Readers’ wildlife photos

After today there will be a hiatus in wildlife photos till mid-November, as I’ll be in Paris. But if you sent me photos already, do not worry: they’ll all be up eventually.

Jacques Hausser from Switzerland, who recently sent us photos of puffins, has switched kingdoms to send us flowers. His notes and IDs are indented:

Some years ago, I tried to sample every spontaneous flowering plant in my garden. Today, I present some of the tiniest (max 1 cm), less conspicuous and most modest ones. They are mostly regarded as weeds, but a close view can reveal their hidden charms.

Galinsoga quadriradiata (Asteraceae):

Myosotis arvensis (Boraginaceae):

Gallium aparine (Rubiaceae):

Veronica heredifolia (Scrofulariaceae):

Polygonum aviculare (Polygonaceae):

Oxalis corniculata (Oxalidaceae):

Veronica serpyllifolia (Scrofularaceae):

Cerastium glomeratum (Caryophyllaceae):

Geum urbanum (Rosaceae):

Geranium dissectum (Gereniaceae):

10 Comments

  1. W.Benson
    Posted November 1, 2018 at 8:05 am | Permalink

    Scrophulariaceae? Geranaceae?

    • W.Benson
      Posted November 1, 2018 at 8:06 am | Permalink

      Oops! Geraniaceae

      • jacques Hausser
        Posted November 1, 2018 at 8:34 am | Permalink

        Oops! indeed… Sorry for the spellings. To be a zoologist is not an excuse, I’m afraid.

  2. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted November 1, 2018 at 8:15 am | Permalink

    Polygonaceae is a beautiful name

  3. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted November 1, 2018 at 8:18 am | Permalink

    Also

    A quick look at the names suggest an origin for chemicals such as oxalic acid, caryophyllene, …

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caryophyllene

  4. Posted November 1, 2018 at 11:55 am | Permalink

    Very nice! And I am glad to see that some weeds are considered part of a garden. I have some of those in our garden as well.

  5. rickflick
    Posted November 1, 2018 at 12:47 pm | Permalink

    I often note the tiny flowers and wonder about them. If humans were only 10 cm tall, we would cultivate these. 😎

  6. Diane G
    Posted November 1, 2018 at 6:47 pm | Permalink

    Just lovely! I always note the minute flowerers and mean to look them up but never get around to it. Beautiful photos! And many thanks for including the family names.

  7. Mark R.
    Posted November 1, 2018 at 7:45 pm | Permalink

    Thanks for submitting these Jacques…I always enjoy your impressive macro-photos.

  8. Posted November 12, 2018 at 2:46 pm | Permalink

    Charming flowers!


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