Tuesday: Hili dialogue

It’s Tuesday, October 2, 2018, and the weather in Chicago is going to warm up considerably in the next two days, perhaps keeping my ducks around a bit longer. It’s National World Farm Animals Day; but why not just “World Farm Animals Day”, which should really be about making sure their living (and dying) conditions are comfortable and humane? It’s also National Grandparents Day, but only in Italy.

Here’s Tuesday on the Cheezburger site’s new calendar: “A typical week through the eyes of a [Pallas] cat“.  The cat is clearly distressed, as today is the Cruelest Day.

On October 2, 1187, Saladan, the Sultan of Egypt and Syria, captured Jerusalem after it had been ruled by the Crusaders for 88 years.  On this day in 1789, the U.S. Bill of Rights was sent to the states for ratification.  On October 2, 1919, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson suffered a massive stroke that left him paralyzed on one side and partially blind. This of course took him out of action for a long time, but was kept hidden from the public. This would no longer be possible after the 25th Amendment to the Constitution mandated removal of an incapacitated President. On this day in 1928, according to Wikipedia, “The ‘Prelature of the Holy Cross and the Work of God’, commonly known as Opus Dei, [was] founded.” You’ll know about that if you read the dreadful novel The Da Vinci Code.  On this day in 1967, Thurgood Marshall was sworn in as the U.S. Supreme Court’s first black justice. And another event from Wikipedia: it was on this day in 2000 that “the Rijndael algorithm [was] chosen by NIST as the AES standard.” Someone can explain it below. Finally, on this day in 2002, the Beltway sniper attacks began. Ten people were killed over the ensuing three weeks before the two perpetrators were brought to justice.

Notables born on this day include Nat Turner (1800), Paul von Hindenberg (1847), Mahatma Gandhi (1869), Wallace Stevens (1879), Groucho Marx (1890), Bud Abbott (1897), Graham Greene (1904), Christian de Duve (1917; Nobel Laureate), Johnnie Cochran (1937), Don McLean (1945), Donna Karan (1948), Annie Leibovitz (1949), Sting (1951), and Maribel Verdú (1970). Here’s a Leibovitz photo of Grace Coddington taken for British Vogue:

Those who died on October 2 include Samuel Adams (he really liked beer!), Svante Arrhenius (1927; Nobel Laureate), Marcel Duchamp (1968), Paavo Nurmi (1973), Rock Hudson (1985), Gene Autry (1998), August Wilson (2005), and Tom Petty (last year).

Here’s Tom Petty performing my favorite of his songs; this took place during his 2002 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (I must make it there some day). As Rolling Stone pointed out, the jangly guitars, vocals, and driving beat conjure up the great songs of The Byrds. This was the last song performed by Petty and the Heartbreakers live: at the Hollywood Bowl, just two weeks before he died of a drug overdose.

Meanwhile in Dobrzyn, Hili is hungry now (this is always the case):

Hili: Don’t you think that your breakfast can wait?
Andrzej: I suspect it will have to.
In Polish:
Hili: Czy nie sądzisz, że twoje śniadanie może poczekać?
Ja: Podejrzewam, że będzie musiało.

From reader Blue, a tweet showing a really cool idea:

Also from Blue: “I cannot tell a lie; I really like beer!”

From reader Paul, who sent the cutest duck ever:

From reader Barry; a spider gets disturbed:

Some tweets from Matthew. First, a wandering anteater panhandles (or panpawdles):

Wallabies in love:

“Seem ineffective”? Maybe, but a slight selective advantage is all it takes. Or maybe the bizarre ornaments are involved in species recognition:

A really cool optical illusion:

Two from Heather Hastie. As she says of the first picture, “The entire court in South Fulton, GA, is run by black women.”

This cat really likes getting its forehead brushed:

 

31 Comments

  1. Serendipitydawg
    Posted October 2, 2018 at 6:40 am | Permalink

    that if you read the dreadful novel

    I dispute this description: dreadful, yes definitely, novel … no, that is just wrong in so many ways.

    As my friend described it: “Waste of a perfectly good tree”.

