Tuesday: Hili dialogue

Good morning on a very cold Tuesday, December 12, 2017: the temperature in Chicago right now is 18° F  (-8° C). It’s National Cocoa Day, and I think I may make myself a warming mug of hot chocolate. It’s also Kanji Day in Japan, in which a Japanese character (a written one, not a person) will be chosen to symbolize the day.

I’m quite busy finishing up preparations and talks for India, so this may be today’s only post. Like Maru, I do my best.

On December 12, 1787, Pennsylvania became the second state to ratify the United States Constitution (you may remember that Delaware, the first, ratified it five days before). On this day in 1901, in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Guglielmo Marconi received the first transatlantic radio signal—the letter “S” in Morse Code.  Exactly a decade later, Delhi replaced Calcutta as the capital of India. On this day in 1941, Hitler “declared the imminent extinction of the Jews” at the Reich Chancellery. As usual, there were no official records of this, but Joseph Goebbels recorded Hitler’s declaration in his diary:

Bezüglich der Judenfrage ist der Führer entschlossen, reinen Tisch zu machen. Er hat den Juden prophezeit, daß, wenn sie noch einmal einen Weltkrieg herbeiführen würden, sie dabei ihre Vernichtung erleben würden. Das ist keine Phrase gewesen. Der Weltkrieg ist da, die Vernichtung des Judentums muß die notwendige Folge sein.

Regarding the Jewish Question, the Führer has decided to make a clean sweep. He prophesied to the Jews that, if they yet again brought about a world war, they would experience their own annihilation. That was not just a phrase. The world war is here, and the annihilation of the Jews must be the necessary consequence.

On December 12, 1963, Kenya gained independence from the UK, and in 1991 the Russian Federation became independent from the USSR. Finally, on a day that will live in infamy—December 12, 2000—the U.S—Supreme court released its decision in the case of Bush v. Gore. Voting along ideological lines, the court allowed Katherine Harris’s Florida vote certification to stand, making Bush the President.

Notables born on this day include Gustave Flaubert (1821), Edvard Munch (1863), Edward G. Robinson (1893), Frank Sinatra (1915), Buford Pusser (1915), Connie Francis (1938), Dionne Warwick (1940), Dickey Betts (1943), Jennifer Connelly (1970), and Mayim Bialik (1975).

In honor of Dionne Warwick’s birthday, here she is with Whitney Houston, singing the hit “That’s what friends are for,” written by Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager. Note that Bacharach is at the piano:

And in honor of Munch, here’s his drawing “Die Katze” (The Cat):

Those who died on this day include Robert Browning (1889), Tallulah Bankhead (1968), Mo Udall (1998), Joseph Heller (1999), and Ike Turner (2007).

Meanwhile in Dobrzyn, Hili is, as usual, kvetching about the paucity of noms:

Hili: Providence didn’t provide.
A: Oh, I’m sorry.
 In Polish:
Hili: Opatrzność nie zaopatrzyła.
Ja: O przepraszam.

Speaking of cats and providence, here’s a cartoon about cat religion from Rubes, by Leigh Rubin, sent by reader Diane G.:

Most of the tweets below were found by the ever reliable Matthew Cobb. Be sure to watch the video.

A fox noms Frosty’s nose:

Reader Charleen sent a d*g trying to annoy a sleeping cat. The d*g finally gets what he deserves.

23 Comments

  1. Dave
    Posted December 12, 2017 at 7:02 am | Permalink

    “On this day in 1935, Hitler “declared the imminent extinction of the Jews” at the Reich Chancellery. ”

    Is the date right? The world war was still a long way off in 1935. December 1939 perhaps?

    • Posted December 12, 2017 at 7:07 am | Permalink

      You’re right–it was 1941. I changed it, thanks.

      • nicky
        Posted December 12, 2017 at 10:19 am | Permalink

        Was that just before the Wannsee Conference?

        • Bob
          Posted December 13, 2017 at 5:45 am | Permalink

          Yes. The Wannsee conference was January 1942.

  2. George
    Posted December 12, 2017 at 7:11 am | Permalink

    The kanji character for 2017 is 北 – kita which means north. It is not just for the day but selected to reflect the events of the year. Driving kita to the win were North Korea’s missile tests and nuclear test, the heavy rain in northern Kyushu, and the poor harvest of potatoes in Hokkaido.

    In 2016 it was gold.

  3. Posted December 12, 2017 at 7:23 am | Permalink

    “and I think I may make myself a warming mug of hot chocolate.”

    error?

