Readers’ wildlife photos

Reader Joe Dickson sent me many batches of pictures, and here’s one with diverse wildlife.  His notes are indented.

First, the “teaser”:

We returned just today from a trip to the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge complex, about 200 miles north of this pair.  I have about 1500 photos, so it will take a couple of weeks to select, sort (mostly delete) and edit the new set.  Meanwhile, attached is a teaser – geese flying into the refuge just at sunrise so they appear illuminated from below.

Here are shots from a December trip primarily to see wintering waterfowl in the Merced and San Louis National Wildlife Refuges over in the California Central Valley, with some nice non-waterfowl bonuses. The most striking concentrations were Ross’s goose (Chen rossii) and snow goose (Chen caerulescens), often in mixed flocks and difficult to distinguish at a distance.

Although more dispersed, ducks were also present in the thousands, mostly northern shoveler (Anas clypeata), cinnamon teal (Anas cyanoptera) and northern pintail (Anas acuta) pictured in that order below.

The most common wader was the black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus).

 

Large flocks of geese flew out from the wetlands early in the morning, only to be found foraging in nearby fields.  All those I got close to seem to be Ross’s.

It wasn’t all waterfowl and waders. Here is a nice red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis).

A rather laid back coyote (Canis latrans).

And a Black-tailed deer (a subspecies of mule deerOdocoileus hemionus columbianus).

Finally, we did not see sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) on the ground this time but did catch them flying from farm fields back into the refuge in the evening.

9 Comments

  1. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted February 18, 2018 at 8:33 am | Permalink

    Love it

    That is a haggard-looking RTH

    Love the curve in the bird … flock (?)

    … and the bar continues to be lowered for RWP….

  2. rickflick
    Posted February 18, 2018 at 9:08 am | Permalink

    Beautiful photos. I love the high contrast stilts.

  3. Posted February 18, 2018 at 9:48 am | Permalink

    Very impressive

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    • ThyroidPlanet
      Posted February 18, 2018 at 9:55 am | Permalink

      Did you write “Sent from my iPhone” or was that really a reply from your iPhone and how do you do it?

  4. Posted February 18, 2018 at 12:56 pm | Permalink

    Simply beautiful. Stellar work as always, Joe.

  5. gravelinspector-Aidan
    Posted February 18, 2018 at 1:21 pm | Permalink

    mostly northern shoveler (Anas clypeata), cinnamon teal (Anas cyanoptera) and northern pintail (Anas acuta) pictured in that order below.

    I’m not birder, but even before getting to the “in that order” bit, I’d guessed that the “shoveller” was the one with the very wide beak.

  6. Mark R.
    Posted February 18, 2018 at 5:12 pm | Permalink

    Nice to see such large and healthy flocks of birds. Great shots, thanks!

  7. JohnnieCanuck
    Posted February 18, 2018 at 5:25 pm | Permalink

    I’m getting déja vu, all over again.
    Jan 28, 2018.

    Great photos, well worth a second glance.

  8. Posted February 18, 2018 at 5:58 pm | Permalink

    Nice photos. Love the birds.


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