Monday: Hili dialogue (and Leon monologue)

Rise and greet the new day: Monday, August 13, 2018: National Filet Mignon Day. I have to say that I never eat that cut of beef, because while it’s tender, it’s also relatively flavorless. Give me a rib-eye steak or a hanger steak any day! It’s also International Lefthanders Day, so lefties are welcome to flaunt their sinistrality in the comments.

I have a big radio interview this morning; details later. Posting may be light today.

On this day in 1521, Spanish consquistador Hernán Cortés and his forces captured the Aztec ruler Tlatoani Cuauhtémoc and thereby captured the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan near present-day Mexico City. It was a long and bloody siege, and is well worth reading about for many reasons.  Cortés had the king executed, and here’s a reconstruction of the scene: “The Martyrdom of Cuauhtémoc”, a 19th-century painting by Leandro Izaguirre:

On August 13, 1889, William Gray of Hartford, Connecticut, got a patent for the first pay phone, called “coin-controlled apparatus for telephones.” I am not sure that coin-operated phones even exist in the U.S. any longer.  On this day in 1918, women first enlisted in the Marine Corps, with Opha May Johnson being the first woman to enlist. She was a member of the Marine Corps Reserve and of course was assigned to a desk job.  On August 13, 1961, East Germany closed the border between East and West Berlin and began building the Berlin Wall. When I was a child I went through it at Checkpoint Charlie with my father, who had to wear his U.S. Army Uniform. We spent much of the day in East Berlin, and I found it scary!  Finally, on this day in 1964, two men, Peter Allen and Gwynne Evans, became the last people executed in the UK, having been found guilty of the murder of John Alan West.

Notables born on this day include Annie Oakley (1860), Bert Lahr (1895), Alfred Hitchcock (1899), Salvador Luria (1912, Nobel-winning molecular geneticist), George Shearing (1919), Fidel Castro (1926), Don Ho (1930), Kathleen Battle (1948) and Sarah Huckabee “I’m paid to lie” Sanders (1982). Those who died on August 13 include Eugène Delacrois (1863), Ignaz Semmelweis (1865), Florence Nightingale (1910), H. G. Wells (1946), Mickey Mantle (1995), Julia Child (2004), Les Paul (2009), Edwin Newman (2010), and Helen Gurley Brown (2012).  Here’s a nice painting by Delacroix, “A young tiger playing with its mother” (in French: “Jeune tigre jouant avec sa mère), first exhibited in 1831. Clearly, at least some artists had learned to paint cats by the beginning of the 19th century. But which one is the mother, and which the cub?

Meanwhile in Dobrzyn, Hili and Cyrus face a “choice,” though their path was already determined by the laws of physics:

Cyrus: We are at the crossroads.
Hili: Tell him to flip a coin.
In Polish:
Cyrus: Jesteśmy na rozdrożu.
Hili: Powiedz mu, żeby rzucił monetą.

Near Dobrzyn, Leon is off on another hike, but worries about the provisions.

Leon: Are you sure you packed up my treats?

A tweet from reader Barry:

A tweet from Matthew, showing one of his favorite topics—optical illusions:

Tweets from Heather Hastie (the first via Ann German). I don’t know if the first one is real, but it looks real.

Owl selfie! (Turn on video and sound):

Heather says, “How can they do this without laughing?” But it’s the changing of the guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia, a very solemn ceremony. Any spectator laughing would be admonished by the soldiers (I’ve seen that happen).

Tweets from Grania: kitty has trouble waiting for her turn:

One I found: backlash from the women-in-STEM movement as recounted by The Onion:

Grania and Orli both sent me what is apparently a real Facebook exchange, also highlighted on the parody Twitter account “The Mossad.” Jews control everything!
As lagniappe, click on this screenshot to go to an awesome video of mom and cub snow leopard in action (h/t: John):

 

79 Comments

  1. Nick
    Posted August 13, 2018 at 6:47 am | Permalink

    Regarding the capture of Tenochtitlan, I highly recommend Daniele Bolelli’s series on the Spanish conquest of the Mexica (Aztecs) in his History on Fire podcast.

    • GBJames
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 7:18 am | Permalink

      Thanks for the suggestion. I’ll give it a listen.

      One of the great adventure stories of all time is The Conquest of New Spain by Bernal Díaz del Castillo. Told, of course, through the eyes of the conquistadors.

      • Luis Servin
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 10:32 am | Permalink

        For balance, a good read is “The Broken Spears: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico” by renowned mexican historian Miguel León Portilla. I hate the title in english, as the literal translation of the title in spanish would be “Vision of the vanquished”.

      • Mike Cracraft
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 10:34 am | Permalink

        Also recommended:

        “Conquest” by Hugh Thomas and
        “The Life and Times of Mexico” by Earl Shorris

    • Nicolaas Stempels
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 4:25 pm | Permalink

      Is Mr Cortez actually burning Mr Cuauhtemoc’s feet? The latter looks really unconcerned, such a weird and unnerving image.

      • Diane G
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 11:18 pm | Permalink

        Interesting to view but not something I’d want on my wall!

      • Posted October 7, 2018 at 4:18 pm | Permalink

        The artist has actually depicted not the execution but the preceding torture when the feet of Cuauhtemoc and another Aztec nobleman (right of him) were burned to make them reveal hidden treasures. Cuauhtemoc endured it bravely.

  2. Randall Schenck
    Posted August 13, 2018 at 6:48 am | Permalink

    Oh no – more on the subject of meat. Here comes the grass fed folks.

    Cyrus and Hili remind us of Yogi’s famous words — If you come to a fork in the road, take it.

    I have personally viewed that Arlington spectacle as well. Military theater is all I can say.

    • Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:15 am | Permalink

      Meat is definitely tastier than grass.

      • GBJames
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:18 am | Permalink

        Not if you are a horse.

        • Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:21 am | Permalink

          I’m not a horse.

          • Randall Schenck
            Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:40 am | Permalink

            I hope we are not eating horses now.

            • Posted August 13, 2018 at 10:27 am | Permalink

              I’ve eaten horse and not just as a result of buying lasagne from Tesco’s. I’m not sure why people have hang ups about it. We routinely eat other large herbivores.

              • Mark R.
                Posted August 13, 2018 at 12:28 pm | Permalink

                Italy is the largest consumer of horse-meat in Europe. My father ate it a couple years back, he said it was delicious. Apparently, many want to ban the sale and are working to do so.

                I think the taboo of not eating the meat stems from the fact that many cultures (esp. American culture) sees horses as either pets or useful tools not to be consumed.

          • GBJames
            Posted August 13, 2018 at 10:34 am | Permalink

            As Anthelme Brillat-Savarin famously said, “You are what you eat.”

            • Nicolaas Stempels
              Posted August 13, 2018 at 4:30 pm | Permalink

              Are you insunuating we should eat cats? You are on thin ice here, especially here on this site.
              Btw, I note that the Chinese, notorious cat-eaters, score well on all kinds of intelligence and maths tests.😸

          • enl
            Posted August 13, 2018 at 3:17 pm | Permalink

            There’s should be a Captcha for that….

    • grasshopper
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 5:59 pm | Permalink

      Meat or grass? I compromise, by eating only animals that eat grass.

  3. Ken Kukec
    Posted August 13, 2018 at 7:01 am | Permalink

    … so lefties are welcome to flaunt their sinistrality in the comments.

    Their gaucheness, too?

    • joanfaiola
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 7:19 am | Permalink

      Loudly and proudly left handed. I am probably gauche too.

      • Ken Kukec
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 8:08 am | Permalink

        Very adroit answer, Joan. 🙂

        • freiner
          Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:27 am | Permalink

          So was that a left-handed compliment or not?

        • Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:50 am | Permalink

          A dexterous punster, you are.

          • Ken Kukec
            Posted August 13, 2018 at 11:21 am | Permalink

            Ambi-, in this instance.

    • Mark R.
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 12:34 pm | Permalink

      We lefties deserve to be a little gauche…after all, it’s a dextral world we live in…that’s why we die 9 years earlier.

      • Nicolaas Stempels
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 4:33 pm | Permalink

        But basically all our aminoacids are lefthanded, talk about a dextrous world.
        And sugar is bad for you!

        • Mark R.
          Posted August 13, 2018 at 8:04 pm | Permalink

          Didn’t know our proteins are lefties. Time to revolt!!! 🙂

  4. Linda Calhoun
    Posted August 13, 2018 at 7:37 am | Permalink

    Re: the kitten who couldn’t wait her turn.
    Have they considered getting a second bottle? It’s not that hard to feed two at once.

    L

    • Sarah
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 8:04 am | Permalink

      They look surprisingly big to be still being fed with a bottle.

      • Linda Calhoun
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 10:48 am | Permalink

        My business partners rescued a kitten two months ago. He was at least ten days old because his eyes were open, but I’m sure he wasn’t much older than that.

        It took more than a week to transition him from a bottle to a dish.

        And, babies need to suck, even if they can drink from a dish.

        L

        • Linda Calhoun
          Posted August 13, 2018 at 10:49 am | Permalink

          Also, they didn’t even try the dish until he was five weeks old, and then he mostly walked in it.

  5. Rita
    Posted August 13, 2018 at 7:55 am | Permalink

    I’m considered left-handed because that is my writing hand. But, I’m mostly ambidextrous. I have a few things where I prefer to use one hand or the other (must use scissors with right hand only), but for 80-90% of tasks, either hand is fine. I wonder about my brain structure.

    • Randall Schenck
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 7:59 am | Permalink

      I think maybe I am amphibious. Just kidding.

      Mostly right handed but I do a few things the other way, such as dealing cards (left handed). Not sure why that is?

    • Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:18 am | Permalink

      I do all one handed tasks left handed and two handed tasks right handed. For example, in cricket, I bowl left handed but I bat right handed.

      There are two exceptions: I play the guitar left handed and I use scissors right handed but the latter is because almost all scissors only work right handed.

      I also recently found out that kitchen knives are designed for right handers.

      • Terry Sheldon
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 1:03 pm | Permalink

        I am the same way, but until I saw your comment I never connected the one handed/two handed part. I just considered myself odd because I do certain things left handed (throw, swing a racket) and certain things right handed (bat, swing a golf club). My exception is that I write right handed, albeit with a very screwy grip. It has been described as writing left handed with my right hand, which, being a child of the 60s, may be totally accurate. I was probably (though I have no recollection of specific instances) forced to write with my right hand.

      • Sarah
        Posted August 14, 2018 at 6:13 am | Permalink

        Kitchen knives are mostly right handed unless they are absolutely symmetrical because the bevel of the serrations is on the wrong side. It should be on the right side on a left-handed knife and the left side for a right-handed knife. And yes, you can get a left-handed knife. You can find them at Anything Lefthanded and probably some other places.

    • Linda Calhoun
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 12:05 pm | Permalink

      I am right-handed, but left-thumbed.

      I peel an orange with my left hand, and also do any fine motor tasks which primarily use the thumb.

      I had an uncle who was naturally left-handed, but he was forced to write with his right hand, back in the days when left-handedness was considered a mark of evil. He became a draftsman, and it was a kick to watch him work. He had a pencil in each hand, drew with his left and lettered with his right.

      L

    • Mark R.
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 12:44 pm | Permalink

      I do everything left-handed except for some activities my dad taught me- mainly hunting and fishing. I don’t shoot anymore, but I’m a right handed shooter and angler. I taught myself right-handed guitar because those were the books I had when learning the chords. Before learning right-handed guitar, I would ‘air-guitar’ left-handed. It makes sense being a lefty and playing a right-handed guitar since the left hand does most of the dexterous and strength work. It seems strange that playing a right-handed guitar means the strumming hand is dominant. Don’t know why this is so. (Not to say strumming, plucking or picking is necessarily an easy part of guitar playing.)

      • Diane G
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 11:27 pm | Permalink

        I’ve always thought that about guitars, and also that doing all the delicate work with the left hand (for us right-handers) just shows how capable each hand is if we’d only work on it. On keyboards both hands can have intricate jobs to do.

        Once in a while I try to write with my left hand and am always amazed at how difficult it is!

        • Mark R.
          Posted August 14, 2018 at 1:14 pm | Permalink

          Yeah, I broke my left clavicle once and had to write with my right hand. Very difficult…it looked like I reverted to 2nd grade! lol!

  6. infiniteimprobabilit
    Posted August 13, 2018 at 8:03 am | Permalink

    I too burst out laughing at those two changing the guard. They looked exactly like those street mime performers playing androids.

    Do the military have no sense of the ridiculous, to notice how absurd they look? If they want people to take it seriously, they should do their rituals in a solemn and dignified fashion. Expecting watchers not to laugh at a choreographed absurdity like that is akin to doublethink.

    cr

    • Randall Schenck
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 8:18 am | Permalink

      If you are there and watch the whole process, including the marching back and forth in front of the memorial it is strange. I think they do a shift change every 20 or 30 minutes so the gun inspection takes place during the shift change. Some actually put in for this duty although I have no idea why.

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 8:51 am | Permalink

        It is, as you say in another comment, military theatre.

        Here’s changing the guard in 10 countries
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SOrWs9jupUQ

        The Russian one is notable for its amazing high goose step.
        The Arlington rifle inspection is there (No 6) and actually takes twice as long as in the clip PCC posted – at one point the officer seems to look down the barrel, which I thought was an absolute no-no in gun handling.
        I think I like the Taiwanese one (No 4) best, they have turned it into a juggling act.

        And there’s an awful lot of marching. And strange uniforms.

        cr

        • Randall Schenck
          Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:21 am | Permalink

          I think Taiwan gets the prize for most entertaining. The U.S. is just a nauseating inspection of the rifle. And not a rifle that is used by the real army. Maybe just a parade weapon.

        • Rita
          Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:32 am | Permalink

          Turkey wins the Grand Prize from the Ministry of Silly Walks, but they’re all pretty silly.

        • Jenny Haniver
          Posted August 13, 2018 at 10:23 am | Permalink

          I vote for the changing of the guard at the India Pakistan border. With both countries working together, and wearing fans on their heads, hey’ve choreographed a crazy dance of mimed aggression, even down to their thumbs. And it affords the audiences on both sides to engage in some fierce nationalistic fan activity.

          • Nicolaas Stempels
            Posted August 13, 2018 at 5:04 pm | Permalink

            Yes the Indian one is shameless, proud theatre, and they goose higher than the Russians. On a follow up clip there was even a fellah that actually managed to kick his foot over his shoulder past his head. There were even spectator stages. I also note that the Indians and Pakistani’s actually shake hands.
            The Thai one was, compared to the others, kinda informal. Maybe they didn’t know they were being filmed? Or is the headscratching part of the ritual?
            And yes, I expected some of the Turks to fall over.
            Very entertaining.

    • darrelle
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:38 am | Permalink

      Military rituals like the changing of the guard at the tomb of the unknown soldier are not really for the public. They are for the military personnel themselves. They are a means to create and maintain the history and culture of the military and are deemed by experts to be absolutely necessary to a well functioning military.

      • Randall Schenck
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:50 am | Permalink

        I find problems with that for a couple of reasons. First is that this is specifically done in front of tourists at Arlington. It is a show, granted to show extreme respect for the unknown soldier. Also, I do not think the military will function any differently with or without this particular even. The military does many things for symbolic reasons, I saw many of these things when I was in the service, but to say they were absolutely necessary – not so.

        • darrelle
          Posted August 13, 2018 at 11:12 am | Permalink

          Just to clarify I wasn’t relating my opinion. I’m simply relating what experts, people expert in creating and maintaining military units and the history thereof, say about rituals like this. Given how all human groups and subgroups throughout history and from grade school peer groups to national governments have developed or co-opted and adapted rituals that they consider very important to their identity, I do give the experts serious weight regarding this issue.

          That this particular ritual is done in front of tourists does not preclude such rituals from being more for military personnel than for civilians. Much more often than not such rituals are not done in front of the general public. Notice that many civilians don’t get it and think it’s funny or even ridiculous.

          • Randall Schenck
            Posted August 13, 2018 at 11:41 am | Permalink

            Civilians – many of them think it is funny? I don’t know where you get this but again I suspect it is wrong. For example, thousands of civilians turn out each year to watch the Blue Angels or Thunderbirds perform and I don’t see any laughing at that. But know for sure, this is entertainment and not what the everyday missions of both air force and navy is about. And if these performances were not done it would have little to no affect on the military function of the Navy or Air Force. You are of course welcome to consult with your experts on this.

            • darrelle
              Posted August 13, 2018 at 1:23 pm | Permalink

              Randall, I highly recommend you ask questions before responding because your reading comprehension sucks. It is impossible to converse with you. I’m not going to attempt it.

              • Randall Schenck
                Posted August 13, 2018 at 1:41 pm | Permalink

                My reading comprehension sucks. Thanks very much for that. I comprehend that on this specific subject you started and do not seem able to finish is the problem. I simply stated that you and your experts are incorrect in your conclusions and instead of any good evidence otherwise you attack me. That is exactly what you are not suppose to do on this site.

              • darrelle
                Posted August 14, 2018 at 12:47 pm | Permalink

                I’ll make an attempt.

                ”Civilians – many of them think it is funny? I don’t know where you get this but again I suspect it is wrong.”

                Jerry was sent this tweet / movie clip by Heather who said of it, “How can they do this without laughing?”

                Jerry then said, “Any spectator laughing would be admonished by the soldiers (I’ve seen that happen).” (my emphasis)

                Then there’s infiniteimprobabilit’s comment number 6, which you actually responded to. There were a few other comments indicating similar.

                With all of the above how am I supposed to take your comment that you don’t know where I got this? I got it by reading the OP and the comments right here. Not to mention experiencing similar attitudes fairly commonly throughout my life.

                And what do the Blue Angels and Thunderbirds have to do with verifying or refuting that some civilians find the solemn changing of the guard ceremony at the tomb of the unknown soldier funny? Not a thing. How am I supposed to interpret this? Are you knowingly arguing in bad faith or do you not understand what I wrote?

                ”You are of course welcome to consult with your experts on this.”

                You think it was improper for me to tell you that your reading comprehension sucks? Perhaps. But let me ask you, do you really think that your comment, quoted above, is not impolite? I don’t think anyone would mistake that for a polite comment. And you know what? That kind of comment is typical of you Randall. Before you admonish others about WEIT rules you really should look to your own commenting tendencies.

                As for my main point that military rituals are primarily for the military personnel themselves and that they are very important to create and maintain an effective military, all you’ve got to do is a simple internet search and you will be drowned in information to peruse. Here are a couple of the first links I came across.

                Torture and the Military Profession – Page 132 – Google Books Result. Excerpt . . .

                ”The importance of drill and ceremonial rituals in cultivating new recruits’ loyalty to and indentification with their units and the military institution as a whole is also evident in the number of hours dedicated to these aspects of basic training.”

                U.S. Army drill and ceremony provides discipline, espirt de corps for more than 238 years. Opening . . .

                ”Developed during the Revolutionary War, United States Army drill and ceremony is a necessary component of its legacy and future.”

                Frankly I’m surprised that this is even remotely contentious.

        • Heather Hastie
          Posted August 13, 2018 at 7:00 pm | Permalink

          My email to Jerry also commented on the skills of the soldiers.

          And although I think it looks hilarious, just for the record, I wouldn’t laugh at the Arlington National Cemetery.

          • Mark R.
            Posted August 13, 2018 at 8:05 pm | Permalink

            Me neither…I laughed during church service once when a friend showed me a stupid doodle of an offensive, naked organ. The aftermath was not funny in the least.

            • Heather Hastie
              Posted August 13, 2018 at 8:12 pm | Permalink

              You blasphemer! You’re going to hell! I’ll pray for your soul!

              • Mark R.
                Posted August 14, 2018 at 1:15 pm | Permalink

                🙂

          • Diane G
            Posted August 13, 2018 at 11:33 pm | Permalink

            I don’t think I’d laugh if someone were whirling a bayonet that close to my face! 😀

    • mikeyc
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:58 am | Permalink

      It does look ridiculous. I strongly urge you NOT to laugh at them though. Not only is it deeply disrespectful, you are unlikely to leave unmolested.

