Jesus ‘n’ Mo ‘n’ reiki

The new Jesus and Mo strip, called “hands,” came with a note: “I don’t know what makes the boys feel entitled to make fun of Reiki, but they do.”

If you don’t know what the pseudoscience of reiki is, read here.

Those who believe in reiki, of course, like those who believe in homeopathy, do so on faith. They should get no more approbation for being “people of faith” than to those who adhere to Islam, Christianity, or any other religion.

10 Comments

  1. W.T. Effingham
    Posted October 3, 2018 at 10:25 am | Permalink

    A fifth panel to this J&M might have jeebus explain, “They were quick to direct me to the numerous ATMs and cashier booths throughout the fairgrounds.”

  2. Posted October 3, 2018 at 10:59 am | Permalink

    “Those who believe in reiki, of course, like those who believe in homeopathy, do so on faith. They should get no more approbation for being “people of faith” than to those who adhere to Islam, Christianity, or any other religion.”

    And no less approbation!

  3. neil
    Posted October 3, 2018 at 11:11 am | Permalink

    Ouch! Fantastic…irony?

  4. rickflick
    Posted October 3, 2018 at 2:07 pm | Permalink

    😎

  5. Posted October 3, 2018 at 2:10 pm | Permalink

    Even more problematic is acupuncture, because so many people just blindly believe it. I have learned to just not try to argue about it.

    • Sastra
      Posted October 3, 2018 at 2:38 pm | Permalink

      Acupuncture at least involves physical contact and, if you ignore the crap about meridians and energy, could conceivably have some sort of biological mechanism. Well-designed studies, however, reveal it’s just an elaborate placebo.

      Both reiki and acupuncture have their origins and explanations in a supernatural view of reality. If someone buys into the entire package, it’s a religion.

      • Posted October 3, 2018 at 4:48 pm | Permalink

        The physical contact probably enhances the placebo effect considerably. It is well known that the brain responds to taking action, regardless of its physical effect. Bloodletting probably worked some of the time.

    • Sastra
      Posted October 3, 2018 at 2:43 pm | Permalink

      Oh, I do argue about it — or try to. If they don’t hear it from friends, they’re never going to be exposed to the other side.

      I never expect them to change their minds in front of me. My goal is to create enough internal doubt and defensiveness that, when faced with an extreme (“acupuncture cures cancer!”) they’ll reign themselves back.

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted October 3, 2018 at 6:46 pm | Permalink

      I have a Pavlovian phobia about sharp pointy things. Somebody approaches me with a handful of needles, it’ll have a psychologically-mediated physiological effect all right. “You’re not sticking that @#$%ing thing in me!”

      You could call it an ‘anti-placebo’ effect…

      cr

  6. Steve Pollard
    Posted October 3, 2018 at 3:21 pm | Permalink

    I too have had friends and, even, relatives (oh! the shame!) extolling quackery, especially acupuncture. Just the placebo effect, I say; all in the mind.

    And then stuff like this today (paywall; no doubt others know how to get through it): https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/dr-michael-mosley-can-a-placeboreally-cure-a-bad-back-gj7mh8c9t


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