millennial jargon, and it’s also confusing, for those who don’t know its use in the argot might think that someone is literally being dragged. (And don’t get me started on “literally”.)

3.) Haters. To shut down discussion of any topic, just refer to critics or opponents as “haters.” Nobody wants to be a hater, and it’s a good way to mock (even if it doesn’t silence) those whom you don’t like. And no, AOC didn’t “shut down” anybody: as far as I know, the GOP critics of her views are still there. I may have used this word before in a “words I hate” post. I guess I’m a word hater.

4.) Minoritized. This is an example of Orwell’s notion that new words and phrases can be constructed to carry a hidden political message.  It used to be “minorities”, which was accurate in singling out groups that were not in the numerical or political majority. By referring to “minoritized” people, you now add the notion that they have been diminished or oppressed. That may be the case, but sometimes it’s not, and, at any rate, why not use the words “oppressed minorities” or “oppressed” instead?

Now, of course, it’s your turn to vent.

258 Comments

  1. Posted May 19, 2019 at 1:52 pm | Permalink

    I agree with most of the OP’s choices, but “Haters”? Quite useful in referring to people who almost make a profession out of hating other people and things. Indeed, some haters do make a profession out of it. Rush Limbaugh is certainly a hater.

    • Ken Kukec
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:34 pm | Permalink

      I don’t have a problem with “haters,” either, at least in informal writing or speech, though it’s grossly overused these days (appearing even in the twitter account emanating from the White House residence).

  2. Mark Cagnetta
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 1:53 pm | Permalink

    Affect not effect

  3. Posted May 19, 2019 at 1:54 pm | Permalink

    “Haters” vexes me too!

  4. yazikus
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 1:56 pm | Permalink

    Impactful

    Makes me think, less than pleasantly, of teeth. Or bowel movements.

    • Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

      Yes, “voiding the impaction” in room 234 of the geriatric unit.

  5. Ken Kukec
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 1:59 pm | Permalink

    “Impactful” — Hell, I don’t care for “impact” as a verb. It, and its spawn “impactful,” ought to be used about as often as the comet Shoemaker Levy 9 crashes into Saturn.

    “Minoritize” — Always think twice before using a word that ends in “-ize,” is my motto, especially if it’s a neologism. They tend to bureaucratize language.

    • Carey Haug
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:06 pm | Permalink

      Racialized comes to mind.

    • Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:04 pm | Permalink

      As you know, Ken, my last name is Miranda, so thanks for that. May I assume you’ve never used that abomination “Mirandize” in you law practice?

      • Ken Kukec
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:13 pm | Permalink

        It’s cop-speak, as much a part of their lexicon as locutions like “the suspect exited a vehicle, black in color.”

        I’m afraid its usage has invaded every corner of our justice system and, through tv, of our society at large, including, shamefully, yours truly.

        • infiniteimprobabilit
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:37 pm | Permalink

          I could never stand that use of ‘vehicle’ (or ‘weapon’ for that matter). Why use a long generic word when a short, more specific one is more accurate?
          “The suspect exited his vehicle and displayed a weapon” is bullshit when we *know* the suspect got out of his car holding a gun. It also tells us *less* about the situation. My sarcastic comment is usually “Oh, so the suspect got out of his flying saucer proudly showing you his neutron blaster, did he?”

          (I suspect it’s sheer pomposity, with a feeling that if they quote legalese it makes them sound more important.)

          cr

          • Diana MacPherson
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:08 pm | Permalink

            I say vehicle all the time. When I was working in a campground, I found that people who didn’t speak English well, visiting from Europe, didn’t know what the hell that way so I can do say “automobile” or “car”. Latin. It’ll get ya!

            • Martin Levin
              Posted May 24, 2019 at 2:20 am | Permalink

              Speaking of Latin, how about `Latinx,`apparently used by the Woke exclusively,but now seeping insidiously into the mainstream.

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted May 24, 2019 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

                I’m trying to popularize the neuter of alumnus/alumna: alumnum. Fun to say and gender neutral.

              • merilee
                Posted May 24, 2019 at 3:16 pm | Permalink

                Numnum

              • ThyroidPlanet
                Posted May 24, 2019 at 3:21 pm | Permalink

                Aluminum
                Aluminium

                Couldn’t resist

              • rickflick
                Posted May 24, 2019 at 5:11 pm | Permalink

                Aluminum is the financial office where the alumnum are fleeced irregardless of gender.

    • Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:15 pm | Permalink

      It was Jupiter, not Saturn. 😉

      • Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:16 pm | Permalink

        Was that your point? It should never be used?

        • Ken Kukec
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:48 pm | Permalink

          Yeah, pretty much never.

          And what’s the difference in an orbit 400 million miles or so further out among friends? 🙂

    • Nicolaas Stempels
      Posted May 20, 2019 at 1:51 pm | Permalink

      I guess we could accept that the asteroid causing the K/T extinction could be described as ‘impactful’?

  6. phoffman56
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:01 pm | Permalink

    My whines are all curmudgeonly, so pretty unimportant:

    1/ However, while decrying the verb ‘minoritize’, Jerry reminded me of the stupidity of people referring to a single person as a ‘minority’. N.B. This is not the set of persons consisting only of the one person, where it could be correct, if silly. By thinking about the empty set, with nothing in it, versus the set whose only member is the empty set, Bertrand Russell became aware of the error in identifying an object with the set containing only that object.

    2/ ‘Read’ is a verb, not a noun. Refer to it as a novel, short story, report, scientific paper, whatever, not a bloody ‘read’!

    • Ken Kukec
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:20 pm | Permalink

      The Mahatma famously said “even if you are a minority of one, the truth is the truth.”

      And in Nineteen Eighty-Four, Orwell wrote, “Being in a minority, even in a minority of one, did not make you mad.”

      Be ok with me, though, were we to reserve the phrase “minority of one” to just those two. 🙂

      • phoffman56
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:34 pm | Permalink

        No need to reserve: ‘a minority of one’ simply means the set whose only member is that person. But it does not mean that person, period.

        And I use the verb ‘to mean’ here to mean what it should mean, namely ‘is defined to be’. But it is hard to avoid the imprecision of using ‘means’ when meaning to say ‘implies’! Oops, I just used its third meaning of means, namely ‘intends’. And I am a person of means who could afford to take an English course in university.

        • infiniteimprobabilit
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:54 pm | Permalink

          “When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.”

          😉

          cr

          • ThyroidPlanet
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:05 pm | Permalink

            There’s glory for you!

          • Diana MacPherson
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:16 pm | Permalink

            Wow, I didn’t know Humpty Dumpty was so scornful. Maybe he deserved that great fall.

          • phoffman56
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 7:35 pm | Permalink

            Lewis Carroll (AKA Charles Dodgson) was a mathematician (though more famous for Alice…), and fussiness about exact definitions is a property (a curse?) we tend to exhibit.

            • infiniteimprobabilit
              Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:03 pm | Permalink

              I sympathise. I’m an engineer, and while I will accept generalities in describing technical matters, they should not be so vague or inappropriate as to give a misleading impression. Which, sadly, many do.

              cr

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:27 pm | Permalink

                Yes, I’ve learned the hard way not to be vague when talking with engineers.

              • rickflick
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:37 pm | Permalink

                Vague? Can you be more explicit?

