The bird is in good hands

I am clearly not a birder: the debilitated “sparrow” I found this morning was not a sparrow, or at least that’s what I was told when the nice woman from Chicago Bird Collision Monitors came by my lab to pick it up. (She said they’d “had a busy day”, and also told me that she’s had tons of experience rehabbing birds.) It has yellow under its wings, and perhaps a reader can ID it from the photo below. It looks as if was perking up a bit, and it’s now on its way to the Willowbrook Wildlife Center for care. I hope they let me know how it fares.

Good luck, birdie! Thanks to Michael Fisher for giving me the CBCM phone number.

So, what is this?

 

34 Comments

  1. Paul Techsupport
    Posted September 29, 2018 at 11:30 am | Permalink

    Female Rose Breasted Grosbeak

  2. Posted September 29, 2018 at 11:31 am | Permalink

    Is it a young Cooper’s Hawk? Just a wild guess, since there is a small family of Cooper’s Hawks on the quadrangles … with a nest near Harper Library, just to its north.

    – Sid s220@uchicago.edu

  3. Aki Muthali
    Posted September 29, 2018 at 11:37 am | Permalink

    Looks like a house finch. I could be wrong.

  4. Posted September 29, 2018 at 11:52 am | Permalink

    Just an observation, but to identify it, the picture should get a side shot of its head and body and something for scale. It looks like a young Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

    • Posted September 29, 2018 at 12:33 pm | Permalink

      I didn’t want to disturb it too much; otherwise I would have taken a better picture.

      I hope it lives.

  5. dabertini
    Posted September 29, 2018 at 1:11 pm | Permalink

    Great news. Angry Catman’s work is never done.

  6. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted September 29, 2018 at 1:14 pm | Permalink

    Interesting results!

  7. Michael Fisher
    Posted September 29, 2018 at 1:28 pm | Permalink

    The feathered one is resting on your graduation gown – so I dub it the Mortar Bird

    • rickflick
      Posted September 29, 2018 at 1:55 pm | Permalink

      I always thought the mortar bird was what left duck prints in the wet cement.

      • Linda Calhoun
        Posted September 29, 2018 at 2:37 pm | Permalink

        GROOAAAANNNNN.

        • Diane G
          Posted September 30, 2018 at 2:01 am | Permalink

          Hey, Michael deserved a good groan, too!

          • Michael Fisher
            Posted September 30, 2018 at 2:06 am | Permalink

            Rick has the cute black dog avatar while I’m stuck with my face [tinted blue – not natural]. It’s favouritism I tell yah.

            • Diane G
              Posted September 30, 2018 at 2:43 am | Permalink

              OK, I will hereby make up for your groan deficit…

              GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRROOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAANNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN!

              There, that help?

              PS: Is there a story behind the blue face?

              • Michael Fisher
                Posted September 30, 2018 at 9:56 am | Permalink

                Just a favourite colour

              • rickflick
                Posted September 30, 2018 at 11:03 am | Permalink

                I thought, maybe, from your last name.
                🐟

              • Michael Fisher
                Posted September 30, 2018 at 11:13 am | Permalink

                eh?

      • Michael Fisher
        Posted September 29, 2018 at 2:40 pm | Permalink

        I guess that’s academic now

  8. SnowyOwl
    Posted September 29, 2018 at 2:57 pm | Permalink

    It’s a White-throated Sparrow… very common migrant right now.
    Grosbeaks are long gone from the NE now!

    • rickflick
      Posted September 29, 2018 at 3:55 pm | Permalink

      But, look at it’s gross beak! Not sparrow like at all. If Grosbeaks have flown the coop, this one is a straggler.

    • Paul Techsupport
      Posted September 29, 2018 at 6:15 pm | Permalink

      eBird bar charts for Cook County show the Rose-breasted Grosbeak peaking in mid-September and disappearing in mid-November.

      eBird.org -> Explore -> Explore Regions ->
      Cook, Illinois -> click “Bar Charts” -> CTRL + F enter Rose-breasted Grosbeak

      climate change influence over your past experience?

  9. Chukar
    Posted September 29, 2018 at 3:06 pm | Permalink

    Rose-breasted Grosbeak, most likely a female, possibly a first year male. Black-headed Grosbeak wouldn’t have all the streaks on the breast (with other differences in plumage) and their normal range at Chicago’s latitude is west of central Nebraska, whereas the Rose-breasted’s range runs from Nova Scotia to eastern Nebraska.

    They like to eat fruit and invertebrates. The males are lovely, especially in the spring, and have a nice song.

  10. ladyatheist
    Posted September 29, 2018 at 6:06 pm | Permalink

    I agree with the grossbeak conclusion:

  11. John Longhenry
    Posted September 30, 2018 at 6:40 pm | Permalink

    Female Rose-breasted Grosbeak

    • Posted October 1, 2018 at 6:14 am | Permalink

      Adult or juvenile?

      Can I suggest we all use the Latin name? Pheucticus ludovicianus
      To be bird-nerdy! 🙂

      Perhaps someone should take it to Cuba!

  12. Posted October 2, 2018 at 5:21 am | Permalink

    A birder friend says if it’s the size of a Robin, it”‘s probably a female or juvenile Rose-breasted Grosbeak. If it’s the size of a sparrow, then it’s likely a female Purple Finch.
    Friend remarks it,s hard to tell from angle of shot and nothing against which to reference the bird’s size.


%d bloggers like this: