Frankenpumpkin

Shopping at the local produce store, I saw that they were selling “Frankenstein pumpkins,” which I presume they make by forcing a growing pumpkin into some kind of mold that has a Frankenstein monster face.

Now a regular pumpkin with no face costs just a few dollars. What do you suppose they are charging for this one?

I suppose people are getting too lazy to carve pumpkins these days.

 

39 Comments

  1. YF
    Posted October 1, 2017 at 4:18 pm | Permalink

    Soon they’ll come up with a “Trumpkin”!

    • Ken Kukec
      Posted October 1, 2017 at 4:39 pm | Permalink

      They’re already the right color.

      • Diane G.
        Posted October 2, 2017 at 4:03 am | Permalink

        😀

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted October 1, 2017 at 8:00 pm | Permalink

      Dammit, first thing that occurred to me, and the first comment beat me to it! 😉

      cr

      • Posted October 2, 2017 at 6:46 am | Permalink

        Actually Trumpkin was a CS Lewis character – a dwarf in his Narnia stories
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trumpkin

        • infiniteimprobabilit
          Posted October 2, 2017 at 8:38 pm | Permalink

          Hmm…

          “Trumpkin is an intensely practical and skeptical dwarf”

          So, not a lot in common with the Orange One, then 😉

          cr

  2. BJ
    Posted October 1, 2017 at 4:26 pm | Permalink

    “Now a regular pumpkin with no face costs just a few dollars. What do you suppose they are charging for this one?”

    They’ll be able to get thousands once somebody decides that’s the face of Jesus or the Virgin Mary.

    • Brian Salkas
      Posted October 1, 2017 at 5:23 pm | Permalink

      could be virggin mary. that face would explain why she was a virgin (ziiing)

      • BJ
        Posted October 1, 2017 at 5:31 pm | Permalink

        OH SNAP

      • Ken Kukec
        Posted October 1, 2017 at 10:23 pm | Permalink

        Comely enough for the archangel Gabriel and his Iron-Age turkey-baster …

  3. eric
    Posted October 1, 2017 at 5:04 pm | Permalink

    If they sold the mold for $5-10, I’d buy one for my parents. Can I get it in Darth Vader? Wicked Witch? Those would be totally cool! I could see a whole cottage industry in different face molds. While I’d still carve a pumpkin with my kid for the experience, I’d be very happy to substitute 1 ‘faced’ pumpkin + 1 carved one for our current 2 carved one tradition.

  4. FB
    Posted October 1, 2017 at 5:12 pm | Permalink

    Dr. Coyne, this is not related to your post but I don’t know your email.

    http://www.latintimes.com/pope-francis-viral-video-why-pontiff-said-devil-punishes-mexico-video-424387

    The pope says in the second video (1 min long) that Mexicans have the privilege of being chastised with earthquakes by the devil, who is doing that because is really angry at the Virgen de Guadalupe.

    The interview is from january 2017.

  5. Ken Kukec
    Posted October 1, 2017 at 5:18 pm | Permalink

    What do you suppose they are charging for this one?

    If I’m recalling Mary Shelley’s novel correctly, Dr. Frankenstein obtained his materials gratis from charnel houses and gravesites. Why should pumpkin buyers pay more?

    • Liz
      Posted October 1, 2017 at 5:41 pm | Permalink

      Maybe $32.

  6. Brian Salkas
    Posted October 1, 2017 at 5:20 pm | Permalink

    looks like some classic batesian mimicry. the pumpkin has evolved to grow in the shape of a well-known monster. the pumkins with less threatening features were selected against for thousands of years

    • Rita
      Posted October 1, 2017 at 5:36 pm | Permalink

      Next year you can buy his son, Lamarck.

      • Rita
        Posted October 1, 2017 at 5:37 pm | Permalink

        “Lamarck” (That’s the son, not you).

  7. Diana MacPherson
    Posted October 1, 2017 at 5:37 pm | Permalink

    Stopping myself from correcting the store and telling them Frankstein was the scientist and the nameless monster was his creation. Damn Hollywood.

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted October 1, 2017 at 5:38 pm | Permalink

      Frankenstein. LOL Frank Stein is probably some dude that shops there on Saturday mornings.

