Words that should be deep-sixed

Grania found this tw**t, which I think is right on the mark:

The words I especially hate here are “bae”, “totes”, “amazeballs”, “cray cray”, “whatevs”, “be like” and “epic”. Some of them, like “yolo”, “awks,”, and “well jel”, I’ve never heard before.  I’d add “genius” when used as an adjective, but we’ve been over that before.

“Wine o’clock”?????

195 Comments

  1. Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:33 pm | Permalink

    That list appears to be about 50% of the vocabulary of all the women I know on Facebook.

    • BJ
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:52 pm | Permalink

      Yup.

    • Heather Hastie
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:02 pm | Permalink

      Perhaps it’s a problem with who you attract as friends? I’ve never used any of those words.

      There is a certain (male) friend on FB though, who shall remain nameless, who uses the word noms rather a lot. Surely that’s a short step from nom nom? 😀

  2. Gordon
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:33 pm | Permalink

    “Mum” as in “my mum” when ‘mother’ should be used.

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:34 pm | Permalink

      ‘Mother’ sounds too much like Norman Bates.

    • bundorgarden
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:09 pm | Permalink

      Thank you! I totally agree! They even talk about Hitler’s mum these days.

      • Gordon
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 6:16 pm | Permalink

        I gather newspapers prefer Mum as in “Mass-Murdering Mum kills 20” or “Mum of 6 wins Nobel Prize” rather than “Woman”

  3. Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:33 pm | Permalink

    Wine o’clock is beer o’clock for pseuds.

    • Christopher
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:12 pm | Permalink

      Beer-thirty is how I’ve always heard it. There’s even a bar on the way to Lawrence, KS with that name. Neither that one nor wine o’clock other me but the rest of the list I find quite irritating.

      • yazikus
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:22 pm | Permalink

        I say ‘beer o’clock’ whenever I accidentally get to the store/mart around six pm. The lines are always super long and filled with individuals buying just beer.

    • Posted January 18, 2018 at 8:51 am | Permalink

      We have gin o’clock, currently just two hours away 😎

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:05 am | Permalink

        In the future, or in the past.
        The sun is over the yardarm. Somewhere.

  4. Paul S
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:36 pm | Permalink

    I’ve never heard some of these.

    Bæ/bae is a Danish word for poop.

    I like it.

    • Posted January 18, 2018 at 10:17 am | Permalink

      I ever never heard the majority of these words. I am pleased with my lack of social integration.

      Bae? Does that mean obey me? I will Google it.

  5. Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:36 pm | Permalink

    Every mental hospital should have a ward set aside for people who say ‘methinks’.

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:39 pm | Permalink

      Also ‘doth’ and ‘protest too much’.

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:39 pm | Permalink

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weasel_program

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:49 pm | Permalink

      And “ergo”

    • Andy Lowry
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:56 pm | Permalink

      Uh-oh. Do I have to stop saying “forsooth,” too?

      • Kevin
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:05 pm | Permalink

        Prithee?

    • nicky
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:48 pm | Permalink

      Well, I think that ‘methinks’ and ‘meseems’ can be useful alternatives to IMMO, I’d say.

      • MKray
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:13 pm | Permalink

        Methinks that if `methinks’ has a problem, it is that it is actually archaic. Use with irony.

    • Heather Hastie
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:04 pm | Permalink

      Oh dear. I’m in trouble with you lot. I use them jokingly, not seriously though. Does that help?

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 9:52 pm | Permalink

      Such people also tend to write/say ‘end of’ when they have finished ranting.

      • Kevin
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 6:04 am | Permalink

        Usually ‘end of’ means that the person thinks they have made the definitive statement on the subject and that no further discussion or contrary opinion is necessary.

        I take ‘end of’ as provocative since the opinion expressed is usually the opposite to what I think on the subject or is often anything but convincing in spite of the rant.

        Often used in discussions about politics or dogmatic ideologies: eg. libertarian economics, Objectivist stuff

        • infiniteimprobabilit
          Posted January 18, 2018 at 6:13 am | Permalink

          I find they tend to say “That is all”. As if that was the final word on the matter.

          (That’s the right-wing tactic for ending an outrageously offensive statement. The left-wing counterpart for similar obnoxiousness is “Just sayin'”. )

          cr

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:08 am | Permalink

      Methinks that methinks is a perfectly fine word. It does, in the creosote adverts words, what it says on the tin.

  6. YF
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:37 pm | Permalink

    I must confess, I’m not a fan of ‘deep-six’ either!

