Readers’ wildlife photos

Reader Don Bredes has a neighborhood moose, and he kindly sent photos and some notes (indented):

Our neighborly moose (Alces alces), whose tracks we’ve been taking note of this fall, wandered through the freshly tilled garden this morning, helping herself to the remaining chard and the Brussels Sprouts leaves by the evidence. My wife and I did not notice her until she’d reached the edge of our field. I went out to wish her a good day–and a good day it is–and managed to approach within 15 yards. That was as close as I dared. She’s bigger than she may appear here and healthy-looking. I spoke to her. More curious than perturbed, she didn’t budge but returned her attentions to her breakfast. A moose has nothing to be afraid of.

 

54 Comments

  1. GBJames
    Posted October 20, 2017 at 10:08 am | Permalink

    Where in the world, Mr. Bredes, does your moose reside?

    • Posted October 20, 2017 at 10:16 am | Permalink

      We live in the town of South Wheelock in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom, on a wooded hill at the end of a dirt road about a quarter mile from the nearest house to the south and a mile in the other directions. We do have a number of moose hereabouts (and bear, too), and we see them fairly often, though the population is under threat as a consequence of recent benign winters that have encouraged an upsurge in voracious ticks. The ticks are especially harmful to weakened animals in late winter and spring, particularly the newborn.

      Vermont Fish & Wildlife has reduced the number of permits issued to hunters from 165 last year to 80. Some have called for a complete abeyance, but the agency believes the culling is beneficial.

      • GBJames
        Posted October 20, 2017 at 10:22 am | Permalink

        Ah. My daughter lives in Maine and I hear that ticks are a serious problem in the area.

      • Posted October 20, 2017 at 1:46 pm | Permalink

        Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom, on a wooded hill at the end of a dirt road about a quarter mile from the nearest house to the south and a mile in the other directions

        Sounds like a slice of heaven! 🙂

        • Posted October 20, 2017 at 4:54 pm | Permalink

          It is, it really is. I bought the land in 1974 with the small advance I received for my first novel, never imagining that I’d be able to build any time soon, if ever. But the novel did very well, and I was able to put up a tidy house, which I doubled in size when I married 10 years later. I’ve been here ever since. Peaceful, spacious, and lovely, with long views out toward the White Mountains of New Hampshire across the Connecticut valley. The challenge, sometimes, is the long driveway. Our plowing bill is considerable some years.

          • Stephen Barnard
            Posted October 20, 2017 at 5:09 pm | Permalink

            I looked up your ouerve. Impressive. Writing an effective, successful novel is something I look on as close to magic.

            • Posted October 20, 2017 at 8:09 pm | Permalink

              What’s magic is actually making a living at it, even when you publish. It’s next to impossible.

      • Posted October 20, 2017 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

        You’re a neighbor of my sister (who lives in your town) and a farther neighbor of mine. I’m glad to see she is healthy. Our moose haven’t been seen for awhile (altho the Barton road crew has told me there is a huge male here in my woods). So hi!

        • Posted October 20, 2017 at 4:55 pm | Permalink

          How intriguing, Andree. Who would that be? You can message me through FB or through my personal website, if you like.

  2. Stephen Barnard
    Posted October 20, 2017 at 10:30 am | Permalink

    When the bristly hair on the shoulder becomes erect and the ears go back, as in the photos, keep your distance. It’s rutting season, so be especially careful with a bull.

    The moose around here tend to move in small family groups. Cows keep their calves around for quite a long time, and when twin calves move on they hang out together. Even bulls sometimes hang out together. I’ve seen as many as five in one group.

    That looks like a yearling to me.

    • Posted October 20, 2017 at 11:07 am | Permalink

      Yes, I think you’re right–a yearling and a half, maybe, nearly full grown, though with some bulk yet to gain through the hindquarters. Good luster to her coat. I would never try to approach a bull, of course. We’ve seen a bull more than once when we’ve been out x-c skiing. We take care to turn in the opposite direction.

      • Posted October 20, 2017 at 1:49 pm | Permalink

        Indeed, I’ve encountered them (bulls) each time I’ve canoed in Minnesota’s BWCA.

        Oh yeah! We keep our distance. The last time was in late September (dang, it was cold! – but the benefit was NO BUGS). Man those bulls we pissed off just seeing us on the other side of a lake! And they let you know it!

        I’ve seen wolves in the BWCA too – in winter.

      • Posted October 20, 2017 at 1:50 pm | Permalink

        And thanks very much sharing the photos!

  3. Merilee
    Posted October 20, 2017 at 10:31 am | Permalink

    Lovely photos, Don!

  4. Damien McLeod
    Posted October 20, 2017 at 10:38 am | Permalink

    Beautiful.

  5. yazikus
    Posted October 20, 2017 at 10:42 am | Permalink

    One of my favorite park notice signs reads:
    Unlike with bear, it is safe to run from moose.

