It’s time to watch the Mars landing!

It’s time to watch the InSight probe land–NOW!  A live video from NASA is below. Seven minutes until separation. and about 22 minutes till touchdown! Remember that it takes light (and radio signals) three minutes to get from Mars to Earth, so we won’t know whether the landing is successful until 182 seconds after it occurs (if it does).

. . . so far so good. It’s fricking amazing that our species can take the temperature of another planet.

. . . aaaand. . . TOUCHDOWN CONFIRMED! What a species we are!

55 Comments

  1. Posted November 26, 2018 at 1:45 pm | Permalink

    copy mission control WEIT
    Seated and watching.
    standing by, holding my breath!

  2. Jon Mummaw
    Posted November 26, 2018 at 1:50 pm | Permalink

    I believe it takes 14 minutes for the signal to get from Mars to Earth.

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted November 26, 2018 at 2:04 pm | Permalink

      It’s about 20 minutes so I can’t figure out how they got that image so quickly and also how they were able to confirm that deploys happened other than we were learning about it 20 minutes late & it had already happened.

      • rickflick
        Posted November 26, 2018 at 2:54 pm | Permalink

        It’s 9 minutes late. Which means if there was a snafu any time during the 7 minute landing phase, we wouldn’t know ’till well after the fail. The fact that everything has already happened doesn’t seem to effect the intense focus of the team as information comes in. It’s just like real-time.

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted November 26, 2018 at 2:57 pm | Permalink

          Yes, we are closer to Mars right now. The farthest point would take approximately 20 minutes.

          And no, I understand it seems immediate for us but think of how frustrating it is knowing that you can’t do a thing. You need to just come along for the ride as soon as the craft gets far from Earth.

        • Wunold
          Posted November 26, 2018 at 3:37 pm | Permalink

          Someone from NASA on the live stream (I think it was the administrator) said 8 minutes.

          • Wunold
            Posted November 26, 2018 at 3:39 pm | Permalink

            Ah, now I see that darwinwins already wrote that. :*)

      • Posted November 26, 2018 at 6:09 pm | Permalink

        Fist bump! 🙂

    • Posted November 26, 2018 at 2:15 pm | Permalink

      Mars is eight light minutes from Earth right now.

      • W.T. Effingham
        Posted November 26, 2018 at 6:15 pm | Permalink

        There’s no real time like the real present.

  3. Mark Sturtevant
    Posted November 26, 2018 at 1:52 pm | Permalink

    About to separate heat shield….(I am getting pretty anxious here).

  4. Posted November 26, 2018 at 1:54 pm | Permalink

    Breathing now!

  5. Mark Sturtevant
    Posted November 26, 2018 at 1:54 pm | Permalink

    Heat shield off, and after one potato two potato…
    Touchdown comfirmed!!

  6. John Conoboy
    Posted November 26, 2018 at 1:57 pm | Permalink

    Wow. That was amazing to watch.

  7. Posted November 26, 2018 at 2:01 pm | Permalink

    God must have guided it down. How else could that all happen?

    • Lee
      Posted November 26, 2018 at 2:26 pm | Permalink

      Actually, God created humans to be sub-creators. Like farming out a great work of literature to a team of freshmen writers.

      At least that was Tolkien’s view.

  8. Christopher
    Posted November 26, 2018 at 2:11 pm | Permalink

    Launches are far more visually satisfying but successful landings are emotionally so. Even having absolutely no ties to this program beyond casual interest, when I heard the confirmation I couldn’t help but pump my fist in the air and get a lump in my throat. Now to wait for the cool data stuff to roll in…

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted November 26, 2018 at 2:12 pm | Permalink

      If I were on that project team during the launch, I’d sneak into the corner so no one would hug me.

      • Christopher
        Posted November 26, 2018 at 2:33 pm | Permalink

        Im sure if I were on that project team the others would have avoided hugging me. I’d have dinner plate sized sweat stains under each arm.

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted November 26, 2018 at 2:35 pm | Permalink

          😀

      • rickflick
        Posted November 26, 2018 at 3:04 pm | Permalink

        That suggests special clothing for shy people. Maybe coyote whiskers:

        https://www.coyotevest.com/collections/coyotevest/products/coyotewhiskers

        • Wunold
          Posted November 26, 2018 at 3:47 pm | Permalink

          Great find! I will recommend it to my friend with Asperger Syndrome. 😀 (We share that kind of humor.)

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted November 26, 2018 at 4:23 pm | Permalink

          Haha. I’m not shy, I just don’t like people hugging or touching me. If you are pn the spectrum, I’m the perfect non spectrum pal for you as I won’t touch you.