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:40 pm | Permalink

      Too bad; suck it up!

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:41 pm | Permalink

      It’s nautical slang and perfectly cromulent.

      • Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:26 pm | Permalink

        Crom never liked measurements in fathoms. 😉

        • Ken Kukec
          Posted January 17, 2018 at 5:23 pm | Permalink

          Crom’s cool with “furlongs”; I’ve heard His name taken in vain at the track.

          • Posted January 17, 2018 at 5:32 pm | Permalink

            I’m sure. As he took pleasure at the women’s lamentations

      • XCellKen
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:39 pm | Permalink

        Won’t somebody PLEASE think of the children ?

        • infiniteimprobabilit
          Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:17 am | Permalink

          🙂

        • gravelinspector-Aidan
          Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:12 am | Permalink

          Swift wrote an essay doing nothing but thinking of the children, and their gastronomnomnomic potential.

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:11 am | Permalink

      I never thought of the etymology of that until now.
      I’m guessing it’s a cognate with “six foot (1.8m) under”?

  7. Teresa Carson
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:37 pm | Permalink

    We have to keep Yolo, or Davis won’t have a county! (It means “you only live once.”)

  8. Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:38 pm | Permalink

    “Banter”?

    • Andy Lowry
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

      Yes, I wondered about that too. Maybe it’s being used in some slangy way that I haven’t heard.

      • Barney
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:50 pm | Permalink

        It’s worth noting (for other words too) that the author is from Kent, England. That accounts for things that sound very English to me – “preggers”, for instance.

        “Banter” (and worse, ‘bantz”) is used to mean alleged wit and conversation that those taking part is admirable and the pinnacle of how to spend your time (“Great bantz last night, lads!”), but which is probably simple-minded, boorish, and repetitive. Think of the conversation on Top Gear, if you’ve seen it, or people of less ability trying to ape it. It might well contain a lot of this list, in fact.

        • Posted January 17, 2018 at 9:55 pm | Permalink

          Archbishop of Banterbury is someone who gives good bantz

        • infiniteimprobabilit
          Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:18 am | Permalink

          ‘preggers’ is a bit lame and very old hat.

          I think ‘up the duff’ is way more expressive

          cr

    • BJ
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:54 pm | Permalink

      I was about to note that. That’s just a noun that for a very specific kind of dialogue.

      • Ken Kukec
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 5:26 pm | Permalink

        aka “badinage” or “persiflage”

        • BJ
          Posted January 17, 2018 at 6:16 pm | Permalink

          You talkin bout raillery?

  9. Toni Jordon
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:39 pm | Permalink

    You are starting to sound like that old guy who keeps yelling, “Get off my lawn!”

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:42 pm | Permalink

      I’ve already said that about myself (there’s a “Get off my lawn” category), but this comment is a bit rude!

      • Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:50 pm | Permalink

        And we love you for it! 🙂

      • BJ
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:55 pm | Permalink

        It’s OK, Jerry. I’ve been an old guy shouting “get off my lawn” since I was 23.

        And I really wish kids would turn down their damn rapping music.

        • Ken Kukec
          Posted January 17, 2018 at 5:32 pm | Permalink

          Paul Lynde — is that you in Bye Bye Birdie?

        • phil
          Posted January 17, 2018 at 5:59 pm | Permalink

          You are not seriously suggesting that rapping noise is music, are you?

          • BJ
            Posted January 17, 2018 at 6:09 pm | Permalink

            No, it’s the rappists who are! I disagree with the rappists and their rapping music fans.

      • pali
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 3:46 am | Permalink

        If it makes you feel any better, I’m only 32 and I still regularly catch myself thinking “these damn kids…” when it comes to my neighbors (mostly early-20s at the oldest college students, and damned hooligans from my aged perspective!). 😉

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:17 am | Permalink

        My botanical iggorance is preventing me from describing a “lawn” in eye-watering, jaw cracking detail. Something L would attach his name to.
        I’m sure someone can (dis-)obilge.

    • nicky
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:50 pm | Permalink

      The lawn on which we are gambolling. Thin ice, methinks!

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:26 am | Permalink

        There is a short and horrible geological literature on scalding volcanic mud pits covered by verdant greenery.
        There is a longer literature with fewer 3rd degree burns, on plain vanilla liquid swamps under greenery. Basically, lovely flat green things should get your “avoid” neurons firing.
        This post was brought to you by the clothing “wetsuit”, and the search term “bog-trotting” ; we are not at home to the sport of bog-snorkeling. That’s in Somerset, IIRC.