  6. Posted October 20, 2017 at 10:46 am | Permalink

    Thank you for sharing your visitor with us, Don. She’s gorgeous.

  7. J Cook
    Posted October 20, 2017 at 10:55 am | Permalink

    Greetings Don,
    By chance is she a juvenal?
    JC

    • Posted October 20, 2017 at 11:08 am | Permalink

      Nearly full grown, I think, possibly born in the spring of ’16. Husky through the shoulders but with more bulk to gain in the hindquarters.

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted October 21, 2017 at 9:25 am | Permalink

      is she a juvenal?

      That depends on how good her Latin is?

  8. Debbie Coplan
    Posted October 20, 2017 at 11:05 am | Permalink

    What a wonderful neighbor to have. Someone you don’t hide from-

  9. Posted October 20, 2017 at 11:11 am | Permalink

    They do come quite close to the house sometimes. Once late in the winter a big bull strolled right up to our big living room windows. I wasn’t home at the time, but my wife was. She was loading the stove. She sank to the floor in amazement. Our daughter was was here, too. She was about two and a half. When I came home, she ran up to me and said, “Daddy! Daddy! I saw a moose! With WINGS!”

  10. Stephen Barnard
    Posted October 20, 2017 at 11:23 am | Permalink

    I recall canoeing down Silver Creek in Idaho with PCC a couple of summers ago, when we encountered a moose browsing in the creek. (Or was it two moose? I don’t remember. I think Jerry took photos.) It was a little tense getting past.

    When I have visitors the first thing they want to see is a moose, and the moose are strangely cooperative about showing up. I might not see one for week, then I have a visitor and BOOM! MOOSE! Yesterday a DirecTV technician showed up to fix a problem. As he walked in, my d*gs alerted us to two moose across the creek. The tech loved it.

    • Posted October 20, 2017 at 1:51 pm | Permalink

      You live in a slice of heaven too! 🙂

    • Posted October 20, 2017 at 3:55 pm | Permalink

      It was one female moose, but it was big and we were only about ten feet away. It was stunning, and the first moose I ever saw in the flesh and in the wild.

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted October 21, 2017 at 9:33 am | Permalink

        Next time you’re passing through The Northlands (Norway for sure, probably Sweden and Finland too), nose through the delicatessen counter to see what bits of moose offal they have in there. Some Noggins I worked with once had an emergency shipment of moose heart arrive on the same flight as their Cloggy colleagues had Stroopwaffels land. Very strong and gamey flavour.
        (This assumes that the Noggins weren’t being ripped off by a butcher re-selling reindeer heart as moose. They’re butchers, so you wouldn’t expect less.)
        (Odds of PCC not nosing through the deli counter already – negligible.)

        • Merilee
          Posted October 22, 2017 at 8:46 am | Permalink

          Noggin and Cloggy??

          • gravelinspector-Aidan
            Posted October 22, 2017 at 9:45 am | Permalink

            “Noggin” in reference to the children’s TV cartoons telling the tales of Noggin the Nog and his nemesis Nogbad the Bad ; you have to be British of a certain vintage to remember the cartoons, but in industries where you deal with a lot of Norwegians, the nickname is widespread.
            “Cloggy” for the footwear. Same comment, but for the Dutch.

    • Hempenstein
      Posted October 20, 2017 at 9:01 pm | Permalink

      That must be a trans-continental characteristic of the genus. When I lived in Stockholm, our apartment was directly across from one of the main entryways to a huge fresh-air preserve (Nacka friluftsreservat, for any authentic Swedes). I was out there with a colleague who was visiting from New Zealand, and she asked if I ever saw älg (they translate to elk, but they look like moose) out there. “Oh, no, it’s too close to the city,” I said (downtown Stockholm is indeed quite close). Then we looked up and there stood an älg!

  11. Mark R.
    Posted October 20, 2017 at 12:19 pm | Permalink

    Beautiful moose… Supposedly there are some around where I live, but I’ve never seen one. I have seen a bear and a number of bobcats though.

  12. Posted October 20, 2017 at 12:49 pm | Permalink

    Very interesting! Thank you. I have never been that close to a wild moose, although i had seen a few.

    • Paul S
      Posted October 20, 2017 at 1:05 pm | Permalink

      I’ve seen many bear, elk and big horn sheep in the wild traveling though the Dakotas and Wyoming. Invariably, my belief of how close they were didn’t match reality.
      A bear at 150ft seems like 20ft 🙂

      • Posted October 20, 2017 at 1:54 pm | Permalink

        This was taken through the driver’s window of my car with a normal lens. Badlands NP in South Dakota. He was a little wary and showed me his horns a few times; but mainly he walk calmly down the edge of the road.