  2. Randall Schenck
    Posted October 2, 2018 at 6:51 am | Permalink

    Not only does Kavanaugh like beer, he loves to lie. Latest one is telling the committee he did not know about Ramirez until it was reported in the New Yorker. However, prior to that he ask Karen Yarasavage to speak in his defense on the matter. I guess the FBI investigation is being done by the media.

  3. infiniteimprobabilit
    Posted October 2, 2018 at 6:51 am | Permalink

    “This of course took him out of action for a long time, but was kept hidden from the public. This would no longer be possible after the 25th Amendment to the Constitution mandated removal of an incapacitated President.”

    I’d amend that to “This would no longer be possible since the advent of television”.

    cr

    • Randall Schenck
      Posted October 2, 2018 at 6:54 am | Permalink

      Don’t we have an incapacitated one now?

      • Serendipitydawg
        Posted October 2, 2018 at 7:00 am | Permalink

        I don’t think that kind of incapacity counts, sadly.

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted October 2, 2018 at 7:02 am | Permalink

        Sadly, no. Apparently.

        (Yeah I know exactly what you mean)

        cr

  4. Ken Kukec
    Posted October 2, 2018 at 6:59 am | Permalink

    You’ll know about that if you read the dreadful novel The Da Vinci Code.

    Renowned evolutionary biologist Jerry Coyne staggered through Dan Brown’s dreadful novel?.

    • Posted October 2, 2018 at 7:03 am | Permalink

      Not by choice. I spent a week’s vacation at a rented cottage in Dorset, England, and that was the ONLY book in the house (I’d forgotten to bring a book). I was more or less constrained to read it.

      • Serendipitydawg
        Posted October 2, 2018 at 7:19 am | Permalink

        There must have been another house nearby, even in Dorset. I am sure they would have taken pity and loaned you something else. Also, there is always a Yellow Pages or even a BT phone book (admittedly, a little predictable but the exposition is way better than TDC and the twist ending makes it worth the read).

      • Ken Kukec
        Posted October 2, 2018 at 8:11 am | Permalink

        Yeah, I read it under similar constraints myself — as, apparently, did Geoffrey Pullum, according to the Language Log piece I linked to above. Indeed, that site has an entire sub-genre dissecting just how godawful Dan Brown’s prose can be.

        I’ll give the devilish Dan Brown his due in one regard though: as painfully obvious as is his technique, he understands how to force the reader to make the jump to the next rotten chapter.

      • JonLynnHarvey
        Posted October 2, 2018 at 2:40 pm | Permalink

        It’s the most extreme case of a movie being better than the book I have ever encountered in my entire life.

        Not exactly a silk purse out of a sow’s ear, but at least a very decently serviceable wallet!!

        Tom Hanks is the perfect choice to play Robert Langdon, and Ron Howard is the right director for this sort of story. Audrey Tautou and Ian McKellan are also very well-chosen for their parts.

        Other notable movies better than the book include “The Bridges of Madison County” and “Psycho”, but I think the ratio of film quality to book quality is arguably the highest in DaVinci Code.

        • Ken Kukec
          Posted October 3, 2018 at 6:24 am | Permalink

          Wasn’t my favorite performance by Tom Hanks, but, I gotta admit, like the werewolf Warren Zevon saw drinking a pina colada at Trader Vic’s, his hair was perfect. 🙂

      • Posted October 3, 2018 at 11:46 am | Permalink

        I hate that dilemma – bad book or not read …

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted October 2, 2018 at 8:08 am | Permalink

      I haven’t read it. I have read Justice Peter Smith’s judgement in the unsuccessful lawsuit that Baigent and Leigh (authors of The Holy Blood and The Holy Grail) brought against Brown’s publishers. It was probably more fun.

      “It would be quite wrong if fictional writers were to have their writings pored over in the way ‘The Da Vinci Code’ has been pored over in this case by authors of pretend historical books to make an allegation of infringement of copyright.”

      *pretend* historical books – ouch!

      cr

    • ChrisS
      Posted October 2, 2018 at 10:55 am | Permalink

      I didn’t even feel I needed to read the damn thing to have an opinion.

      It was bad enough just listening to people talk about it.

      • Christopher
        Posted October 2, 2018 at 11:30 am | Permalink

        Same here. I didn’t read it, or Fifty Shades of Gonorrhea. I did read Harry Potter as it was assigned in a college English course and I admit I thoroughly enjoyed reading it and the rest of the series to my then 6-year old son. Call me a snob but I have an innate avoidance response to anything that is so highly praised by the masses and if I do read something “everybody” is talking about, I usually realize that my gut instinct was correct. I cannot help but to wonder, however, what my response to Twain, Steinbeck, or Hemingway might have been had I been of an earlier age. Oh, who the hell am I kidding, no matter how many decades go by, Brown will NEVER be this generation’s Hemingway!

  5. infiniteimprobabilit
    Posted October 2, 2018 at 7:00 am | Permalink

    That optical illusion is just a variant on the rotating circles seen yesterday, though much less striking, I think, and easier to explain.

    The eye takes its cues from the highlighting on the image being looked at; the overall black shape of the three silhouettes changes in exactly the same way, therefore the brain assumes the other two figures are doin’ what the principal one is doin’.

    cr

  6. Hempenstein
    Posted October 2, 2018 at 7:13 am | Permalink

    Long ago while in exile in Jersey I had a physics grad student neigbor who had a big B/W cat named Dirac. Dirac liked his head scratched and I tried to keep my hands off on accounta allergies, so I tried scratching his head with a key. He liked that. It got to the point that I’d just take out the key and hold it pointed downward. Dirac would run up and but his head into it.

    • Posted October 3, 2018 at 11:48 am | Permalink

      Sounds like that the cat was more personable than the physicist. (Dirac, that is, not your neighbour.)

  7. Posted October 2, 2018 at 7:56 am | Permalink

    You’ll know about that if you read the dreadful novel The Da Vinci Code.

    Yes, it’s dreadful, but, on the other hand, I read it through in more or less one sitting. I can point to lots of things wrong with it, but that would be literary hypocrisy on my part – I found it very entertaining.

    I would dispute your assertion that you would know all about Opus Dei if you have read the novel. I don’t know anything about Opus Dei (unless they really do employ albino assassins) but if his characterisation of them is as accurate as his depiction of London and Paris and police procedure in both, then it is almost wholly fictional.

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted October 2, 2018 at 8:30 am | Permalink

      I came upon a website devoted to picking apart all the things that were just plain wrong in DVC. Such as geographical inaccuracies (which suggested that Brown’s claimed exhaustive research was BS). Written by some nerd. (Just like me.)

      (It was not one of the anti-DVC sites inspired by the Catholic Church, who seem to have objections to DVC for some reason of their own about which I couldn’t give a toss).

      cr

      • Posted October 2, 2018 at 9:59 am | Permalink

        The only inaccuracy that really annoyed me was the idea that a Parisian police officer could or would travel to London and organise a man hunt. He’d just issue a European Arrest Warrant and let the British police deal with it.

      • Posted October 2, 2018 at 11:17 pm | Permalink

        I came upon a website devoted to picking apart all the things that were just plain wrong in DVC.

        I found two of his other books entertaining (Angels and Demons, Inferno) but the inaccuracies were really something to behold. Haven’t read any other books of his, though a friend likes all of them.

        -Ryan

    • Posted October 27, 2018 at 12:58 pm | Permalink

      For all its defects, it has plot and suspense.

  8. Larry Smith
    Posted October 2, 2018 at 9:50 am | Permalink

    Already a year since Tom Petty died… “American Girl” is my favorite song of his as well, one I never get tired of listening to. I liked how Petty slightly changed his interpretation of his vocals to shade the meaning a bit. And this to a song he/they must have performed a thousand times…

  9. rickflick
    Posted October 2, 2018 at 10:59 am | Permalink

    Imagine what a reputation you’d get if caught holding a whole plate of those cookies.

    • Mark R.
      Posted October 2, 2018 at 1:16 pm | Permalink

      It reminded me of my older brother when we were both very young; he who would spit in his ice cream so I wouldn’t steal it. Gross, I know.

  10. Laura
    Posted October 2, 2018 at 6:10 pm | Permalink

    Where has Gus been? I miss our Canadian earless felid.

  11. Posted October 27, 2018 at 12:59 pm | Permalink

    The white duck is indeed extremely cute!


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