Readers’ wildlife photos

Yesterday I put up part I of reader Joe Dickinson’s wildlife photographs from India. Today we have part II, and Joe’s notes are indented. This shows some of the urban wildlife that abounds in India:

Continuing with India, here are shots from diverse locations as specified.

We saw the ring-necked parakeet (Psittacula krameri) many places.  These are one the grounds of the Taj Mahal.

This red-wattled lapwing (Vanellus indicus) was on the grounds of the Jai Mahal Palace Hotel where we stayed on the road from Delhi to Jaipur.

This young Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was inside the Agra Fort.

Some bats (species unknown), a palm squirrel (Funambulus palmarum) and a swarm of bees (species unknown) were all at the remarkable carved temples at Kujuraho.  I had to include one of the temples because they are so wonderful. [JAC: see my post on the Khajuraho temples here.]

Here are two more rhesus macaques.  The first, giving a threat display (from which I hastily retreated) is on a trail above the Woodstock School in Mussoorie.  The second, apparently trying to drink from the wrong end of an empty coke bottle, is along the trail to  Surkanda Devi, a popular pilgrimage spot in the Himalaya foothills.

Grey langurs (probably Semnopithecus schistaceus) hang around the Woodstock School.

Finally, a view in evening light from the top of the trail where we encountered the aggressive rhesus.

 

14 Comments

  1. Randall Schenck
    Posted January 9, 2018 at 8:13 am | Permalink

    Some really good up close photography of India. Thanks for that.

  2. rickflick
    Posted January 9, 2018 at 8:28 am | Permalink

    Wow. Such a rich environment! India is on my bucket list.

  3. Posted January 9, 2018 at 9:41 am | Permalink

    Love the birds, bats, and squirrels. Not that the monkeys are bad, but I don’t really like monkeys.

  4. Posted January 9, 2018 at 10:02 am | Permalink

    Very good! Thank you for sharing.
    The bats are one of the mouse-tailed bats, and one can certainly see why.

  5. Heather Hastie
    Posted January 9, 2018 at 12:24 pm | Permalink

    Wonderful. Thank you. I especially love the grey monkeys – what a lovely colour!

  6. Frank Bath
    Posted January 9, 2018 at 12:30 pm | Permalink

    Excellent pictures.
    (Flocks of ring-necked parakeets can be seen all over London and the Home Counties in the UK. Noisy destructive blighters they are too.)

  7. Mark R.
    Posted January 9, 2018 at 12:43 pm | Permalink

    I sure wish the US had indigenous monkeys cruising around. What fun!

    These were great and interesting photos of beautiful India. Thanks!

    • rickflick
      Posted January 9, 2018 at 2:12 pm | Permalink

      In the US I’d be afraid of what the gun lobby might work out with Republicans to allow monkey carry.

  8. loren russell
    Posted January 9, 2018 at 5:24 pm | Permalink

    pretty sure I’ve seen that threat display on tv recently. Did you call the macaque a ‘dotard’ by any chance?

    • Posted January 9, 2018 at 6:40 pm | Permalink

      No, but with my camera, he might have taken me for a member of the dishonest media.

  9. Mark Joseph
    Posted January 9, 2018 at 7:34 pm | Permalink

    I sent the first picture of the rhesus monkeys to my immediate family with the subject line: The easiest picture ever to anthropomorphize

    Awesome pictures. Thanks!

  10. sarvesh raykar
    Posted January 10, 2018 at 8:23 am | Permalink

    I want to share some photos of birds from indian subcontinet. How can I send them?

    On Tue, Jan 9, 2018 at 7:31 PM, Why Evolution Is True wrote:

    > whyevolutionistrue posted: “Yesterday I put up part I of reader Joe > Dickinson’s wildlife photographs from India. Today we have part II, and > Joe’s notes are indented. This shows some of the urban wildlife that > abounds in India: Continuing with India, here are shots from diverse loca” >

    • Posted January 10, 2018 at 9:24 am | Permalink

      Just Google my name and university and my email will come up, or click on “research interests” at the uppper right of the site, which will take you to my faculty page that has the email address.


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