  10. Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:40 pm | Permalink

    Banter and staycation should stay.

  11. Jay
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:41 pm | Permalink

    Somewhere on Microsoft’s website, appears the word “upskill,” a verb, apparently, meaning to increase one’s skill, especially by taking a course offered by Microsoft.

  12. Barry Lyons
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:42 pm | Permalink

    I can’t stand “bae”! But if I had to choose one of these to NOT destroy, I’d probably go with “methinks” (because it sounds like pseudo-Shakespeare).

    “Amazeballs” is funny, but I don’t use it.

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:55 pm | Permalink

      How does one pronounce “bae”?

      I saw it and I thought, “what have they got against British Aerospace?”

      • Andy Lowry
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

        It’s pronounced “bay.” It’s for when you’re too busy to say “baby” as a term of endearment. Mustn’t waste time with extra syllables!

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:19 am | Permalink

        Same thought here.

        cr

  13. Liz
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:43 pm | Permalink

    I can’t stand most of those. Staycation I’ve only heard once and it was used to mean that the person was taking a week off but staying local. I hate preggers. Totes, amazeballs, cray cray. Awful. I’ll see nom nom here and there on Facebook and it’s usually moms talking about their babies eating yummy foods. That doesn’t bother me too much.

  14. Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:48 pm | Permalink

    “Hey” as a salutation is moving toward the top of my list.

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:54 pm | Permalink

      I am beginning to think there is no universally acceptable greeting amongst anglophones.

      In a recent post by PCC(E) on this subject (words to be banished), someone commented that they hated “good morning”.

      I can see disliking “hey” as too casual (I do use it sometimes, but only to people I know well). But good morning? That construction is almost universal across languages.

      • Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

        I should have added that it is not particularly offensive if used in very informal settings among good friends. What I was thinking of was its use on network news, among other places, e.g. And now to our White House Correspondent – Hey Peter, Hey Hoda.

        • Posted January 18, 2018 at 8:25 am | Permalink

          Oh, I agree in that usage! Ugh!

      • Ross
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:13 pm | Permalink

        Come to the Isle of Man where the traditional greeting to people of all genders and ages is “Hey Boy!”

        It’s falling out of use as more UK-ites come over but it’s still fairly common, To best effect it has to be in the local accent which robs it of the risk that a recipient will take the “boy” element badly

        * as part of our cunning plan to confuse Americans and other foreigners, the IOM is an tiny island between England and Ireland but it isn’t actually part the UK. It is in the British Isles though!

        • Kevin
          Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:30 pm | Permalink

          My grandfather used to say “Hey Boy!”: he was born in Wales. The Welsh also say “Boyoh” in much the same way.

          I just learnt that the the Isle of Man is a “Crown Dependency”: not sure whether that means that it is dependent on the UK or the UK is dependent on it:)

          Apparently the Queen has the title of “Lord of Mann”, spreading further linguistic gender confusion. I suppose that “Hey Boy!” would do for her too!

          • boggy
            Posted January 18, 2018 at 1:08 am | Permalink

            Jersey and the other Channel Islands are also Crown Dependencies which means they will be defended if they are invaded but they were not when the Germans invaded in 1939.

        • gravelinspector-Aidan
          Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:33 am | Permalink

          Jam, circa 1978, “Hey Boy, you got any money?”

          Not a good start to an evening with a bottle of wine and a take-away curry.

    • EliHershkovitz
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:14 pm | Permalink

      As a teen (long, long ago) I might address a letter thusly, “Sunny salutations on a salubrious day!” My G-d, I was such a pompous ass.

      • Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:17 pm | Permalink

        I might take that over “hey” 🙂

      • bundorgarden
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 9:38 pm | Permalink

        ‘thusly’!! That word has to go!

    • Hempenstein
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 10:37 pm | Permalink

      Suspect that Hey is Old Norse. In any event, it’s Swedish (spelled Hej and pronounced exactly as Hey/Hay).

    • pali
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 3:55 am | Permalink

      I’m fine with “hey”, but even at the ripe old age of 32 I’m already sick of how “how are you?” or “how’s it going?” have become greetings – not actual inquiries, but greetings, where two people may meet and exchange “What’s up?” and “How’s it going?” without either actually answering the stated questions. As someone who works register at a neighborhood store, it is a regular annoyance for me to say “Hello” to a customer, have them respond with “how’s it going?”, and then completely ignore a response when I give one (or just go through the meaningless repetition of “good, you?” “good, thanks” before we stop talking).