              • Posted May 20, 2019 at 12:48 pm | Permalink

                Two engineers talking,
                Eng 1. Where did you get that new bicycle?
                Eng 2. This beautiful girl rode up to me on it, threw it to the ground, tore off all her clothes and said, take whatever you want.
                Eng 1. So what did you do?
                Eng 2. I took the bicycle but unfortunately her clothes didnt fit.

                I am an engineer.

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:41 pm | Permalink

      I agree with the objection to ‘read’. As noted, ‘read’ is a verb.

      My same objection applies even more strongly to ‘ask’, as in ‘That’s a tough ask’. (It’s a f@#$$%n ‘request’, or ‘task’, or ‘job’).
      Is that only NZ or Aussie slang? If so, it should be stamped out before it spreads.

      cr

      • Diana MacPherson
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:10 pm | Permalink

        No, we use “ask” as a noun here too. Now, I am going to use it to ask a question in a crowd:

        *raises hand* I have an “ask”.

    • Nicolaas Stempels
      Posted May 20, 2019 at 1:59 pm | Permalink

      Hence ‘nobody’ is the ultimate minority.

    • Nicolaas Stempels
      Posted May 20, 2019 at 1:59 pm | Permalink

      Hence ‘nobody’ is the ultimate minority.

      • phoffman56
        Posted May 21, 2019 at 5:25 am | Permalink

        Yes, it’s hard to imagine a minority of size ‘negative 1’.

  7. Barry Lyons
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:03 pm | Permalink

    I don’t mind “haters” but, heh, I’ve always hated “impactful.”

    • phoffman56
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:07 pm | Permalink

      I hate it when A unjustifiably refers to B, who disagrees with C, as a “hater” of C. Of course, A agrees with C, disagrees with B.

  8. Mark R.
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:20 pm | Permalink

    I once had a friend (I have since lost contact with him) who had a group of “forbidden words”. I don’t remember all of them, but I do remember “slacks” and “briquettes”. I don’t know why he hated these words, and I don’t know why I still remember these hated words.

    I personally hate the word trump. I used to not mind it, but for some reason, I now loathe it. 😉

    • Ken Kukec
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:25 pm | Permalink

      Some people just hate the sound of certain words, I think. I understand many cringe at hearing “moist.”

      • rickflick
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:09 pm | Permalink

        Of course there’s “awesome”, though it’s less used now. “epic” is just as bad. A friend is a “foodie” which I think is just fine, but not the term “foodie”.

        • Mark R.
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:23 pm | Permalink

          When it comes to words like “awesome”, I’ve been hearing a lot of “sweet”, pronounced as “suweeet”. Not sure if it bugs me yet. I still say awesome. I think that one started in the 80’s…Jeff Spicoli immortalized it. I need to learn how to turn text into a link…

      • Nicolaas Stempels
        Posted May 20, 2019 at 2:03 pm | Permalink

        But how would they describe a good chocolate cake? Non-dry? Moist is a very useful term, even not thinking of chocolate cakes. It somehow has a vaguely sexual connotation too ( I’ll spare you an example) 😁

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:42 pm | Permalink

      My friend hates w00t. I once put it on her FB page and it bothered her so much that she deleted my comment.

      • Mark R.
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:19 pm | Permalink

        Not to make fun of your friend, but that’s hilarious.

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:39 pm | Permalink

          Yes non she realized it was ridiculous but couldn’t stand the word there.

    • Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:04 pm | Permalink

      Trump, old english slang word for fart. Still used in the midlands i am advised.

      • Mark R.
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:18 pm | Permalink

        Perfect. I’ll remember that!

      • rickflick
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:21 pm | Permalink

        Remarkably apropos.

      • Ken Kukec
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:09 pm | Permalink

        Phew, who trumped?!

        • rickflick
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:02 pm | Permalink

          The Electoral College. 😎

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:15 pm | Permalink

        Still used in the midlands i am advised.

        Certainly was, the last few times I was there. With attendant disgusted hilarity about the latest Septic-in-Chief.

        • Frank Bath
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 7:19 pm | Permalink

          My London teenage children used trump for fart. I never got used to it.

        • darrelle
          Posted May 20, 2019 at 2:37 pm | Permalink

          This is awesome. Almost as awesome as learning “Budgie Smugglers” from Heather.

      • Jenny Haniver
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 8:24 pm | Permalink

        Alexander Pope once called a fart a “posterior trumpet.”

        • infiniteimprobabilit
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:24 pm | Permalink

          And I can’t help noting that ‘le pet’ is French for ‘fart’, thus conveying the meaning twice.

          Apparently (according to some TV ‘news’ item I just saw) there is a gaggle of socialites at Mar-a-Lago who call themselves the ‘Trumpettes’.

          Ummmm….

          cr

          • Diana MacPherson
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:29 pm | Permalink

            Hahaha. Le pet is funny.

          • Ken Kukec
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 10:26 pm | Permalink

            It’s my understanding peter was the Old French word for breaking wind, which is whence the word for a small bomb, pétard, is derived. So when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern got hoist with theirs, Shakespeare was, in part, making a French fart joke.

            • Jenny Haniver
              Posted May 20, 2019 at 2:35 am | Permalink

              “And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.”

              After your “understanding” we have a new reading of Matthew 16:18.
              See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crepitus_(mythology)

              I digress: This is true: beneath he throne of Peter at the Vatican are the pre-Christian remnants of a taurobolium, where the priests of Cybelle would sacrifice bulls and let their blood drench them; and also castrate themselves.

            • merilee
              Posted May 20, 2019 at 8:59 pm | Permalink

              My friend just reminded me of an old French exp’n for a pretentious person: “Il pet plus haut que son cul.”

      • Posted May 19, 2019 at 10:23 pm | Permalink

        I can just see a new comedy series called “Farty Towers”!

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:04 pm | Permalink

          One of my favourite word rearrangements on Fawlty Towers was “Farty Owls”.

          • merilee
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:06 pm | Permalink

            i think it was Farty Towels, which is even funnier/grosser for a hotel🤓

            • Diana MacPherson
              Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:10 pm | Permalink

              Yes it was Fatty Owls and Farty Towels.

      • KerissP
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 10:43 pm | Permalink

        Berkeley Breathed did a hilarious series of strips riffing on that some years back.

      • Bob
        Posted May 20, 2019 at 6:21 am | Permalink

        From the Online Etymology Dictionary

        etymonline.com/word/trump

        trump (v.2)

        “fabricate, devise,” 1690s, from trump “deceive, cheat” (1510s), from Middle English trumpen (late 14c.), from Old French tromper “to deceive,” of uncertain origin. Apparently from se tromper de “to mock,” from Old French tromper “to blow a trumpet.” Brachet explains this as “to play the horn, alluding to quacks and mountebanks, who attracted the public by blowing a horn, and then cheated them into buying ….” The Hindley Old French dictionary has baillier la trompe “blow the trumpet” as “act the fool,” and Donkin connects it rather to trombe “waterspout,” on the notion of turning (someone) around. Connection with triumph also has been proposed. Related: Trumped; trumping. Trumped up “false, concocted” first recorded 1728.

  9. Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:23 pm | Permalink

    “Unpack” for simply meaning more details, context or one’s own opinion.

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:43 pm | Permalink

      I don’t like “unpack”. It triggers me. I remember coming up with a sentence of hated words with some colleagues & “unpack was in there.

      • merilee
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:07 pm | Permalink

        Deep dive🤮

        • gravelinspector-Aidan
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:15 pm | Permalink

          40m or deeper?