    On Tue, Dec 12, 2017 at 4:31 AM Why Evolution Is True wrote:

    > whyevolutionistrue posted: “Good morning on a very cold Tuesday, December > 12, 2017: the temperature in Chicago right now is 18° F (-8° C). It’s > National Cocoa Day, and I think I may make myself a warming mug of hot > chocolate. It’s also Kanji Day in Japan, in which a Japanese charac” >

  4. Randall Schenck
    Posted December 12, 2017 at 7:31 am | Permalink

    1787 & 1788 were the ratification years for the constitution and this time period does not get much play in history although it was the most important and interesting part of the story. Each state had to conduct a convention just for the purpose of debating and deciding if this document should produce a government. Some states got right to it, such as Delaware and Pennsylvania. Others were slow and generally they were the states that were in doubt. The sequence was of some importance and the goal was to reach 9 states to ratify the document. After the number 9 was reached the goal became not to get left out. Rhode Island, who did not even send delegates to the constitutional convention decided very late to join the Union.

  5. DrBrydon
    Posted December 12, 2017 at 7:33 am | Permalink

    And now cows can get scritches!!

    • Blue
      Posted December 12, 2017 at 8:01 am | Permalink

      Thank you, DrBrydon, for my new word !

      I had not known of ‘scritch’ before
      and just now in re it … … studied up !

      Blue

    • Randall Schenck
      Posted December 12, 2017 at 8:04 am | Permalink

      I would guess they might add some insect repellent to this device as well. Helps keep the face flies off the cows. Out in the field/pasture they would hang a chain between two posts and wrap gunny sacks around the chain. Then add the repellent.

  6. Blue
    Posted December 12, 2017 at 7:49 am | Permalink

    Smashing one, Ms Diane G !

    I seem to know a passel of beings .human.
    who believe upon their last word and breath
    the same fairy tale ! As a matter of fact,
    one upon her dying dais ( literally ) asked
    me to recite for her thus of Tennyson’s to
    which I, o’course, complied:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crossing_the_Bar

    I have long wondered at, rather than yearning for another ‘place’ over where to cross, how
    difficult can it be .to know. one ‘d better
    like at where one is .now. … … .now. with
    breath !

    Blue

  7. W.Benson
    Posted December 12, 2017 at 8:11 am | Permalink

    With respect to Hitler’s vow to exterminate the Jews, it is eerie that the date, December 12, is one day after Nazi Germany unilaterally declared war on the US. Do Goebbels or other Nazi officials ever tie the two things together?

    • Randall Schenck
      Posted December 12, 2017 at 8:30 am | Permalink

      Do not know about that but the declaration of war on the U.S. was more or less required after the Pearl Harbor event. Partners in crime as it were.

    • Posted December 12, 2017 at 2:27 pm | Permalink

      Apparently Hitler did. Note the reference to world war in Goebbel’s diary. After Pearl Harbor and Hitler’s declaration, what was mainly a European conflict became a full-scale world war.

      • Posted December 13, 2017 at 11:26 am | Permalink

        Us Canadians – not to mention the Vietnamese and Koreans – might have a problem with that “European” characterization. 😉

  8. Richard Jones
    Posted December 12, 2017 at 9:16 am | Permalink

    Presumably that Munch drawing is of Salome after her dance, with the head of John the Baptist. Those cats want to see everything!

  9. Derek Freyberg
    Posted December 12, 2017 at 9:46 am | Permalink

    And Happy Cow (happycow.net) is also a website dedicated to reviews of vegan and vegetarian restaurants and stores.

  10. nicky
    Posted December 12, 2017 at 10:32 am | Permalink

    I remember that SCOTUS decision in 2000. SCOTUS lost all credibility as a non-partisan, independent judiciary body that day. Quadruple shame on them!
    We’re still living with the consequences of that unconscionable decision. The situation in Iraq being but the tip of the ice-berg. How different would our world have looked if Mr Gore would have been the (rightful) POTUS then, instead of the usurper Dubaya?

  11. gravelinspector-Aidan
    Posted December 12, 2017 at 11:31 am | Permalink

    Joseph Heller (1999)

    Caught 23?

    The d*g finally gets what he deserves.

    Fido is extremely lucky to get a one-paw education, not all four plus teeth.

  12. Posted December 13, 2017 at 11:27 am | Permalink

    So, why are cats supposedly the possessor of *nine* lives, rather than eight, ten, seventeen or three hundred and six?

    • Michael Fisher
      Posted December 13, 2017 at 8:55 pm | Permalink

      According to moggies.co.uk:

      The cat was once revered in Egypt, and this is probably where its nine lives began. The priesthood in On – known to the Greeks as Heliopolis and now a suburb of Cairo – worshipped Atum-Ra, a sun god who gave life to the gods of air, moisture, earth and sky, who, in turn, produced Osiris, Isis, Seth and Nephthys. These gods are collectively known as the Ennead, or the Nine

      HERE’S A WIKI ON THE NINE

      This could all be wild fancy of course


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