Wednesday: Hili dialogue

It’s Wednesday, October 25, 2017, the 298th day of the year, and I’m heading back to Chicago this morning. In all probability, I’ll be cooling my heels at Logan Airport when you read this. So it’s time for another poll!

Posting will be light today as I’ll be traveling, so bear with me until tomorrow late morning.

It’s National Greasy Food Day, so go have a burger and fries in the meantime.

On this day in 1415, according to Wikipedia, “Henry V of England and his lightly armoured infantry and archers defeat the heavily armoured French cavalry in the Battle of Agincourt on Saint Crispin’s Day.” In 1940,  Benjamin O. Davis, Sr. became the first African American general in the U.S. Army.  And on October 25, 1971, the United Nations expelled the Republic of China (Taiwan) and seated the People’s Republic of China as the official delegation from China.

Notables born on this day include Johann Strauss II (1825), Georges Bizet (1838), Pablo Picasso (1881), Minnie Pearl (1912), Anne Tyler (1941) and James Carville (1944). Here’s a nice Picasso featuring a cat:

Cat Devouring a Bird (1939), said to be an allegory of the Spanish Civil War

Those who died on October 25 include Bat Masterson (1921), Virgil Fox (1980), Mary McCarthy (1989) and Vincent Price (1993). Here’s a wonderful version of Fox playing Bach’s Fugue in G Major (“Gigue Fugue”):

Meanwhile in Dobrzyn, Hili is having an arcane talk with Andrzej. I asked for an interpretation, and Malgorzata said this:

Hili tries to get an additional portion of something delicious. She explains to Andrzej that if she is to follow Seneca the Younger’s idea about creating the past (she knows Andrzej is happy when she learns philosophy) she would need additional energy derived from an additional meal.
Here it is:
Hili: Seneca the Younger argued that we are creating the past.
A: And what about it?
Hili: It requires energy.
In Polish:
Hili: Seneka twierdził, że tworzymy przeszłość.
Ja: I co w związku z tym?
Hili: To wymaga energii.

Here’s a tw**t showing an old Penguin book with a curious cover. The title is embossed over the black bars, but you can’t read it from this angle. From that alone you might be able to guess the book. Matthew, who found the tweet, gives two clues. The answer will be posted in the comments later this afternoon.

A) Its a retro cover so not modern
B) Synonymous with redaction/rewriting of history

And another tw**t sussed out by Matthew: a great example of crypsis (camouflage), an adaptation that Matthew and I much admire. Spot the grasshopper!

A cat tweet found by Heather Hastie (a metaphor for trying to organize atheists):

Also from Heather, a powerful statement from Michelle Obama, apparently made during the last Presidential campaign, about Trump’s attitude toward women. It’s even more relevant today:

 

EDIT: The answer to book quiz above is, of course, ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ by George Orwell. In fact, the title is embossed in the black redacted patches, so if you turn the book to the light you can just make it out. Still a neat piece of marketing!

 

40 Comments

  1. David Harper
    Posted October 25, 2017 at 6:38 am | Permalink

    From Clue B, I’m guessing that the Penguin book is Orwell’s “1984”.

    • Flamadiddle
      Posted October 25, 2017 at 7:06 am | Permalink

      Agree.

    • Posted October 25, 2017 at 7:50 am | Permalink

      + another

    • Posted October 25, 2017 at 10:20 am | Permalink

      Correct!

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted October 25, 2017 at 9:45 pm | Permalink

      That came down the tubes to me too, before I scrolled to the reveal.
      By “redacting” are we seeing a linguistic move from the general usage in Europe (Germanic-family languages in particular) of being an editor (choosing stories, assigning resources like journalists, photographers etc) to specifically being the process of putting a black pen through things you don’t want people to read in documents that you are compelled to release.

  2. Ken Kukec
    Posted October 25, 2017 at 6:53 am | Permalink

    … the Battle of Agincourt on Saint Crispin’s Day.

    The speech William Shakespeare puts in the King’s mouth in Henry V, given just before the battle commences, is the source of the famous line “we few, we happy few, we band of brothers.”

  3. Randall Schenck
    Posted October 25, 2017 at 7:05 am | Permalink

    A great speech by Michelle a year ago. Maybe they start listening yesterday? Even the psychological professionals no longer stay silent because they have the duty to warn.

    • Richard Jones
      Posted October 25, 2017 at 8:22 am | Permalink

      Your next president?

      • Randall Schenck
        Posted October 25, 2017 at 8:26 am | Permalink

        Excellent choice. After the republicans destroy themselves, who knows.

        • Richard Bond
          Posted October 25, 2017 at 9:17 am | Permalink

          I would love to see her as president; unfortunately she has categorically denied the possibility. How about Elizabeth Warren or Sally Yates instead?