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 5:13 am | Permalink

        I don’t mind ‘how are you’ but I always have to remind myself that it’s not a serious question to be taken literally. I have a tendency to answer it, much to the disconcertment (is that a word?) of the person who asked it.

        cr

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:41 am | Permalink

        Try “Fit like [loon | quine]”, just to add a little spice to your liquidity.
        I particularly like “quine” as a gender-recognising indicator. Compared to the much-complained about “luv”, “pet”, “hunny” (“hun” for males), what does “quine” contract? “Queen.”
        Of course, when a screaming queen flounces up to the bar at the local poof palace, it takes on the opposite meaning. It’s slang, you expected consistency?

        • gravelinspector-Aidan
          Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:46 am | Permalink

          Bloody AutoIncorrect! “Loquacity”, not liquidity!
          ( I do like that My phone makes “Bloody AutoIncorrect ” a 4-press sequence. Seems fitting, somehow.)

  15. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:49 pm | Permalink

    I read all the science posts

    ^^^^couldnt help it

    … hey, how about a good ‘ol satirical idea : convert scientific terms into their low-literacy equivalents. I’ll try:

    Restriction digest = triggy
    Quantum electrodynamics = Q-dick

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:57 pm | Permalink

      I’ve never heard of restriction digest …

    • yazikus
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 5:01 pm | Permalink

      I wonder whether those fire-spreading raptors are totes ‘yolo!’ before they drop their load?

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:48 am | Permalink

      Sorry, but Prof Ice-bucket beat you to “QED” for …. well QED.

  16. Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:51 pm | Permalink

    Disrespect when used as a verb. Hate it, hate it, hate it.

    • Linda Calhoun
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:14 pm | Permalink

      Respect is also a verb. Does that bother you, too?

      L

      • Ken Kukec
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 5:38 pm | Permalink

        Bet not when Aretha spells it!

      • Posted January 18, 2018 at 8:28 am | Permalink

        No, not a bit. It’s been used that was for a really long time.

        I know that disliking neologisms is a futile effort. Nevermind, I still hate it. I think it’s because it’s an integral part of the current offense culture.

        • Posted January 18, 2018 at 8:53 am | Permalink

          Although “disrepect” as a verb apparently has a venerable history, I don’t remember it used a verb until the last couple of decades, and then as part of the offense culture current in the US.

          In my 1965 edition of Webster’s New World Dictionary, the entry for disrespect is, in full:

          (dis’ ri-spekt’), n. lack of respect; discourtesy; rudeness. v.t. to have or show lack of respect for. –disrespectful, adj. — disrespectfully adv., –disrespectfullness n..

          So, clearly, it is acceptable English.

          And I still hate it.

          à chacun son goût.

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 6:29 pm | Permalink

      It’s been around as a verb for 400 years, preceding its use as a noun.

      https://www.etymonline.com/word/disrespect

      • Posted January 18, 2018 at 8:31 am | Permalink

        Not in typical USian speech — until very recently, as part of the offense culture.

        I’d be curious to see substantial citations in US writing or speech in the 20th century prior to the 1980s or 90s.

        • Posted January 19, 2018 at 6:19 am | Permalink

          Is “USian” typical anywhere?

          • Posted January 19, 2018 at 8:56 am | Permalink

            Sure, in the USA, for the great bulk of language. I’d listen to local TV announcers for sampling. Pronunciation might vary; but the words themselves are pretty consistent.

            • Barney
              Posted January 19, 2018 at 10:06 am | Permalink

              ‘USian’ is, of course, the kind of “word” that belong in the OP list.

              • Posted January 19, 2018 at 12:09 pm | Permalink

                I have come to appreciate the term since everyone from Canada to Argentina is an American. Admittedly, American is generally taken as someone from the USA, but I have met many folks in the other Americas who would prefer USian over American.

            • Posted January 26, 2018 at 1:51 am | Permalink

              Despite living in the US for years and reading US media for decades I’ve never seen it. Apart from Urban Dictionary, the only references to it I’ve found are people complaining about it.

      • Posted January 18, 2018 at 8:31 am | Permalink

        Never heard this as a verb until I was at least 30 years old.

  17. Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:52 pm | Permalink

    If you ban “methinks”, you’ll have a mob of enraged thespians after you. Shakespeare used the word in Hamlet.

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

      I’m fine with people using it so long as they’ve been dead a few centuries.

      • Kevin
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:56 pm | Permalink

        Most people I know haven’t been dead for quite so long!

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:52 am | Permalink

      Mental image of being flayed …. nay, “flensed”… by thespian with rubber knives.
      Second mental image : marketing enactment of first image to a “select clientele”. As Mary from the bus would say, “with leather?”

  18. Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:53 pm | Permalink

    I used to be considered as having a good vocabulary, but very few of these “words” are in it. I must be hanging around with the wrong people.

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:54 pm | Permalink

      The right people.

      • nicky
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:59 pm | Permalink

        Must admit most of the terms mentioned appear alien to me too.
        Stacation? Hollibobs? Totes? Chillax? Well jel? Gawjus? I haven’t a clue what they mean, and I’ve never seen them before, I think I must be kinda backward, if not retarded.

    • Heather Hastie
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:15 pm | Permalink

      I said above that I don’t use any of those words, but I missed methinks. I use that for fun – not seriously. And I think my vocabulary is reasonably good too. So we’re both in the same boat.

  19. Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:58 pm | Permalink

    There’s a Harry Enfield sketch about the Scousers where Terry is about to get married but can’t remember his bride-to-be’s name so he just calls her ‘Preggers’.

  20. John Dentinger
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 2:58 pm | Permalink

    When I retired from teaching English–and I was very much on the prescriptivist side of things, I adopted as my mantra, “change is good.” Not giving a sh*t has served me well, but I confess I will never accept ‘wellness.’

    • phil
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 6:07 pm | Permalink

      Old Chinese proverb: Change is good, when it is good.

  21. Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:01 pm | Permalink

    I’m not ready to give up amazeballs yet. No one else around me uses it, and they give me the weirdest looks when I use it.

    • Christopher
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:17 pm | Permalink

      Amazeballs sounds like it ought to be the male equivalent of the vajzzle.

      • BJ
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:59 pm | Permalink

        Very good!

      • Liz
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:59 pm | Permalink

        Amazeballs would be the result of a pejazzle session. Pejazzle is the act of the dickoration.

        • Liz
          Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:59 pm | Permalink

          decoration*

          • Posted January 17, 2018 at 6:56 pm | Permalink

            I had to look it up. You were right the first time and you invented a new word that already needs to go. 🙂

            • Liz
              Posted January 18, 2018 at 8:27 am | Permalink

              Ha. True. Pejazzle parties out. Pajama parties in. I had to look it up also. Sort of odd.

          • gravelinspector-Aidan
            Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:01 pm | Permalink

            Sorry, but “dickoration” has already entered my vocabulary. I haven’t decided what it means yet, but that will … spurt forth in its own good time.
            Actually, I just get the feeling that a certain politician of orange permatan and implausible hair is in the frame. And I don’t mean Robert Kilroy-Silk!

      • Posted January 17, 2018 at 5:38 pm | Permalink

        That’s the context in which I use it on my CV.

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:51 pm | Permalink

      I only use ‘totes’ and ‘amazeballs’ on my CV.

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:05 pm | Permalink

        When I translate my resumé (not using the ‘Merkin) into German and Polish, I will try to remember to incorporate it.

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:57 am | Permalink

      It has a certain place. With a thick application of sarcasm.
      “The Sun has risen in the East!” — “Amazeballs”!”

  22. bundorgarden
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:13 pm | Permalink

    Misspoke when you lie. It hasnt reached Australia yet as common usage, but give it time!

  23. bundorgarden
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:14 pm | Permalink

    Misspoke when you MEAN lie, is what I meant to say……

  24. Barry Jones
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

    I was always miffed upon hearing somebody in an argument use the phrase “same difference”.

  25. Jake Sevins
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:45 pm | Permalink

    Common phrases around here that annoy me, “bougie” (meaning “bourgeois” and pronounced “boo-jee”), and “you do you” often as “you do you bae” or “you do you bear”.

    “Awesome sauce” seems to have mercifully died.

  26. Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:50 pm | Permalink

    ‘Epic’ should stay IF it’s used correctly.

  27. naveen1941
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:51 pm | Permalink

    Honestly I don’t give any importance to any words, liked or not by some activists. I use words commonly found in any text. Who gives anyone authority to ban words? They will go out of use by themselves.

  28. naveen1941
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:53 pm | Permalink

    Honestly I don’t give any importance to any words, liked or not by some activists. I use words commonly found in any text. Who gives anyone authority to ban words? They will go out of use by themselves.

    I didn’t use this email before

  29. DrBrydon
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 3:55 pm | Permalink

    Hun? What are we supposed to call the Gemans? Jerry or Boche?

    • XCellKen
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:44 pm | Permalink

      You misspelled it. Its GMen, and its 30s slang for FBI agents

    • boggy
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 5:01 am | Permalink

      Krauts.

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:07 pm | Permalink

      Don’t, whatever you do, call the Germans late for lunch!

  30. BJ
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:01 pm | Permalink

    I only use two of these words: banter and epic. Banter is just a normal word, and I only use epic in the properly, as when talking about a film or event of sweeping proportions.

    • Posted January 17, 2018 at 5:34 pm | Permalink

      Banter is a fine word. I don’t know why it’s on the list. The other words are either nonsense words or abbreviations. They are all redundant.

      If we can’t use the word ‘banter’ what word do we use to denote banter? ‘Repartee’? ‘Taking the piss’?

      • BJ
        Posted January 17, 2018 at 6:20 pm | Permalink

        Ken listed some above, but I prefer raillery to his suggestions. Persiflage and badinage will sound a touch pretentious to most people. Repartee is also a fine choice and one I probably use more often than banter.

      • Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:59 am | Permalink

        “It’s perfectly ordinary banter, Squiffy. Bally Jerry, pranged his kite right in the how’s-your-father; hairy blighter, dicky-birded, feathered back on his sammy, took a waspy, flipped over on his Betty Harpers and caught his can in the Bertie.”
        http://www.montypython.net/scripts/RAFbanter.php

  31. KEVIN E MEREDITH
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:09 pm | Permalink

    Okay, this list just made me laugh. I’m laughing now, still. I’ve heard most of these words before, but never saw a complete list, and the high concentration of was just sort of an overdose. But where’s “peeps?” How could peeps have dodged that list?

    Virtually all of the English language was at some point mispronunciation, the bastardization of foreign terms, bad grammar or, per above, words that I have no doubt pissed the majority of that day’s speakers off.

    Question I’d love to ask Shakespeare: “So, what words and expressions most annoy you?”

    I bet he’d say something like “Shirt. You ever heard that word? People are saying it all the time now. And great. As in, not huge, but just really good. God it pisses me off!”

  32. XCellKen
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:34 pm | Permalink

    Get Off My Grass !!!

    Thanx for all the Lulz !!!

  33. Thanny
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:41 pm | Permalink

    I’m not so much bothered by new fake words. Most of them will disappear in the near future, as passing fads are wont to do.

    I find it annoying when existing words with well-established meanings are given new, stupid meanings. My most recent peeve is “thirsty”. Now, if you want to indicate your desire to drink something, you’re likely to incur sniggers from juveniles and morons.

    It’s also annoying when completely inoffensive labels like “midget” or “Oriental” are magically transformed into slurs by PC fanatics. Their suggestions for replacements – “little people” and “Asian”, respectively – are awful or nonsensical (half of Asian people aren’t “Asian”).

    • XCellKen
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 4:46 pm | Permalink

      Murder On The Asian Express

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:25 am | Permalink

      ‘Thirsty’? I’m only aware of one meaning for that and it is usually assuaged by beer.

      What other meaning could it possibly have?

      cr

    • Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:53 am | Permalink

      The little people = fairy folk! You don’t want to cross them!

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:11 pm | Permalink

        An t’shithean!
        Brings an entirely old meaning to “Hill of the Fairies”

  34. Ken Kukec
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 5:42 pm | Permalink

    “Hun” as in, like, Attila?

    • grasshopper
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 8:09 pm | Permalink

      That reminds me of Matilda The Nun. She was’t popular, either, and got deep-sixed into the deepest Abbess.

      • Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:48 am | Permalink

        …or the poet, Atilla the Stockbroker
        http://attilathestockbroker.com/

        • gravelinspector-Aidan
          Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

          One of my musical heroes!
          “Contributory Negligence” got me through many a dark night of the thumb.
          Actually … double checks memory … the ONLY act for whom I’ve brought tickets twice.

    • Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:47 am | Permalink

      Which is probably a nickname meaning ‘Little father’…?

  35. Ken Kukec
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 6:17 pm | Permalink

    As a certifiable old fart, I figure that, by the time any current slang makes its way to my eye or ear, it’s already fallen out of fashion. Accordingly, I trust myself to use it only with a pronounced ironic twist.

    Not that I have any objection to slang and jive-talk in general, mind you. Hell, I talk that talk alla time myself, but most of mine dates back to ’50s jazz musicians and rail-riding hobos from the 1930s. And, of course, the Sixties Sex-&-Drugs-&-Rock’n’Roll argot that flows like aural mother’s milk for me.

  36. Posted January 17, 2018 at 6:31 pm | Permalink

    When I lived in France we regularly had “cheese o’clock”. Looking back, it probably wasn’t much different to wine o’clock – or in some circles, beer o’clock.

    • Jenny Haniver
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 7:11 pm | Permalink

      What the heck would that be in French? Fromage o’l’horloge? Something’s lost in translation.

      • Posted January 17, 2018 at 7:25 pm | Permalink

        I think the translation is either “maintenant” or “à tout moment”

        • Jenny Haniver
          Posted January 17, 2018 at 8:07 pm | Permalink

          That sounds more like it.

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:20 pm | Permalink

        Nous avons soif et faim,
        C’est l’heure pour fromage et vin!

        Comment ça va?

  37. Matthew North
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 6:35 pm | Permalink

    Most of these make me cringe, I agree. But a couple I associate with modern Internet parlance. Lolz and Epic, for example. Staycation is playfull or cute I think. The ones in the list that are absolutely cringeworthy are, Bae, Cray cray, Be like, Preggers, Nom nom or Noms, Hubs/Hubby/Hubster. The others I’ve never seen on threads, except maybe, Methinks, which we can thank Shakespeare for bringing to our attention.

  38. Posted January 17, 2018 at 6:40 pm | Permalink

    Two phrases from my profession that I would like to see disappear: “big data” and “data science”. Unfortunately, given current trends, these aren’t going anywhere for awhile.

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:42 pm | Permalink

      I see your annoyance. The 199ps seem to have dropped a (student) generation from “computing science” into “programming”, as if you could divorce understanding what you are asking the processor to do, from the language you use to ask it.
      I’ve seen several “MOOC” courses recently which describe themselves as “showing how to solve `big data` problems” … but they’re introducing “computer science” issues which were just part of the subject in the 1980s. An algorithm that makes two random reads into mass storage then a comparison in main memory is going to suck compared to one that only makes one ransom read. Because mass storage has latency, and it doesn’t matter if it’s a 30 second latency to rewind the tape, or a 30 ms latency for the disc to rotate so you can read (then parse!) the hard disc sector.
      OTOH, even if you have 96GB of “main memory” (random read, 30 ns), you can still fill it easily if you’re chewing a TB data set.
      There is a bloody good reason that Fortran built a metric shit-ton of numerically *efficient* algorithms, and of this month’s language Dr l’heure doesn’t use that, your performance is going to suck, if it doesn’t flat-out crash.
      I hung the University’s mainframe for several minutes using a naive Ackerman’s Function implementation, and stolen (Post-It !!!) professor’s credentials. Naughty GravelInspector! When Ah were nobbut a lad!

  39. grasshopper
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 8:01 pm | Permalink

    Words! I don’t even read my dictionary any more.

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:45 pm | Permalink

      Not even the index?

      • grasshopper
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 2:20 pm | Permalink

        LOL

  40. Posted January 17, 2018 at 8:46 pm | Permalink

    The gentleman doth protest too much, methinks.

    In this, dear sir, you are working against Shakespeare.

  41. J Cook
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 9:05 pm | Permalink

    Yolo County is between SF bay and Sacramento and next to Napa County

    • Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:52 am | Permalink

      Aha! Send me a postcard!

  42. Filippo
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 10:06 pm | Permalink

    I’ve never seen any of these locutions before.

    I feel so guilty and – what’s the word/phrase? – “uncool” and unhipster and un-“edgy.”

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:47 pm | Permalink

      Knocking around with the rather abrasive personalities here will knock the edginess off the most adamantine of personalities.

  43. Hempenstein
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 10:44 pm | Permalink

    Haven’t heard some of these, but one nobody’s mentioned is Dope, meaning Very Cool. At least one guy I know with an undergrad degree from a prestigious U and who is a partner in a successful brewpub uses it all the time. The other partner not as much. I just cringe.

    • Doug
      Posted January 17, 2018 at 11:20 pm | Permalink

      Another one: The shit, as in “Her singing is the shit.” Yes, it’s a compliment.

      • Hempenstein
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:10 am | Permalink

        Yep, that one too. First heard yrs ago down in SW PA, where the average intellectual capacity seems somewhat lacking (based on relatives who live down there).

