Readers’ wildlife photos

Reader Dick Kleinknecht sent some bird photos, which are better than he makes out in the apologetic notes below. I’ll leave you to identify them.

I have sent photos before of interesting activities by wildlife, but these aren’t very exciting,  Their chief claim to fame is they were all taken from inside my house or on the back deck.  We live near the boundary between forest and civilization so there is quite a sampling of birds and furry critters to watch during the year.

They were taken from my home in King county, about 25 miles southeast of Seattle.  Near the forest/civilization boundary, which is in the foothills of the western slope of the Cascade Mountains.

 

14 Comments

  1. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted November 28, 2018 at 8:08 am | Permalink

    Love it!

  2. Blue
    Posted November 28, 2018 at 8:33 am | Permalink

    O my, Mr Kleinknecht, these are just precious !
    Such color !

    Blue

  3. Posted November 28, 2018 at 9:37 am | Permalink

    On the contrary, the pictures are very interesting. I live in the city of Seattle proper and I do not see as much variety in birds. I must get out of the city more.

  4. rickflick
    Posted November 28, 2018 at 10:11 am | Permalink

    Bullock’s Oriole
    Great Blue Heron
    Gold Finch
    Black-headed Grosbeak
    Downy Woodpecker
    Unknown red-head
    Nuthatch
    Piliated woodpecker
    House finch
    Steller’s jay
    Tree swallow

    • Blue
      Posted November 28, 2018 at 10:53 am | Permalink

      Oooo, Mr rickflick, .that. is g o o o o d !

      Blue

      • rickflick
        Posted November 28, 2018 at 12:39 pm | Permalink

        Don’t mail the check right away. Others will wade in. 😎

        • Paul Matthews
          Posted November 28, 2018 at 1:44 pm | Permalink

          My id’s:

          1. Black-headed Grosbeak (Pheucticus melanocephalus)

          2. Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)

          3. American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis), with Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis), the “Oregon Junco” subspecies, formerly considered a full species

          4. Hairy Woodpecker (Leuconotopicus villosus)

          5. Western Tanager (Piranga ludoviciana)

          6. Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis)

          7. Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus)

          8. Purple Finch (Haemorhous purpureus). Another possibility is the very similar Cassin’s Finch (Haemorhous cassinii), a western species with which, as an Easterner, I’m not familiar. But the bird looks like a Purple Finch to me.

          9. Steller’s Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri)

          10. Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)

          • rickflick
            Posted November 28, 2018 at 2:00 pm | Permalink

            Thanks for the info on the Oregon junco. I was until recently also an Easterner. I became aware of the ‘Oregon’ designation but I didn’t know the history. Here in Idaho I see dark eyed juncos. In they East they were slate colored juncos.

            • Paul Matthews
              Posted November 28, 2018 at 2:10 pm | Permalink

              There used to be a lot more species of juncos (e.g., Slate-coloured, Oregon, White-winged) but a bunch of them got lumped into Dark-eyed Junco a while back. These days the trend is for splitting rather than lumping species, so I suppose it’s not impossible that some of these species could be revived. I haven’t heard any rumours to that effect, though. I believe the various forms of Dark-eyed Junco hybridize very freely where they come into contact, so I’m not holding my breath for any Dark-eyed Junco splitting.

    • Posted November 28, 2018 at 11:25 am | Permalink

      1st one is not bullock’s oriole but black-headed grosbeak i believe.
      Unknown red head is western tanager.

      i think the woodpecker may be hairy rather than downy based on bill shape.

      As a UK resident I am happy to be corrected if someone knows better!

    • Mark Sturtevant
      Posted November 28, 2018 at 12:26 pm | Permalink

      I was not sure about several so thank you. I was thinking the unknown redhead was a rosy finch.

      • Mark Sturtevant
        Posted November 28, 2018 at 12:27 pm | Permalink

        Sorry, different red head. I don’t know what that one was.

    • Posted November 28, 2018 at 1:39 pm | Permalink

      I think the “unknown red head” is a western tanager (male) – I saw one while in northern California a few years ago – stunning birds!

  5. Mark Sturtevant
    Posted November 28, 2018 at 12:26 pm | Permalink

    Very nice, and a great variety!


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