Readers’ wildlife photos

Reader Rik Gern sent a number of photos of opening sunflowers, and they’re lovely. I have too many to post here, but will spread them out over the next few weeks. Here are his notes:

 Here are some pictures for consideration in your Readers Wildlife Pictures collection.

This is more like mildlife than wildlife; these are common sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) that pop up in my back yard every year. I decided to do a series of “portraits” of the flower heads as they transitioned from tight buds to flowers to dried out husks.  I love the fact that something as common as a weed can provide so much beauty, and all for free; all you have to spend is a little time to observe and appreciate.

The pictures were taken with a Canon SD PowerShot 400 and processed in Photoshop CS6.

16 Comments

  1. Posted August 24, 2018 at 7:34 am | Permalink

    Beautiful.

  2. DrBrydon
    Posted August 24, 2018 at 7:47 am | Permalink

    Sunflowers are my favorite. Thanks.

  3. Posted August 24, 2018 at 8:19 am | Permalink

    Reblogged this on The Logical Place.

  4. Mark Sturtevant
    Posted August 24, 2018 at 8:27 am | Permalink

    Rik, these are absolutely beautiful. One thing that I covet is soft, out-of-focus backgrounds & good bokeh, and you have plenty of that here. No doubt carefully produced on purpose. Well done!

    • Posted August 24, 2018 at 9:04 am | Permalink

      Thank you Mark. I had to look up bokeh, but yeah, it was on purpose. One of the great things about Photoshop is that you can choose specific areas to hyperfocus and you can accentuate the blur in other areas. It’s way more fun than video games!

  5. Christopher
    Posted August 24, 2018 at 10:21 am | Permalink

    To rework an old saying: “a weed is merely a plant nobody bothers to pay attention to”. So common yet so beautiful. My attention was split while reading/viewing this post as a small flock of cardinals was busy feasting from the downturned, seed-heavy, sunflowers outside my bedroom windows. I’m not lucky enough to have them grow wild so I scatter handfuls of Russian mammoth seeds as well as the garden variety sunflower seeds that go into my winter feeders. Such a cheery, joyful plant. Thank you for sharing.

    • rickflick
      Posted August 24, 2018 at 10:12 pm | Permalink

      “I scatter handfuls of Russian mammoth seeds as well as the garden variety sunflower seeds that go into my winter feeders.”

      What a great idea. Thanks.

  6. Cate Plys
    Posted August 24, 2018 at 10:28 am | Permalink

    Wonderful, thanks!

  7. yazikus
    Posted August 24, 2018 at 10:51 am | Permalink

    Wonderful shots- flowers are amazing.

  8. Posted August 24, 2018 at 11:04 am | Permalink

    Beautiful! Reminds me of how fascinated I was by the sunflowers in our backyard as a child.

    • Glenda Palmer
      Posted August 24, 2018 at 1:14 pm | Permalink

      +1

  9. SusanD
    Posted August 24, 2018 at 4:59 pm | Permalink

    Great shots. These plants remind me of triffids!

  10. Mark R.
    Posted August 24, 2018 at 7:41 pm | Permalink

    You could probably make a really cool animation if you have a lot of these in sequence. Great photos and a nice study.

  11. Posted August 24, 2018 at 8:19 pm | Permalink

    A lovely project and subject.

  12. rickflick
    Posted August 24, 2018 at 10:11 pm | Permalink

    You’ve done great with the light!

  13. Diane G
    Posted August 25, 2018 at 2:46 am | Permalink

    How striking! I keep scrolling back and forth through this series and eagerly await further installments. Beautiful!


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