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 6:17 pm | Permalink

        If I laughed, it would not be with disrespect for the dead. It would be at the absurdity of the exaggerated mime performance which strikes me as utterly inappropriate (in the proper sense of the word) to such a solemn occasion. I’d laugh if I saw them performing that in the street. The incongruity of it in these circumstances just adds to the absurdity.

        That’s not respect for the dead, it’s just exaggerated militarism.

        cr

    • John Conoboy
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 10:21 am | Permalink

      Go to you tube and search for “border closing ceremony india pakistan”

      • Jenny Haniver
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 10:25 am | Permalink

        Yeah, that’s the best, and there are several videos, one featuring Michael Palin, but the resolution isn’t good.

    • Mark R.
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 12:46 pm | Permalink

      Maybe they’ll have a whole troupe of these rifle-jugglers in Trump’s military parade!

      • Claudia Baker
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 5:50 pm | Permalink

        god help us – what will the ‘Space Force’ changing of the guard be like?

        • Mark R.
          Posted August 13, 2018 at 8:06 pm | Permalink

          Light Sabers!!!

          • Diane G
            Posted August 13, 2018 at 11:34 pm | Permalink

            😀 😀

  7. BJ
    Posted August 13, 2018 at 8:39 am | Permalink

    That Facebook exchange reminds me of when Asghar Bokhari, one of the founding members of the Muslim Public Affairs Committee UK, claimed Mossad came into his house while he was sleeping and stole his shoe — a Zionist conspiracy to intimidate him into silence:

    5245417/https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/11673700/Muslim-campaigner-Zionists-crept-into-my-home-and-stole-my-shoe.html

    https://metro.co.uk/2015/06/14/british-muslim-campaigner-claims-zionists-broke-into-his-house-and-stole-his-shoe-

    • enl
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 3:25 pm | Permalink

      But it isn’t the Mossad. It is the freemasons. Or stonecutters….

      (I used to work with a person that really believed this crap… she loved the Simpsons episode as it exposed the truth, you see. But coded. So they wouldn’t know that they were exposed….. Or something like that. I could never follow the illogic)

      • BJ
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 8:37 pm | Permalink

        That’s…no way…come on…

  8. Roger
    Posted August 13, 2018 at 8:49 am | Permalink

    Keith Moon birthday alert. 10 more days to Keith Moon’s birthday.

    • BJ
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:26 am | Permalink

      But it will feel like three because he’ll black out for seven of them.

      • Roger
        Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:14 pm | Permalink

        You definitely don’t want to rent a hotel room with the guy, that’s for sure.

  9. Posted August 13, 2018 at 9:30 am | Permalink

    Something about the bacon tweet made me think of the Swedish movie director, lyricist, stand-up comedian and what not: Tage Danielsson.

    When Tage published his first real book (stories between actual covers) he insisted on having a text printed on the cover: Öppnas här (Open here).

    Around that time he also reminded his audience: “You are not supposed to speak of stupidity anymore. It’s called alternative intelligence now.”

  10. Posted August 13, 2018 at 10:30 am | Permalink

    Coin op payphones are rare but still around. I saw one recently in a National Park inn where there was no cell service. I came across one in the city once that was surrounded by people taking selfies in it.

  11. JonLynnHarvey
    Posted August 13, 2018 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

    The changing of the guard at Buckingham Palace in London is a much more leisurely affair.

    • Claudia Baker
      Posted August 13, 2018 at 5:51 pm | Permalink

      Yes, and I think Thailand wins the prize for the most cool and relaxed.

  12. Nicolaas Stempels
    Posted August 13, 2018 at 5:28 pm | Permalink

    Akiyoshi Kitaoka is one of the great producers of visual illusions.
    Stunning how the rectangle ‘disappeared’ halfway in front of our very eyes.
    Countershading is common. Meerkats have dark bellies for warming up in the morning in upright position facing the sun. Yet their dark bellies have a white ‘lining’ for the countershading when on all fours.

  13. grasshopper
    Posted August 13, 2018 at 6:01 pm | Permalink

    But which one is the mother, and which the cub?

    Who can ever make sense of cubist art?


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