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:00 pm | Permalink

          I confess to saying “deep dive” a lot at work but we do have to distinguish how deep we are going to go with an analysis.

          • rickflick
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:10 pm | Permalink

            Many of such words are jargon used in work environments. In their place, I suppose, they can be OK, since they have shared meaning among a group working more or less closely together. They can be shorthand and lubricate the gears of effective communication.

            • Diana MacPherson
              Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:19 pm | Permalink

              Yes and recently I’m working outside of IT and I say things like “Okay I’ll ping him after this meeting” and I think, “I wonder if they know what I’m talking about” because I’ve said that to friends and they didn’t know what it meant.

              • infiniteimprobabilit
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:29 pm | Permalink

                ‘ping’ is a technical term, along with e.g. ‘404’. I think their spread into general use is limited. But ‘wifi’ and ‘bandwidth’ and ‘USB’ are pretty much mainstream by now.

                cr

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:40 pm | Permalink

                Stepping out of the IT world makes me realize what an esoteric dork I am.

              • rickflick
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:54 pm | Permalink

                I’ll bet your fun at a party. 😎

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 10:03 pm | Permalink

                I’m totally fun at a party!

      • Filippo
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 8:34 pm | Permalink

        I gather that it involves an unpaction, as opposed to an impaction.

      • Nicolaas Stempels
        Posted May 20, 2019 at 2:07 pm | Permalink

        When younger I loved to unpack Santa’s presents.

  10. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:34 pm | Permalink

    “haters” sucks. Sometimes it might pass because the user of the word is deliberately trying to sound silly, or … what, at the bar on their second round?… actually AOC was a bartender…

    me? nothing! no words lately! I think WEIT is helping.

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:46 pm | Permalink

      It makes me get the Taylor Swift song in my head which iI just can’t shake shake shake shake shake.

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:35 pm | Permalink

        Ol’ Shakey has a cure for your earworm :

        An untimely ague

        (Henry8 A1 S1)

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:07 pm | Permalink

          I once said I had the “ague” to someone at work and they had no idea what I was talking about.

          I’m so alone.

          • gravelinspector-Aidan
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:16 pm | Permalink

            But they are used to that sort of thing.

          • merilee
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 7:02 pm | Permalink

            Ach, the anguish of ague🙀

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:07 pm | Permalink

          I once said I had the “ague” to someone at work and they had no idea what I was talking about.

          I’m so alone.

          • Ken Kukec
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 10:32 pm | Permalink

            Ague? Most people today don’t even know what “the grip” is.

            • Diana MacPherson
              Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:06 pm | Permalink

              Is it too much to ask that they at least watch Black Adder? Yes.

  11. Diana MacPherson
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:39 pm | Permalink

    Commonly used in my parts is the word “racialized” which sounds/reads a lot like radicalized. I think it is a synonym of minoritized.

  12. Randall Schenck
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:42 pm | Permalink

    Here are a couple of Trump items I can’t take, besides all of them.

    Strongly – He will say he is strongly for something.

    Low Energy – Calls people low energy. That would be just about everyone who is not kissing his butt.

    No collusion – no matter how many times he does it.

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:45 pm | Permalink

      Oh yes “low energy”. I was remarking to myself how I felt that my energy levels were low & I immediately heard Trump’s voice saying “she’s very low energy”.

      • Ken Kukec
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:08 pm | Permalink

        It worked regarding Jeb! — a lot better than was counteracted by that silly exclamation point of his, anyway.

        • Randall Schenck
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:24 pm | Permalink

          These are very some alarming words for Trump lately – subpoena and deutsche

          • Ken Kukec
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:36 pm | Permalink

            Yeah, doesn’t surprise me one bit. Deutsche was the only bank that would lend the Donald serious dough after his bust-out operations in Atlantic City. And it’s a known industrial laundromat for the filthy lucre of Russian oligarchs.

            From what I hear, the accounts of both Trump and Kushner got flagged for suspicious money-laundering transactions, but reporting it to the US Treasury Dept., as was its duty, got kiboshed by Deutsche’s top management.

            Will the Republicans in congress go on ignoring this, too?

            • Nicolaas Stempels
              Posted May 20, 2019 at 2:10 pm | Permalink

              Yes, they will.

  13. Thanny
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:43 pm | Permalink

    Every time I hear “dragged”, it hurts my brain, because I know “through the mud” is supposed to come next, but never does.

    I can fairly say I despise that neologism.

  14. Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:53 pm | Permalink

    I thought “dragged” referred to tourists visiting during happy hour at a cash-only gay bar on 9th Street.

  15. Michael Fisher
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

    “No deal is better than a bad deal”
    “Take back control”
    “Hard Brexit”
    “Soft Brexit”

    blahblahblahblahblah

    And “Lame duck” – there should be no lame ducks!!!!

    P.S. Are there no squirrels these days in the vicinity of UofC Botany Pond? I’ve seen no cute squirrel progress reports for yonks.

  16. Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:06 pm | Permalink

    I hate “sustainable.” If the word ever had any meaning, which I doubt, it’s been lost through overuse. So even the word isn’t sustainable.

    • Mark R.
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:33 pm | Permalink

      You made two other words (phrases rather) come to mind.

      “Head to tail” when a chef is referring to not wasting any part of an animal.
      “Farm to table” when a chef is referring to locally sourced food.

      For some reason, these phrases seem pretentious…as if the chef is trying to sound woke.

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:45 pm | Permalink

        Memo to self – Oxtail, as stew or soup. Onto the shopping list.

        • merilee
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:56 pm | Permalink

          Yum- especially curried😋

          • Mark R.
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 7:48 pm | Permalink

            Yes, I’ve never had the curried version, but never met an oxtail I didn’t enjoy.

  17. Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:13 pm | Permalink

    “Quiz” -when newspapers report that the police have quizzed someone about crime. This is ridiculous.

    And someone put this headline on an article today by Nick Cohen: “When the far right crack rape jokes, it’s part of a systemic bid to demean”. Since when can a bid be systemic? Systematic, please.

    Pulled pork. Where the heck did this come from all of a sudden? Why is it everywhere? Has it really been pulled? What is going on?

    • Michael Fisher
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:32 pm | Permalink

      Pulled pork: I have been aware of the culinary term in the UK for only four or five years. It reached a usage crescendo last year & I assume it did so because it is/was a trend on TV cooking shows & as an ingredient in fancy sarnie recipes.

      Not very interesting food that relies on a good & usually somewhat sweet sauce.

      It’s very cheap, nutritious, stringy slow cooked [BBQ or oven usually] shoulder of pork that falls apart into strands when it’s ‘pulled’ with a fork. Name originates from the Southern US States & I’m guessing it’s an old term over there.

      • Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:51 pm | Permalink

        Thanks. It turned up here in Germany last year, about the time, I guess, when it crescendoed in the UK.

        • Mark R.
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:07 pm | Permalink

          Is it labeled “Pulled Pork” or the German translation? According to my translator: Schweinefleisch gezogen.

          I guess if the Germans are trying to market it as an American food, they’d keep the English translation.

          • merilee
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:12 pm | Permalink

            Schweinfleisch gezogen does NOT have a real ring to it…

            • chris moffatt
              Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:26 pm | Permalink

              try gezogene Schweinefleisch instead.

              • merilee
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:40 pm | Permalink

                Marginally beßer.

              • Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:45 pm | Permalink

                Alas, it would have to be ‘gezogenes Schweinefleisch’. (After 20 years of struggling with German grammar, I have to correct what I can!)

              • merilee
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:57 pm | Permalink

                Ja, das Fleisch, I guess.

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:13 pm | Permalink

                Neuters in German – they’ll get ya!

                BTW, there is an aversion in higher ed to using “alumni” because it is gender specific. The other day, in a meeting, I said, “Latin has a neuter”. We could say “alumnum” and you get to say that!” Then I kept saying it, amusing everyone. The plural would be alumna.

              • rickflick
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:14 pm | Permalink

                I think you’ve started something.

            • Ken Kukec
              Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:49 pm | Permalink

              I’d hesitate to order it, and I’ll order pretty much anything. 🙂

            • gravelinspector-Aidan
              Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:51 pm | Permalink

              When talking about “pork products”, the phrase “a real ring” is … ominous. And while I’m looking for the oxtail, I’ll pick up a few faggots too – king of the suspicious pig innard mixtures.

              • merilee
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:59 pm | Permalink

                Faggots?? I had only heard of them as pieces of wood or gay men..

              • gravelinspector-Aidan
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:07 pm | Permalink

                King – IMHO – of the processed pork product. If you ever find yourself in the UK, particularly if accompanied by an American unfamiliar with the concept, try ordering a saucy faggot at a British cuisine restaurant.
                Oh. “British cuisine restaurant.” Yeah, that’s going to be a problem.

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:17 pm | Permalink

                I think Michael posted a picture some weird looking canned faggots earlier.

          • Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:42 pm | Permalink

            No, it’s not translated. Weird English useages seem to be popular here.

        • Michael Fisher
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:15 pm | Permalink

          Perhaps it came to us Europeans via your Aldi Nord and/or Aldi Süd stores? Aldi Süd has 1,800 stores in the USA & Aldi Nord has the US Trader Joe’s chain [500? stores].

          In the UK we have Aldi Süd & they have the occasional “American Week” a few times a year where they have half an aisle length dedicated to [usually] abysmal European interpretations of US foods such as blueberry pie, oversweet sickening pancakes, hotdogs in jars, 2-in-1 sauce & BBQ pulled pork. Germany has “American Week” too THE EVIDENCE

          • rickflick
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:51 pm | Permalink

            That’s funny. The only thing they’re selling that looks remotely like it might be the genuine article is the marshmallows.
            “I don’t know what sandwich sauce is, … and it looks like mayonnaise that’s a little bit green.”

            I’m imagining Aldi execs talking over what to do with the old stuff in the back of the warehouse. I know! Let’s have “American Week”!

            • Michael Fisher
              Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:59 pm | Permalink

              Aldi are smart people – they pay the best hourly rates in the industry, work people hard, flat structure with even the managers expected to wheel the pallets into the shopping aisles, tear up boxes & re-stack shelves. Absolutely no frills & the fittest looking shop staff anywhere outside of an Alpine clothing shop.

              Their buyers are animals on shaving the pennies. Very sharp – if there’s a snow or frost due then a large selection of suitable tools & sprays & workwear turns up in exactly the right stores immediately to catch the forecast. All non-perishables are supplied FOC on SOR – no cost to Aldi & suppliers get paid 90 days [or 120 days if problems with returns etc.] from invoice. [In the UK this accepted, agreed practise of 90 days from invoice might not be allowed by law these days – it kills small businesses & it’s frowned upon. Not sure if the legislation went through.]

              With “America Week” they just go to their normal suppliers & tell them to produce a spec American range for approval in suitable packaging [Aldi supplies the style guide for colours, logo etc] & I suppose the suppliers bear all the risk. Suppliers will sell their families to get on the Aldi suppliers list – it’s very difficult to contact anyone working for Aldi if you’re on the outside – no published internal phone numbers nor email addresses. My local Aldi warehouse has no published phone number at all. The staff are not bothered by a zillion sales calls.

              If you know the European market you’ll see that nearly all the “American Week” products are just standard Euro stuff rebranded – identical apple pies are available all year round in exactly the same packaging, but without the US flag etc. It would be interesting to know what those distinctly iffy sauces are the rest of the non-American year!

              • rickflick
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:21 pm | Permalink

                Here in the States, Aldis is known as a place to get cheap vegetables and some foreign foods you can’t get elsewhere. We shopped there frequently because my wife is fond of cheap veggies. You can see lots of Asians shopping there. My wife is Asian.

              • Michael Fisher
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:54 pm | Permalink

                Their central aisle of non-food mysteries is a place of wonder – real bargains now & then among the cheapo dross. We are well served by fresh veg in the UK – there are few ‘food deserts’ unlike in the vast expanse of the USA, but even so Aldi are a couple of % cheaper in the veg for same quality. When I was on my uppers I went there for bags of apples & for the best priced rice & mega cheap frozen chipped potatoes [French fries].

                I avoid the rest of their stuff as it’s usually processed further than I’m happy with, although [as you say] some of the stuff from the Continent is great & cheap such as the chocolate & the jams/preserves.

                Aldi are shameless about almost exactly copying the packaging & name of well known brands of cereals, coffee, sweets [candy] & biscuits. I remember how upmarket Marks & Spencer launched “Percy Pig” fruit gums & Aldi immediately jumped in with “Horatio Hog” gums with the cheeky message “Pigs DO fly” on every pack. 🙂

          • Posted May 20, 2019 at 2:50 am | Permalink

            In Germany, Aldi first got big through the lean rebuilding years. Slowly, it became associated with the underclass — person with Aldi plastic bag was quite iconic for it. Buying there, and flaunting it with the white-blue bag was akin to admitting your place in society. But that changed long ago.

            Over time people got wind that Aldi sells expensive brands in cheap no-name disguise (which is actually true). Buying there became known as being smart. I can’t help to also see how it reflected the times and zeitgeist, because simultaneously through the later 80s and 90s, the housewives eventually vanished, and perhaps everyone had to mind a little how they spent their coins.

            That way Aldi became totally mainstream again, but also got lots of competition. These markets and actual harsh competition have resulted in Germans enjoying comparatively cheap grocery shopping.

            • Michael Fisher
              Posted May 20, 2019 at 3:57 am | Permalink

              Very interesting & Aldi still has the jump on their competition in a game with only 2% or 3% profit margin. Their first UK store was Stechford, Birmingham down the road from me with 600 lines – that was 1990. They’re opening loads of stores all over & their “Like Brands But Cheaper” is very successful & the comp can’t get their prices own to match.

              ** Classless customer base – a miracle in the UK
              ** Nearly all own brand products [90%!] in ‘look alike’ famous brand packaging [NOT from the famous brands as suggested elsewhere in this thread]
              ** They don’t do home delivery which every other major supermarket does in Europe/UK [for no or negative margin] – saves a fortune in warehousing, trucks, fuel, insurance drivers, breakages.
              ** Their 90 day invoice payments gives them cash flow & perhaps interest on the money markets
              ** All their sites are local secondary ones near bus routes & not in high rent malls
              ** No customer loyalty schemes
              ** Very basic, but highly focussed advertising
              ** Highly motivated staff on very good hourly rate with very low sickness figures [young staff]
              ** Only one, two or three brand choices of any product in most lines [except perhaps baked goods?] so they buy those brands in very high volume – competition might have 2 metre shelf length for baked beans varieties – not Aldi. Aldi has something like 1,500 to 2,000 lines whereas the comp has 20,000 to 30,000. There’s only one ketchup at Aldi’s
              ** Customers pack their own bags away from the tills
              ** Shelf filling is during sales hours by regular staff moving pallets into spaces on the sales floor – no overnight shelf filling by extra staff
              ** No fresh deli’s or butcher
              ** Most important Aldi branch metric is revenue divided by employee hours and there’s no decades old employee pension burden to speak of.

              What could possibly go wrong?

              • rickflick
                Posted May 20, 2019 at 8:12 am | Permalink

                These all sound like true facts. Here, they don’t give you free bags to drag home and wonder how to get rid of without choking a pelican. They expect you to bring your own. But they do keep a pile of cut open boxes near the door so you can use one of those in a pinch. Kinda trendy, wouldn’t you say?

              • Michael Fisher
                Posted May 20, 2019 at 8:29 am | Permalink

                Same here except for the boxes. They’ve trained the customers to bring their own trolley bags or buy the “bags for life” they have at the till. A long way to go on recycling packaging though – the black plastics for example.

        • darrelle
          Posted May 20, 2019 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

          The “pulled” in pulled pork refers to the way it is served. It is pulled apart. Often by hand, though also with a pair of forks or even purpose made claw like things. Pulled pork is typically a shoulder roast (for some reason called a “pork butt” even though it’s at the opposite end). It is a fairly fatty hunk of meat that is highly suitable for long slow cooking. In order to be able to effectively “pull” the roast it must be cooked to the proper temperature, 190 degrees F. Less well done will not fall apart as is necessary for pulling but is suitable for slicing.

          I smoke a mean butt. Liberally coat a bone in pork butt, or two, with my secret rub recipe, wrap in plastic wrap and store in the frig for at least a day. Smoke over charcoal and hickory until done, making sure the temperature of the smoker stays between 200 and 220. Throughout the smoking I may add beer, wine, vinegar, or any combination thereof to the water pan (used as a moderator between the coals and the meat). When done allow to rest 30-60 minutes then pull. Typically I’ll pull some from different parts of the roast, sprinkle with juice that has accumulated in the resting pan and some additional rub, toss and then move to the serving dish, then repeat until all of the meat has been pulled. Even impressed my chef neighbor. He said my pork was “a work of love.”

      • merilee
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:11 pm | Permalink

        What’s wrong with pulled pork??

        • Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:44 pm | Permalink

          Nothing really, just its sudden unexplained and ubiquitous presence in a non-English speaking country!

          • merilee
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:55 pm | Permalink

            No, I was responding to Michael, who I thought at raised the original objection to pulled pork??

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:01 pm | Permalink

          Pulled pork sounds salacious.

          • merilee
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:40 pm | Permalink

            But it is tasty🤓

        • Filippo
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 8:43 pm | Permalink

          I find it difficult to push away a plate of pulled pork.

        • Michael Fisher
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:33 pm | Permalink

          What’s wrong with pulled pork you ask. I’ve not had it off the BBQ where I imagine it comes to life, so to speak.

          I’ve had it in sarnies, in ready meals & even out of a can & it was dull with very little Ma[i]llard reaction umami thingy & not much texture to it. A crunchy, semi-burnt pork chop with apple sauce is much nicer. I’m being unfair though & seek out fresh BBQ pulled pork to see if it’s betterer. 🙂

          • rickflick
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:53 pm | Permalink

            You’ve got to give pulled pork a fair shake. “The slow cooker yields tender meat that’s just right for these pulled-pork sandwiches. … Trim excess fat from pork roast. … Return pork to slow cooker and stir in barbecue sauce.”
            Mmmmmmm…

            • Michael Fisher
              Posted May 19, 2019 at 10:01 pm | Permalink

              Yes I will do that. BBQ sauce does cover a lot of sins though – how does pulled pork stand up unadorned?

              • merilee
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:13 pm | Permalink

                Very tender, but liking some “adornment”. Great in tacos and enchilades.

              • darrelle
                Posted May 20, 2019 at 3:04 pm | Permalink

                Depends entirely on the preparation. Done right it needs no sauce whatsoever. Though there’s nothing wrong with a good sauce.

          • merilee
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:10 pm | Permalink

            Sarnie=sandwich?

            • Michael Fisher
              Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:11 pm | Permalink

              yes

      • Posted May 20, 2019 at 1:10 pm | Permalink

        Gee haven’t had a such long reply thread on one of my comments here since the time when I compared Jordan Peterson to Deepak Chopra. The responses here are at least far more interesting & sensible!

    • Ken Kukec
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:19 pm | Permalink

      There’s no excuse for using “quiz” under such circumstances when “query,” or the old copy standby “brace,” work much better.

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:54 pm | Permalink

        I’m envisioning the lexicographical confusion that would result after the re-popularisation of “bracing”, when an offer of splicing the mainbrace is made.

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:00 pm | Permalink

      And here I was thinking it was a slang euphemism for Catholic birth control. Coitus interrupotus.

      (A dirty mind is a terrible thing to waste 🙂

      cr

  18. Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

    “Chilax” is so disgusting that it can only be offset by eternal neurosis.

    • Ken Kukec
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:13 pm | Permalink

      “Eternal Neurosis” is the name for my new thrash metal band. Thanks.

      • Diana MacPherson
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:02 pm | Permalink

        Chilax should be your first song. I can already hear the throaty belting out of “Chillaaaaaax” and the deep back up of the guitars.

  19. Steve Pollard
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:23 pm | Permalink

    Sticking my neck out here, but…

    I do dislike the (largely) American tendency to add unnecessary prepositions to statements. For instance, ‘beat’ many years ago became ‘beat up’, which has now become ‘beat up on’. ‘Hate’ has become ‘hate on’. ‘Outside’ is now almost always ‘outside of’. It gets on (sorry, ‘up onto’) my tits.

    • Filippo
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 8:51 pm | Permalink

      I’ve noticed that “kind of” is used more and frequently (especially by interviewees on NPR) in describing the doing of something. What does it mean – half-way? There are some human activities that are either done or not done, much like electrons jumping or dropping to specific energy levels.

      • Diana MacPherson
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:26 pm | Permalink

        Ugh. I hear myself say that verbal tic & I’m trying to break myself of the habit.

      • merilee
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:04 pm | Permalink

        Like kind of pregnant?

    • Jenny Haniver
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 10:25 pm | Permalink

      Don’t forget “swap out” for “exchange” or plain old “swap”?

      I’m American and I scratched my head over that for a long time. I was convinced there must be some special nuance that I was oblivious to but no, we just gotta add that “out” when “swap out” should just drop out of common parlance.

      • Michael Fisher
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 10:37 pm | Permalink

        I agree generally with you about the usage of “swap out” & “swap in” – possibly it has some utility only in computing to describe the process of exchanging data between hard disk & RAM, but it’s also known as “swapping” in that application so maybe it’s superfluous there too. Can’t decide.

        • Jenny Haniver
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:03 pm | Permalink

          Do you think “swapped out” originated as IT jargon?

          I just came across this phrase in a discussion of “swappiness” “swappiness=0 tells the kernel to avoid swapping processes out of physical memory for as long as possible. For Kernel version 3.5 and newer it disables swapiness.”

          I have no idea what any of this means but I see “..swapping processes out of physical memory… and I wonder if this kind of IT usage gave rise to the collapsed articulation, which has then become ubiquitous as a redundant synonym?

          I do like “swappiness”.

          • Michael Fisher
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:32 pm | Permalink

            “Swappiness” is lovely – not heard it before.

