Readers’ wildlife photos

We have some photos by two people today. The first is from reader Gilbert Klapper, who send birds and antelopes.  His notes are indented:

Here are three photos of brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) taken in Key West in 2017.

Here are two from Yellowstone Park taken in 2005: Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis) and a Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana). Not “photoshopped.”

And three Idaho landscapes from Stephen Barnard:

 

25 Comments

  1. Posted December 5, 2018 at 7:51 am | Permalink

    Excellent pictures by both photographers!

  2. Ruthann L. Richards
    Posted December 5, 2018 at 8:42 am | Permalink

    Thank you to these photographers for giving the locations where the photos were taken. Often there is no hint of even a general location (northwest U.S., for example). Readers of these posts might like to go to some of the locations or at least read more about them, but cannot when they are not given!

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted December 5, 2018 at 3:07 pm | Permalink

      A quick look at the images does not reveal any GPS or other location data, but that may be because (1) it wasn’t recorded by the camera (a Canon whose other details I didn’t note) or an add-on, or (2) WordPress strips such data between the upload and the publish. The latter is, I believe, a tactic used by Facebook who I assume keep the location data for themselves but by default don’t send it too users. At least not since some messy or fatal consequences whose details I forget.

      • Posted December 5, 2018 at 4:05 pm | Permalink

        I don’t include GPS in the metadata, and I encourage everyone else to do the same. (A favorite New Zealand trout-fishing guide got into an embarrassing fix that way, giving up prime spots to foreign intruders).

        • rickflick
          Posted December 5, 2018 at 9:12 pm | Permalink

          Keep talking. I’m trying to get a fix…
          😎

        • gravelinspector-Aidan
          Posted December 6, 2018 at 6:16 pm | Permalink

          Knowing of the potential problem is half – maybe more – of the problem.
          Which will do nothing to abate the flood of camera-phone images posted hourly to InsterTindr or GrindrFace leaking information about the poster’s location.

  3. Posted December 5, 2018 at 8:42 am | Permalink

    Lovely pictures.
    In the Idaho landscapes what is the purpose or significance of the fence with the circular spacers? I am not familiar with this type of fence or indeed is it actually a fence?
    Help please.

    • Posted December 5, 2018 at 8:52 am | Permalink

      It’s not a fence. It’s a wheel line for irrigation. The moose and elk can jump over it with ease. In fact, I have a video of one of these moose jumping it a few minutes after I shot the photo.

      • Posted December 5, 2018 at 8:55 am | Permalink

        Thank you for the explanation, now makes sense. Looks quite delicate though, but it obviously serves the purpose.

        • Posted December 5, 2018 at 7:23 pm | Permalink

          It’s pretty delicate, mostly aluminum. The elk are more of a problem than the moose.

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted December 5, 2018 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

      I was trying to figure that too.

  4. rickflick
    Posted December 5, 2018 at 9:13 am | Permalink

    We see the Great white pelican here in Idaho. Very similar except for color. They are wonderful to watch. They fly and glide easily and dip for fish with their gigantic beaks.

  5. rickflick
    Posted December 5, 2018 at 9:16 am | Permalink

    Nice landscapes Stephen. The snow really sets off those mountains.

  6. Debbie Coplan
    Posted December 5, 2018 at 9:19 am | Permalink

    Thank you! So nice to wake up to these photos.

  7. Posted December 5, 2018 at 10:27 am | Permalink

    The sunrise landscape is like an impressionist painting. Stunning.

    • Terry Lynne Pedersen
      Posted December 5, 2018 at 12:27 pm | Permalink

      sub

    • Posted December 5, 2018 at 4:16 pm | Permalink

      I’m assuming you’re referring to the last photo, darwinwins. It’s a sunset photo. That’s an important distinction. The atmospheric effect is due to cool water from the creek evaporating into the warmer late afternoon air.

      • Posted December 5, 2018 at 5:22 pm | Permalink

        Ah, thanks Stephen.

        Strangely, the picture evokes a different feeling now that I know it is a sunset.

        • Posted December 5, 2018 at 7:14 pm | Permalink

          I’m remiss in praising the brave readers who send wildlife photos and videos to WEIT. Be assured, I look forward to them every morning.

  8. Posted December 5, 2018 at 10:46 am | Permalink

    Some absolutely stunning stuff! Thank you for sharing! 🙂 ❤

  9. Mark R.
    Posted December 5, 2018 at 12:36 pm | Permalink

    I love the big-horn and pronghorn shots…Wyoming natives. There are actually more pronghorn in Wyoming than humans.

    Lovely landscapes…prompting me to say: brrrrrr.

    • Diane G
      Posted December 5, 2018 at 10:47 pm | Permalink

      Too bad they can’t vote…

  10. Posted December 5, 2018 at 7:54 pm | Permalink

    Thanks for brightening my day, Gentlemen! So good!

    Stephen, your landscape photos are always sublime.

  11. Diane G
    Posted December 5, 2018 at 10:51 pm | Permalink

    Great animal portraits and stunning landscapes–thanks Gilbert & Stephen!


Post a Comment

Required fields are marked *
*
*

%d bloggers like this: