Readers’ wildlife photographs

Time to think about sending me photos again; seven dollops a week really lowers the tank.  And if you’re reader Peter Ayling, please contact me, as I seem to have no copies of the photos you sent.

Today we have some lovely photos from reader Terry Milewski, who has appeared on this site before (see link below, which contains this video).

Retired Canadian journalist here – the one you blogged about a couple years back being snotty with a cabinet minister about Islamophobia. It seems you’re low on wildlife so, if it helps, help yourself to any of mine from our cottage on Lac Barnes in the woods of Val-des-Monts, Quebec.

They’re here and most are captioned with the right names, I think. Too many to e-mail but download at will if any take your fancy. You seem to be, um, OK for ducks but you’ll see a lot of loons, e.g….

(JAC: I’ve made a selection of photos from Terry’s Lac Barnes Wildlife site.)

…although L. Barnes is small and only supports one pair of loons at a time. Any second pair trying to settle in is driven off. See, we don’t take kindly to no strangers in these parts. Even so, only twice in the past seven years have any young loons survived to have their pictures taken.

You’ll see we also have herons, mergansers, sundry other ducks, hummingbirds, snakes and turtles of at least two flavours – Snapping (Chelydra serpentina) and Painted (Chrysemys picta.) Each laid eggs near the water this year. Plus, we have a variety of frogs, some burly beavers and a profusion of interesting insects.

 

16 Comments

  1. John Crisp
    Posted December 14, 2018 at 7:34 am | Permalink

    Gorgeous!

  2. Randall Schenck
    Posted December 14, 2018 at 8:03 am | Permalink

    Lots of great photos. Thanks for that.

  3. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted December 14, 2018 at 8:11 am | Permalink

    Favorites : loon pics. Is that shaggy one also a loon? Beautiful.

    Rest are delightful- lots of work for these I bet.

    • rickflick
      Posted December 14, 2018 at 8:12 am | Permalink

      The brown shaggy one is a merganser.

      • Claudia Baker
        Posted December 14, 2018 at 10:03 am | Permalink

        Yup, female merganser.

  4. rickflick
    Posted December 14, 2018 at 8:12 am | Permalink

    I had a look at the web site and was delighted to see more great shots. Thanks for submitting.

  5. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted December 14, 2018 at 8:13 am | Permalink

    I have to emphasize the lovely color blends on that one loon pic – the red eye – the water – beautiful!

  6. Posted December 14, 2018 at 10:09 am | Permalink

    Gorgeous! Absolutely gorgeous pictures. And I love loons. Thank you for posting, Terry!

  7. Mark Sturtevant
    Posted December 14, 2018 at 10:18 am | Permalink

    Beautiful stuff! Enjoyed looking at your site as well.
    The dragonfly I think is the four-spotted skimmer (ibellula quadrimaculata). The larva is the pine sawfly larva (Diprion similis), which is the larva of a non-stinging wasp that looks remarkably like a caterpillar by convergent evolution.

    So.. Google photos. I should check into it when I fill out my free quota on Flickr.

  8. Bruce Lyon
    Posted December 14, 2018 at 10:30 am | Permalink

    The loons are stunning and I love the turtle egg being laid. Looks like a ping pong ball!

  9. Posted December 14, 2018 at 11:00 am | Permalink

    Beautiful pictures! The ones with the babies on their backs are my favs. Are those some variety of swan in the last bird pic?

    • Posted December 14, 2018 at 11:30 am | Permalink

      Canadian geese.

      • Diane G
        Posted December 15, 2018 at 1:42 am | Permalink

        Canada Geese, actually. 😉

  10. Posted December 14, 2018 at 11:38 am | Permalink

    Quite near here – in the most generic of places (“valley of the hills”?)

  11. Posted December 14, 2018 at 7:12 pm | Permalink

    Thank you very much! Simply beautiful. Made my day.

    Thanks also to the other photographers who shared their great work these many months.

  12. Posted December 15, 2018 at 10:37 am | Permalink

    The turtle looks rooted in earth.


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