        We were in the park before dawn …

        • Paul S
          Posted October 20, 2017 at 2:22 pm | Permalink

          Beautiful picture. They don’t seem fussed with visitors, but I’ve seen them stare down a few people who’d gotten out of their car. Despite signs to stay in your car, someone always gets out to take a picture.
          I wouldn’t want a head butt from those horns.

        • Posted October 20, 2017 at 5:00 pm | Permalink

          How do you post a photo in the comments, I wonder.

          • infiniteimprobabilit
            Posted October 21, 2017 at 7:01 am | Permalink

            One way is, you just copy and paste the link to the site where the photo is hosted, exactly as it appears in your browser address bar.

            Like this for example:
            “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Moose_superiorxxxxx.jpg”

            (I’ve deliberately corrupted the link by adding x’s and putting it in quotes so it won’t imbed).

            cr

  13. claudia baker
    Posted October 20, 2017 at 2:18 pm | Permalink

    Great pictures and background story. You do, indeed, live in a little slice of heaven!

    We have had an upsurge of voracious ticks here too, in Eastern Ontario. I hate to use the flea & tick stuff on my cat, who is used to going outdoors all the time. But if I don’t, he’s got at least one tick on him every time he comes inside. I’ve gone from being very squeamish to quite blasé about getting them off of him. I am thinking of getting a kitten, and this new kitty will be an indoor cat, strictly because of the ticks. They’re horrible! Just another one of the many dire consequences of global warming.

  14. Posted October 20, 2017 at 3:56 pm | Permalink

    It was one female moose, but it was big and we were only about ten feet away. It was stunning, and the first moose I ever saw in the flesh and in the wild.

    • Posted October 20, 2017 at 8:51 pm | Permalink

      They are such remarkable animals to see up close, almost dinosaur-like in their odd proportions and sheer size.

  15. Posted October 20, 2017 at 5:45 pm | Permalink

    There is a moose in the garden!
    that’s a statement i will never make, let alone chat with..
    Thanks, sounds like a landscape photo would have been in order, no complaining though.

    • Posted October 20, 2017 at 6:43 pm | Permalink

      I have a landscape photo for you, and I would post it here if I knew how.

      • Heather Hastie
        Posted October 21, 2017 at 5:51 am | Permalink

        I think you have to be on one of those photo-sharing sites. Pinterest might work too. I’ve never been able to work it out either so I share from Facebook or Twitter, but only if I have a really, really good reason because it’s against Da Roolz and I don’t want to push my luck. I suspect Jerry would let you off on this occasion though!

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted October 21, 2017 at 7:07 am | Permalink

        Upload it to a suitable Internet site, then paste the link to it in your comment. Like “Http://Somesite/Contributions/Mycoolphoto.jpg” (but without the quote marks). If it ends in .jpg then WordPress will imbed the photo.

        So far as I know, PCC doesn’t object to imbedded photos, but he doesn’t like imbedded videos, because bandwidth. (I stand to be corrected there).

        cr

        • infiniteimprobabilit
          Posted October 21, 2017 at 7:26 am | Permalink

          P.S. Don – did you say you had your own personal site? That would work, just put the photo somewhere on your site and link to it.

          cr

        • GBJames
          Posted October 21, 2017 at 8:43 am | Permalink

          It isn’t really bandwidth that is involved, at least not computer/network bandwidth. When you insert a link into a WordPress comment the video file itself ends up at the site, just the link. Your browser will display the video by pulling it from wherever it is actually stored, typically up on some YouTube server.

          I believe PCC[E] is more concerned with visual clutter on the page if there are a lot of videos in comments. I suppose you could consider this a psychological bandwidth issue.

          • infiniteimprobabilit
            Posted October 21, 2017 at 5:25 pm | Permalink

            Could be. I just checked da Roolz (after I commented, natch) and he says nothing about photos, only videos.

            cr

            P.S. You said “the video file itself ends up at the site,” – I think from the context you meant “doesn’t” ?

            • GBJames
              Posted October 22, 2017 at 8:06 am | Permalink

              You are correct. The “doesn’t” somehow evaporated.

      • Posted October 21, 2017 at 5:02 pm | Permalink

        Hey thanks for the thought, it sounded like a great spot where you live, down a dirt road, over the slight incline, past the moose…

  16. Posted October 21, 2017 at 2:15 am | Permalink

    Meese pics! I love meese.

  17. Posted October 22, 2017 at 9:13 am | Permalink

    OK, let me try a Landscape with Moose. The photo is one in a series of landscapes looking toward the southeast, across the Connecticut River valley toward the White Mountains of New Hampshire, from our deck.

  18. Posted December 11, 2017 at 5:29 am | Permalink

    We saw lots of moose in Jackson Hole, the traffic came to a standstill as everyone got out of their cars to take photos. We even saw one on the piste. We were going up in a gondola and saw one on the piste, we were safe, but I bet it gave some skiers one hell of a shock!


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