  9. Tom Czarny
    Posted November 26, 2018 at 2:15 pm | Permalink

    Just for a moment I am so proud to be an American. I had forgotten what that was like.

    • Wunold
      Posted November 26, 2018 at 3:56 pm | Permalink

      Did you watch it up until they interviewed two European scientists and talked about the collaboration of many nations on this project?

      If anything, I’m amazed by our entire species right now. Despite our destructive tendencies, things like this give me hope for our kind.

      • veroxitatis
        Posted November 26, 2018 at 5:17 pm | Permalink

        On the other hand, I’m surprised Dump has not claimed sole credit (At least A++).

        • Wunold
          Posted November 27, 2018 at 12:49 am | Permalink

          Apropos, did he say/tweet anything about it, or was it too positive and “sciency” for any snide remarks?

          If I remember correctly, the NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine said that the vice president congratulated him on the phone right after the successful landing. He got a call from a number with all zeroes, so he knew it was someone important. 🙂

  10. Posted November 26, 2018 at 2:16 pm | Permalink

    When that image popped up, we cheered right along with them!

  11. Randall Schenck
    Posted November 26, 2018 at 2:19 pm | Permalink

    To stay on a positive note – maybe they can find some jobs for the laid off GM employees up there.

  12. mikeyc
    Posted November 26, 2018 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

    It’s good to see that the CubeSats worked well too. Two independent missions in one.

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted November 26, 2018 at 3:05 pm | Permalink

      Yeah I was just reading about the Cubesats. They are just small too – the size of a brief case. I guess used as a PoC.

      • Wunold
        Posted November 26, 2018 at 4:05 pm | Permalink

        They said on the stream that the Cubesats were an experiment themselves. NASA did send two of them in case one would break down, but both of them worked perfectly. \o/

        In the future, these devices could be developed to be much more than mere relays. They could be equipped with sensors and other scientific equipment. They are also relatively cheap, because a good share of their parts are standard components.

        • Mark Sturtevant
          Posted November 26, 2018 at 4:14 pm | Permalink

          That emoji reminds me of this one:

          ~~~\o/~~~~/|~~~~

          Which is supposed to show a shark in the water with a swimmer.

          • Wunold
            Posted November 27, 2018 at 12:42 am | Permalink

            Nice. 😀 I didn’t know that one.

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted November 26, 2018 at 4:29 pm | Permalink

          Yes, PoCs for future missions.

          • rickflick
            Posted November 26, 2018 at 5:44 pm | Permalink

            PoC? Possible options collection?

            • Diana MacPherson
              Posted November 26, 2018 at 5:50 pm | Permalink

              Proof of concept.

              • rickflick
                Posted November 27, 2018 at 7:14 pm | Permalink

                Ah!

  13. Steve Pollard
    Posted November 26, 2018 at 4:33 pm | Permalink

    Well played NASA.

    Just remind me: what precisely was the religious input into the planning and execution of this amazing mission?

    • Wunold
      Posted November 26, 2018 at 4:51 pm | Permalink

      Morality, of course. Without religion, NASA’s staff would just kill each other instead of poking holes into god’s firmament.

      (Sorry for the double post, WP just decided once more to detach my reply from the original comment.)

  14. Wunold
    Posted November 26, 2018 at 4:49 pm | Permalink

    Morality, of course. Without religion, NASA’s staff would just kill each other instead of poking holes into god’s firmament.

  15. Posted November 26, 2018 at 5:03 pm | Permalink

    Watched with g kids and grandma

  16. Diana MacPherson
    Posted November 26, 2018 at 6:53 pm | Permalink

    🤣 sometimes I have to reason out loud.

  17. Posted November 27, 2018 at 1:04 am | Permalink

    It’s now been confirmed that the solar panels have been deployed, which was another phase that is critical to the mission’s success.

    Congratulations to all at NASA and at Lockheed Martin Space for a remarkable accomplishment. And congratulations also to NASA for their intelligent and informative TV coverage, which explained the mission and its significance very clearly, whilst allowing us to share vicariously in the “seven minutes of terror” and the joy and elation afterwards.

    • Steve Pollard
      Posted November 27, 2018 at 1:17 pm | Permalink

      Fantastic, thank you for that; I was waiting for that good news.

    • rickflick
      Posted November 27, 2018 at 9:16 pm | Permalink

      +1

  18. Diane G
    Posted November 27, 2018 at 5:06 am | Permalink

    I hope lots of schools were following this wonderful, exhilarating adventure in classrooms or special assemblys!

    • Deodand
      Posted November 27, 2018 at 6:07 am | Permalink

      I doubt it, most schools these days teach that ‘White Mans Science’ is inherently racist and sexist and should be ignored for soon it will be replaced with ‘other ways of knowing’.


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