            I think “swap in/out” must indeed originate in IT jargon as you suggest & in that context it’s sensible because we are describing the movement of a specific set of bits from one memory medium to another [changing physical address & address ‘name’], whereas in the superfluous usage to “swap out” an ink cartridge, or a battery is when the original is worn or consumed & it’s replaced with a fresh consumable item.

            In the case of memory nothing is being replaced necessarily – it’s being moved in or out to a new address on a different physical medium. Though now I think about it there is also virtual swapping where the physical address changes, but that’s hidden from the CPU which only ‘sees’ all the memory media as one bloc…

            Stolen from HERE:

            origin In computer speak, to move information from fast-access memory to a slower storage device, e.g. disk (“swap out”) or the other way around (“swap in.”)

            This often refers to loading data from disk into memory as needed (swapping in) and writing the data back to disk when it is no longer needed (swapping out.)

            …to move information between one’s memory and some other source of information, e.g. a book. (These respectively correspond to “fast-access memory” and “slower storage” referred to in the “origin” section below.)

            To keep something “swapped in” is to keep it fresh in one’s memory. To “swap something out” is to write it down before you forget. To “have swapped something out” is to have forgotten it because – in theory – some other information overwrote it in one’s brain.

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:07 pm | Permalink

          I say it in context of “swap out the hard drive”. Take out one hard drive and replace it with another. Something is coming out. So it makes sense to me.

      • merilee
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:15 pm | Permalink

        +1

      • Thanny
        Posted May 23, 2019 at 12:33 pm | Permalink

        There’s nothing wrong with swap out and swap in. Both involve an exchange of items, but the additional term makes clear why the exchange is happening, and which direction of the change is the important one.

        For example, you swap out defective hardware. That tells you why the swap is taking place, and what the important part of the exchange is – taking out the bad part.

        Conversely, if you have working hardware but wish to replace it with something that is better in some important way (faster, higher capacity, etc.), then you swap in the new hardware. The important part of that exchange is adding the new and improved part.

        In IT, these meanings are well understood. So if I tell you that I’m going to “swap out a hard drive”, without any further explanation, you know both what I’m doing and why – there’s a defective drive, and it needs to be replaced with a working drive. And if I’m going to “swap in some RAM”, you know that I’m not replacing defective memory, but putting in new memory that has higher speed and/or higher capacity. Simply using “swap in” or “swap out” instead of just “swap” makes these things clear without having to explicitly state that something is defective or simply new and improved.

  20. Ken Kukec
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:26 pm | Permalink

    One I’ve carped about before in similar posts, I think, is “gift” as a verb. It might have some slight connotation beyond “give,” but I’ve never seen or heard it used when that connotation wasn’t readily apparent from context. (“The Smiths gifted the university endowment with a large contribution.”)

    That said, I do like “regift,” especially when used sardonically. There isn’t another one-word synonym for the concept, that I can think of anyway.

    • Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:47 pm | Permalink

      Yes — gifted is absurd. Why not ‘gived’ instead if they want to be like that?

      • Diana MacPherson
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:14 pm | Permalink

        It’s passive too….and hides the fact that it most likely refers to being gifted by god. There should be an amusing science equivalent like a play on evolution – eviled. Ha ha.

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:05 pm | Permalink

      I agree, should be ‘gave’. ‘Gift’ is just pretentious.

      But I also accept ‘re-gift’ since it’s quite specific to re-using of a gift, and as you say, there isn’t a synonym.

      cr

    • Steve Pollard
      Posted May 20, 2019 at 4:24 pm | Permalink

      I believe ‘gift’ is an old Scots word that came into wider usage about 100 years ago.

  21. BJ
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:27 pm | Permalink

    I find “impactful” to be useful in certain cases. There are certain sentences and events where it just fits better than something else. For example, if you’re talking about boxing and someone just threw the biggest punch of the fight, you could say it was the most “effective,” but that word could mean tons of different things in boxing. You could say “biggest,” but that could also apply to multiple types of punches. If you use “impactful,” it’s clear that you mean the punch that most affected the other fighter.

    • Ken Kukec
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:26 pm | Permalink

      Neighborhood I grew up in, anyone who used a word like “impactful” about a punch, could expect to get punched himself. 🙂

  22. Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:44 pm | Permalink

    These words all have one thing in common. Their use seemingly originates in the USA.
    It’s my humble opinion that the USA leads all other English speaking nations in inventing new forms of words or altering their sense (such and turning nouns into verbs).
    It’s not that other nations don’t, or that it hasn’t been a historical practise across many nations, but the USA, perhaps through its mass media, seems to delight in this practise.
    Using a new form of a word seems like a (misguided) badge of cleverness.

    • revelator60
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:23 pm | Permalink

      You’re on to something. Speaking as a proud American, I regret to say that my country is engaged in a Jihad against the English language. For the past couple of decades America has been flooding the world with degraded English, whether it’s mind-numbing management-speak or the unspeakably ugly neologisms of academia or the sub-literate bilge spawned by internet junkies. Even spoken English is unspeakably degraded in America—the primary vocabulary words will be eventually reduced to “shit” and “fuckin'”. It wasn’t always this way—in the 30s and 40s American English was a glorious thing and gave the world an immeasurable wealth of pungent slang and witty wisecracks. But sometime afterward we stopped taking collective pride in how we used our language.

      • merilee
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:16 pm | Permalink

        Not to mention, like, the like Huge number of likes impacting all sentences😬

      • Filippo
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 8:57 pm | Permalink

        Lewis Lapham remarked that the average high school vocabulary of fifty or so years ago was 12,000 words, and that nowadays it’s 6,000.

        I guess blame that (also) on the teachers. (“My teacher should have MADE me. . . .”)

        • rickflick
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:13 pm | Permalink

          “nowadays it’s 6,000”

          Well, possibly. But I suspect Lapham discounts new vocabularies and wants us to return to the 1960s. He’s 84 years old.

          • Filippo
            Posted May 20, 2019 at 8:53 pm | Permalink

            “He is 84.”

            I take it that Lapham is past a certain unspecified age of some unspecified (ir-)relevance?

            • rickflick
              Posted May 20, 2019 at 9:35 pm | Permalink

              No, I don’t think age itself disqualify him. It’s just an indication of why he might be tied to an older cultural milieu. Language changes rapidly. He may not recognize that the vocabulary of the younger generation is as effective as that of his own era. On the other hand, I’m sympathetic with maintaining high standards.

              • Michael Fisher
                Posted May 20, 2019 at 9:46 pm | Permalink

                Lapham’s the old geezer who wrote a review & it was published [in Harpers?] before the event occurred – a common noob/rookie mistake he managed to delay until his middle years. A bit of a wally. 🙂

              • Filippo
                Posted May 21, 2019 at 8:44 pm | Permalink

                Per Michael Fisher:

                “Lapham’s the old geezer who wrote a review & it was published [in Harpers?] before the event occurred – a common noob/rookie mistake he managed to delay until his middle years. A bit of a wally.”

                I take it you wish to live long enough to qualify as a “geezer”?

                And forgive me, I’m a provincial rube. Pray tell, what is a “wally”? I’m guessing, a colorful Australian idiom? Apparently more than “a bit,” else why make mention of it?