        • BJ
          Posted October 25, 2017 at 10:13 am | Permalink

          I’m so sick of dynasty families for President. It’s one of the reasons I didn’t want Hillary to get the nomination. If we want a woman for President, Warren is a much better idea (though I’m not convinced she’s viable in a general election).

  4. busterggi
    Posted October 25, 2017 at 7:27 am | Permalink

    Where is Rowdy Yates when he’s needed?

  5. Posted October 25, 2017 at 7:50 am | Permalink

    That Bach piece, wow! The switching between manuals is impressive.

    • Taskin
      Posted October 25, 2017 at 9:01 am | Permalink

      The foot work too, wow!

      • Posted October 25, 2017 at 9:58 am | Permalink

        This video really lets you see the foot work.

        • Taskin
          Posted October 25, 2017 at 11:04 am | Permalink

          That’s so impressive, his feet float over the pedals! What a fantastic organ that is. I play piano and harpsichord but have occasionally substituted for church organist friends. My brain obviously does not extend to my feet.

          • Posted October 25, 2017 at 2:41 pm | Permalink

            A contemporary reviewer described Bach’s technique, writing: “His feet flew over the pedal-board as if winged…”

            • Taskin
              Posted October 25, 2017 at 9:08 pm | Permalink

              Cool!

    • David Harper
      Posted October 25, 2017 at 9:09 am | Permalink

      As Peter Gammond wrote in “A Bluffer’s Guide to Music”:

      Do not mess with organists. They are a race apart and their music is not of this world.

    • Gregory Kusnick
      Posted October 25, 2017 at 10:20 am | Permalink

      Here’s a wonderful version of Fox playing Bach’s Fugue in G Major

      I suppose one has to be the most wonderful version of oneself to play something like this.

  6. Posted October 25, 2017 at 7:51 am | Permalink

    Let us call them atheist kittens because their eyes are open.

    • barn owl
      Posted October 25, 2017 at 9:29 am | Permalink

      +1

      And those are some of the cutest kittens, atheist or not, I’ve ever seen.

  7. Posted October 25, 2017 at 7:55 am | Permalink

    I love this part: “The men in my life don’t talk about women like this.” And, “… strong men don’t need to put down women to make themselves feel powerful.”

    So true.

    Well said Michelle Obama.

    • Ken Kukec
      Posted October 25, 2017 at 8:33 am | Permalink

      That’s likely one speech Michelle would gladly let Melania plagiarize.

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted October 25, 2017 at 9:48 pm | Permalink

        Trump would slap her down if she tried it.

  8. MKray
    Posted October 25, 2017 at 8:15 am | Permalink

    Little cats should be seen but not herded!

    • David Coxill
      Posted October 25, 2017 at 2:55 pm | Permalink

      HAHA ,what is the matter with the white one at the far right ,it seems to have trouble with its back legs not getting a grip on the wooden floor .

  9. colnago80
    Posted October 25, 2017 at 8:29 am | Permalink

    Here’s a recording of Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D minor by Fox.

  10. DrBrydon
    Posted October 25, 2017 at 8:44 am | Permalink

    Bizet has his day?

  11. Liz
    Posted October 25, 2017 at 8:47 am | Permalink

    I voted no last time but yes this time. Hopefully not, though. I like this one by Picasso. I also like Violin and Grapes.

  12. Posted October 25, 2017 at 10:06 am | Permalink

    As for Penguin book – Darkness at Noon by Arthur Koestler. First published (I believe) in 1941 and an expose of the duplicity of the Soviet Union.

  13. BJ
    Posted October 25, 2017 at 10:08 am | Permalink

    The second I saw the cover I knew exactly which book it was. It just made sense. And clue B makes things way too easy.

  14. Gregory Kusnick
    Posted October 25, 2017 at 10:21 am | Permalink

    More evidence for your theory that artists can’t draw cats?

  15. Jenny Haniver
    Posted October 25, 2017 at 10:32 am | Permalink

    Just noted this a.m. that Fats Domino died yesterday.

    • Paul S
      Posted October 25, 2017 at 11:09 am | Permalink

      My playlist hit Blueberry Hill and I Want to Walk You Home earlier this morning.

      • Jenny Haniver
        Posted October 25, 2017 at 12:03 pm | Permalink

        Yeah. Perfect.

  16. Byron Morris
    Posted October 25, 2017 at 11:58 am | Permalink

    I was sure the book title was The Thin Red Line

  17. Posted October 25, 2017 at 12:07 pm | Permalink

    I think Jerry forgot to mention a very significant event: it was 100 years ago today that the Bolshevik’s stormed the Winter Palace in Petrograd marking the Marxist takeover of the Russian government. Now I’m not much for celebrating Marxism but this event changed the world, whether you like it or not!

  18. infiniteimprobabilit
    Posted October 25, 2017 at 11:11 pm | Permalink

    “Here’s a nice Picasso featuring a cat:”

    … and somebody said Henri Rousseau’s cats were unrealistic. Ummm.

    cr


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