  44. JonLynnHarvey
    Posted January 17, 2018 at 11:35 pm | Permalink

    Many of these have been polluted by modern overuse in cutesy ways. “Methinks” is actually a real Elizabethan English, and of course should be kept in performances of “Hamlet”.

    “Well jel” is an old Essex slang, and become popular due to a TV series “The Only Way is Essex”, much the way the dialect of a certain seaside town in England became Hollywood “pirate” talk after actor Robert Newton used it in his performance of Long John Silver in “Treasure Island”.

    “preggers” is a fairly old Brit slang. Perhaps we should allow people to say it if done so in a Brit accent??

    The others are I think all Internet modernisms.

    Although almost all of these are defined in the online “urban dictionary”, it often has no info on their origin (which may be impossible!!),

    But yes these are tiresome. I would especially suggest that the phrase “epic fail” is an epic fail.

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:52 pm | Permalink

      He who mentions the “Urban Dictionary” (of which there are several, mutually vampiring) is condemned to find the Profanisaurus. Enjoy!
      Any other Roger Mellie fans?

  45. infiniteimprobabilit
    Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:12 am | Permalink

    My current bane is “Ossum” (spelt ‘awesome’). It crops up everywhere.

    “Would you like sugar in your coffee?”
    “That’d be awesome”.

    [Rant mode ON]
    NO IT FLAMING WOULDN’T. The second coming of Jesus would be awesome. A volcanic eruption would be awesome. If you’re in the right mood a tropical sunset might – just – be awesome. The only thing awesome about sugar in your blasted cappucino is your staggering ignorance of the English language, you twerp.
    [/Rant]

    A close second is “Failure is not an option”. Failure is always a possibility and reciting that silly phrase like a mantra is going to make precisely no difference. I look forward to your abject and humiliating failure. Have a nice day.

    [Please note “you” above is not addressed to any reader of this website…]

    cr

    • Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:50 am | Permalink

      Well say, yes, sugar fills me with awe too! The way it is refined, leaves me… quite… emotional!

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted January 18, 2018 at 4:42 pm | Permalink

        If so, you should go to Fiji and follow the little narrow-gauge sugar cane train to the wharf at Lautoka. Because there beside the road you will see a hill of brown sugar. It will blow your mind!

        cr

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 1:03 pm | Permalink

      A close second is “Failure is not an option”.

      I find this particularly galling when delivered over a satellite phone link from literally half a world away.
      ‘scuse me, Fuckface on 5 times my pay, but if YOUR idea fails, it’s not you going to be burning to death, it’s us. You want us to “get a grip”, well I’ll see you in the fire-filled room, trying to get a seal on your buddy’s face mask by the light of the jetting flame above our heads. Let’s see you get a grip then.
      (rant off)
      I’m going to have to do that course again, in the nears future. To prove that I can control my terror, breathing, and bowels simultaneously. [Yawn] Another day at the office. Filled your car recently?

      • Kevin
        Posted January 28, 2018 at 6:59 pm | Permalink

        Getting a bit heated there (literally).

    • Hempenstein
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 4:44 pm | Permalink

      Awesome’s OK, but I really like Toadly Ossum, but only in print version.

      • Posted January 18, 2018 at 4:59 pm | Permalink

        And if it is visually awesome – Op Ossum.

  46. Bruce Gorton
    Posted January 18, 2018 at 4:00 am | Permalink

    Woke. It is what happens when hipsters discover politics.

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted January 18, 2018 at 1:09 pm | Permalink

      “politics”
      You spelled “shilelagh” wrongly. After you meet “shilelagh”, you either die, or “you is woke”, with a new appreciation of “42”

  47. Posted January 18, 2018 at 11:49 am | Permalink

    I have not heard most of those. Clearly I move in more refined circles…

    BUT Nothing wrong with methinks, methinks!

  48. Posted January 18, 2018 at 12:57 pm | Permalink

    Getting rid of “epic” would tick off the people who do Agile software development and so on.

    Then again, is that a bad thing?

  49. Orange G
    Posted January 18, 2018 at 2:34 pm | Permalink

    perfect storm

  50. Hempenstein
    Posted January 28, 2018 at 9:30 am | Permalink

    Another one that’s very over-used: Iconic. Every goddam thing is iconic anymore (often when awesome has already been used in the same sentence).

  51. Kevin
    Posted January 28, 2018 at 6:57 pm | Permalink

    Could I suggest “aweless” to counteract “awesome”


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