              • Michael Fisher
                Posted May 21, 2019 at 9:19 pm | Permalink

                Geezer = Brit English & is unrelated to age hereabouts in the Midlands UK. It means approx. fussily unconventional/eccentric adult male subject of derision for his ways. That’s how one can be an “old geezer” rather than just a “geezer.” As one hits Greater London it can mean an older male fusspot or it can just be an affectionate greeting between males.

                “Wally” = Brit term meaning a male who is inept in some aspect of their behaviour, such as filing a made up generic story for an event that hasn’t happened yet or not researching idioms, but drawing conclusions based on guesswork. That kind of thing. LOL.

              • merilee
                Posted May 21, 2019 at 9:57 pm | Permalink

                Lapham was, in general, an excellent editor of Harper’s, to which I have subscribed continuously (continually? -always mix those two up- anyway, non-stop) since 1964.

              • Michael Fisher
                Posted May 21, 2019 at 10:12 pm | Permalink

                I recall his “Notebook” columns in Harper’s – I often agreed with the gist of what he wrote, but generally I found his style unbearably verbose & he takes too damned long to get to the destination. The New Yorker has the same effect on me. 🙂

              • merilee
                Posted May 21, 2019 at 10:24 pm | Permalink

                I enjoyed his verbosity: kind of a liberal Wm. F. Buckley.

              • Michael Fisher
                Posted May 21, 2019 at 9:26 pm | Permalink

                P.S. I qualify as an old geezer & rickflick too, but he’s got a decade on me so he’d be an even olderer geezer I reckon. 🙂

              • merilee
                Posted May 21, 2019 at 10:03 pm | Permalink

                Maybe an olderer geezerer? Is there a female equivalent?

              • Michael Fisher
                Posted May 21, 2019 at 10:14 pm | Permalink

                Nah, women aren’t foolish objects of fun like the olderer geezer can be.

              • merilee
                Posted May 21, 2019 at 10:25 pm | Permalink

                🤓

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted May 22, 2019 at 5:32 pm | Permalink

                Not exactly parallel but my favourite female insults are “scrag” and “seahag”.

              • merilee
                Posted May 22, 2019 at 8:24 pm | Permalink

                Scrag, not scag?

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted May 22, 2019 at 8:25 pm | Permalink

                No it’s scrag. As in “You look like a scrag”. We said that to each other or described ourselves that way all the time as teens.

              • merilee
                Posted May 22, 2019 at 8:33 pm | Permalink

                Must be Canuck?

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted May 22, 2019 at 8:42 pm | Permalink

                Don’t think so. I think other English speaking countries use it too. It’s not like gotchies or mickey (of liquor) which are totally Canuck.

              • rickflick
                Posted May 21, 2019 at 10:25 pm | Permalink

                “olderer geezerer”

                I’m comfortable with that. 😎

      • Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:06 pm | Permalink

        Two nations (UK and the USA) divided by a common language. A. Waugh, I believe.
        Not so much these days though.

  23. pintohaus
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:53 pm | Permalink

    How on earth did we get by before “visualization” arrived on the scene? David Pinto 

  24. Paul Matthews
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 3:58 pm | Permalink

    A language-related phenomenon that’s really starting to get on my nerves is the overuse of the present tense.

    I first remember noticing it in sports commentary, for example “if he slides he’s safe” in baseball, instead of “if he had slid, he would have been safe”. I think I’d even prefer the still wrong but closer-to-correct “if he would have slid …” than the wholesale use of the present.

    Now, in addition to the above, the simple past seems to increasingly be jettisoned in favour of the present. There’s a ubiquitous radio/tv interviewer and host here in Ontario who’s generally quite good but who’s constantly guilty of this abuse of the English language. Just today I heard her interviewing someone about this person’s past. “So you’re fourteen” instead of “So you were fourteen”; “so you are constantly sick” instead of “so you were constantly sick”. I had to turn the radio off. Using the appropriate tense is actually useful for clarity.

    • Ken Kukec
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:42 pm | Permalink

      In linguistic terms, I think that’s known as the “historical present.”

      It’s overused (especially in journalism), but has a pretty solid literary pedigree. It lends immediacy to writing, but, should the writer wish to address events occurring other than in a single time frame, things can quickly get bogged down in perfect tenses. (“So you’re fourteen, having had been thirteen the year before and having had been twelve the year before that …”)

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:09 pm | Permalink

        See Damon Runyon for the ultimate in consistent use of the present tense. It is said he never uses a past tense, yet he always manages to avoid confusion. (I found two past participles in his collected stories, but I’m guessing they were typos).

        cr

  25. Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:08 pm | Permalink

    It’s true that haters don’t disappear when this word is used to mock them but that can’t be blamed on the word. Lots of things continue to bug me though I mock them regularly.

  26. Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:12 pm | Permalink

    I feel like some white people are attempting to minoritize themselves: pretending to be an oppressed minority when, in fact, they’re actually still the majority and enjoy privilege.

  27. Historian
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:25 pm | Permalink

    I despise “deep dive” for analyzing a topic beyond the superficial.

    • Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:27 pm | Permalink

      Agreed – much like the aforementioned “unpack”.

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:58 pm | Permalink

      Boil the ocean. That’s the phrase I hate! Your reference to “deep dive” made me think of that because if you simply describe a complex situation to set up how you will go about solving it, some schmuck has to chime in, before you’ve gotten to the solving part, with “well let’s not boil the ocean”. My favourite is when they say something like, “let’s not boil the ocean; we’re not trying to solve world hunger here”. Oh mix metaphors much? How would boiling the ocean solve world hunger – would it provide a lot of cooked fish?!

      • merilee
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:01 pm | Permalink

        I am thankful that I have not-as-yet been exposed to any ocean-boiling.

  28. Christopher
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:41 pm | Permalink

    I dislike the word (or contraction of words) “innit” (if that’s how it’s spelled) used by many youths in the UK and I heartily agree with the sentiments expressed about SJWs adding the suffix -ize to the end of words.

    • merilee
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:18 pm | Permalink

      You mean “yoofs”, innit?

  29. Roger
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:48 pm | Permalink

    Petunia. I don’t know who invented that word but it’s hilarious. Beautiful flowers should not be hilarious.

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:59 pm | Permalink

      Like Begonia — it just makes you hope they will die so you can say, “sadly, the begonias are begone.”

      • Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:26 pm | Permalink

        “sadly, the begonias are begone.”

        Nice one, Diana! Or should I say “w00t!”?

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:40 pm | Permalink

          Ha ha! Just don’t unpack it.

          • Jenny Haniver
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:27 pm | Permalink

            Oh dear, I just unpacked it immediately below, and it is quite impactful.

            • Diana MacPherson
              Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:52 pm | Permalink

              No!

      • Jenny Haniver
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:25 pm | Permalink

        Little did you realize that indeed, the begonias are begon before and baft.

        “mid 18th century: modern Latin, named in honor of the French administrator and amateur botanist Michel Bégon (1638–1710) by the botanist Charles Plumier (1646–1704), who discovered the plant on the island of Santo Domingo.”

        Thus: Bégon begonia begone.

        Plumier is a wonderful surname.

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:49 pm | Permalink

          Plumier Is pretty good and makes me think of the song Alouette, Gentille Alouette which we sang as kids.

          However, I’ve always enjoyed the surname, Savage.

    • Filippo
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 8:23 pm | Permalink

      Don’t forget Nasturtium.

  30. Posted May 19, 2019 at 4:56 pm | Permalink

    Why utilize utilize when you can use use?

  31. Christopher
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:16 pm | Permalink

    I forgot one that I just don’t get at all but I read an article, I think on MLB, about a game won by a player’s “socked dong”…

    I assume they meant home run, at least I sure hope so!

  32. infiniteimprobabilit
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 5:49 pm | Permalink

    Agree about ‘impactful’.

    Also ‘dragged’, but even more I dislike ‘throw shade on’. Is that supposed to be a bad thing? In about half the world’s situations, shade is a *good* and welcome thing, sheltering you from the heat. So it’s a particularly inept and inappropriate simile.

    Even when used in its pejorative sense, it is still misleading: Someone who ‘steals the limelight’ might well be ‘throwing shade on’ (overshadowing) me, but only because they want to be in the spotlight instead, they couldn’t care less about me. This is not, apparently, the sense that the phrase is used in these days.

    cr

  33. gravelinspector-Aidan
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:02 pm | Permalink

    Did we get this far without mentioning that paragon of insightful prediction of literary and philosophical trends that is “Idiocracy”.

  34. Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:24 pm | Permalink

    Thank you for gifting us this post.

  35. infiniteimprobabilit
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 6:36 pm | Permalink

    My all-time pet hate – ‘reporters’ who perpetrate ‘sentences’ without a validly constructed verb in them.

    ‘The hurricane causing extensive destruction in Florida, neighboring states issuing hurricane warnings’
    ‘The military jet crashing into a warehouse, the pilot ejecting before impact’

    (My wife gets quite annoyed at me for screaming at the screen “Learn f@#%&ing English, you stupid morons!”)

    I hope it’s a fad that dies out as fast as Gangnam style.

    OK, that’s probably my limit for this thread.

    cr

    • Ken Kukec
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 7:02 pm | Permalink

      Wait, what? Gangnam style is over?

      • Ken Kukec
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 7:04 pm | Permalink

        Psy, we hardly knew ye.

        • merilee
          Posted May 19, 2019 at 7:10 pm | Permalink

          Psy?

          • Diana MacPherson
            Posted May 19, 2019 at 7:54 pm | Permalink

            Hahaha Ken was more hip.

            • merilee
              Posted May 19, 2019 at 10:59 pm | Permalink

              What am I missing??

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:08 pm | Permalink

                Psy is the artist who sings Gangnam Style

              • merilee
                Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:20 pm | Permalink

                Oh, right. I had forgotten that🤓 I was imagining some psych joke.

      • merilee
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 7:09 pm | Permalink

        Yup, thst’s why people look at you funny when you gallop down the street…

  36. Posted May 19, 2019 at 8:16 pm | Permalink

    Warren J. Blumenfeld, Social Justice writer

    Is that an actual job title now, like ‘cruise director’ or ‘past lives guide’?

    • Filippo
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:04 pm | Permalink

      Maybe he’s also a “lived experience” writer. Pray tell, what experience is not lived?

      • rickflick
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:14 pm | Permalink

        Dreamed.

      • Diana MacPherson
        Posted May 19, 2019 at 9:28 pm | Permalink

        I’m looking forward to a SJW version of the Love Boat.

  37. Filippo
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 8:21 pm | Permalink

    “Positionalities” in “Color-Blindness is Denial” is a new one for me.

    I guess “positions” doesn’t quite cut it.

  38. Posted May 19, 2019 at 8:31 pm | Permalink

    Well you’re just a hater on those words! 🙂

    -Ryan

  39. Matt Foley
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 10:24 pm | Permalink

    “Hating on” as in “Why are you hating on me?”.

    “Could of” instead of “could’ve”.

    • Matt Foley
      Posted May 19, 2019 at 10:34 pm | Permalink

      Trump often says “I feel badly” and it’s always wrong. It’s “I feel bad.” Just as it’s “I feel happy” not “I feel happily.”

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted May 20, 2019 at 1:08 am | Permalink

        I thought tRump happily felt a lot of things. Including pussies.

        😎

        cr

      • Posted May 20, 2019 at 1:49 pm | Permalink

        I think Trump is just admitting that he’s not very good at feeling.

  40. Posted May 19, 2019 at 10:29 pm | Permalink

    “Play-date” and “date night”. The way it is used makes everything seems so artificially pre-planned. Enough of life seems that way already.

  41. Wayne Y Hoskisson
    Posted May 19, 2019 at 11:16 pm | Permalink

    If some people have been minoritized does that mean some have been majoritized?

  42. stephen castleden
    Posted May 20, 2019 at 5:32 am | Permalink

    My nieces use the word ‘verse’ or ‘versing’.

    e.g. “Who did you verse?” or “Who were you versing”

    I hate it!

    Can’t believe it hasn’t been mentioned yet, is it passe or just an Australian thing.

    • Michael Fisher
      Posted May 20, 2019 at 6:13 am | Permalink

      Versus & Versing: The Australian Writer’s Centre reckons the confusion re “who are you versing” – meaning “who are you versus” in a competition, was first documented in the early ’80s in New York.

      The theory is the Aussie iteration of this error is from online gaming culture where misspellings become fixed [or sometimes the source misspelling is recognised, but deliberately preserved]. An example that I’ve seen for years on Discord & earlier gaming message boards is “rekt” meaning a player got thoroughly beaten in a game or “wrecked.” Misspelling correctly indicates you’re part of the tribe & not a pretender – you really don’t want to misspell a misspelling or you’ll end up with a credibility deficit. 🙂

      • rickflick
        Posted May 20, 2019 at 8:28 am | Permalink

        My credibility deficit is already crashed. I must be be passed rekt already.

    • merilee
      Posted May 20, 2019 at 7:56 am | Permalink

      Never heard it? What does it mean?

  43. Posted May 20, 2019 at 6:12 am | Permalink

    It’s sort of in line with your 4 … but I have an issue with the term ‘free speech’. It’s not that I object to the concept in principle but just that people cite this ‘right’ to say all manner of horrific things. Such people normally respond to any gentle criticism with the term, “Well! That’s just political correctness gone mad!”
    I don’t mind ‘dragged’ though. Would ‘drug’ be better?

  44. Posted May 20, 2019 at 8:01 am | Permalink

    The failure of even educated people to use the plural form of the verb ‘to be’!

    • Matt Foley
      Posted May 20, 2019 at 9:58 am | Permalink

      Speaking of failure, how about those who use “fail” as a noun?

  45. merilee
    Posted May 20, 2019 at 2:24 pm | Permalink

    Signage for sign(s)

  46. Posted May 20, 2019 at 3:33 pm | Permalink

    Influencers. The people are worse than the word.

  47. infiniteimprobabilit
    Posted May 21, 2019 at 1:34 am | Permalink

    Just came across one that really grinds my gears – ‘spend’ used as a noun. As in ‘a 15 million dollar spend’. AAAAAAAAAAARRRGGGHHHH!!!

    What’s wrong with ‘expenditure’ or ‘cost’?

    cr

  48. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted May 21, 2019 at 5:05 pm | Permalink

    Vegan

  49. merilee
    Posted May 23, 2019 at 6:56 pm | Permalink

    Switched UP🤯. I guess I can be convinced by swapped in or out, but there seems to be no justification for the up.

    Why is WordPress suddenly playing silly buggers again and requiring all my info??

  50. merilee
    Posted May 23, 2019 at 6:56 pm | Permalink

    Switched UP🤯. I guess I can be convinced by swapped in or out, but there seems to be no justification for the up.

    Why is WordPress suddenly playing silly buggers again and requiring all my info??


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