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted October 1, 2017 at 8:07 pm | Permalink

        That is the most common misconception of all literary allusions, I think. (i.e. that Frankenstein was the monster). Caused in part by the fact that the monster was nameless, and in many constructions ‘Frankenstein’s monster’ sounds really clumsy.

        For example ‘Frankenstein’s monster pumpkins’ has two different meanings.

        So the mistake (or possibly deliberate error) is excusable.

        cr

    • cnocspeireag
      Posted October 2, 2017 at 3:56 am | Permalink

      I seem to remember that the monster wasn’t nameless, but referred to itself as ‘Adam’. This might have been a figurative allusion though.

    • Bob Barber
      Posted October 2, 2017 at 7:58 am | Permalink

      This from Wikipedia.

      Mary Shelley’s original novel never ascribes an actual name to the monster; although when speaking to his creator, Victor Frankenstein, the monster does say “I ought to be thy Adam” (in reference to the first man created in the Bible). Victor refers to his creation as “creature”, “fiend”, “spectre”, “the demon”, “wretch”, “devil”, “thing”, “being”, and “ogre”.[3]

      It has become common vernacular to refer to the creature by the name “Frankenstein” or “The Monster” but neither of these names are apparent in the book.[

  8. Posted October 1, 2017 at 6:09 pm | Permalink

    This is something that was done many decades ago (saw old film footage on it). But it never caught on.

    One of the best pumpkin carvings that I had seen that was also very simple was a set of pumpkins with narrow slit eyes and mouths. They were then ‘sewn’ shut with a leather cord. *Shiver*.

  9. Posted October 1, 2017 at 6:23 pm | Permalink

    You have to grow it like that! Actually More difficult! But really cool! 🎃

  10. challedon
    Posted October 1, 2017 at 7:25 pm | Permalink

    That pumpkin definitely looks Abby Normal.

  11. Simon Hayward
    Posted October 1, 2017 at 7:55 pm | Permalink

    Wow, there is a whole industry out there, you can buy buddha molds for pears too, star and heart molds for cucumbers – if you want that cross section and also underwear for peaches – presumably designed by someone who watched the relevant House of Cards episode.

    The molds for Frankenstein are about $40 no idea how much the pumpkin is though

  12. Posted October 1, 2017 at 8:33 pm | Permalink

    Such heartless cruelty to fruits and vegetables is why I’ve chosen to be a carnivore.

    • JohnnieCanuck
      Posted October 1, 2017 at 10:22 pm | Permalink

      Not that the more traditional carving method isn’t cruel. The pumpkin cells are alive while all the vivisection and disemboweling is going on.

      I like to tease my vegetarian friends that those raw carrots they’ve eaten were alive and would have grown if they had put them in some soil.

  13. LB
    Posted October 1, 2017 at 9:54 pm | Permalink

    I saw an article about this–the grower made molds and forced the pumpkins into them. He charged distributors $75 for each one. No telling how much it would cost to buy one–probably twice that. Here’s a link to the article. https://www.cnbc.com/2015/10/09/pumpkins-shaped-like-peoples-heads-a-dream-comes-true.html

  14. Posted October 2, 2017 at 1:20 am | Permalink

    This pumpkin is modelled on Herman Munster, 5th Earl of Shroudshire,
    all round good guy, fond childhood memories of the b & w tv era.

  15. Posted October 2, 2017 at 2:51 am | Permalink

    It resembles the Green Man in a way, an old motif in European culture, because of the combination of face plus vegetable or plant. In an odd way, it fits Halloween, which is also a pagan/celtic tradition embedded into Christian culture.

  16. Harrison
    Posted October 2, 2017 at 4:22 am | Permalink

    There’s a big benefit to this sort of pumpkin. You can buy one now and have it sitting out for the rest of the month whereas you’d be wise to wait to carve your jack-o-lantern just a few days before Halloween to avoid it rotting too soon.

    • Jonathan Wallace
      Posted October 2, 2017 at 5:51 am | Permalink

      I am not really sure that that is a benefit. It seems to me that – for mainly commercial reasons – most of the big annual feasts and festivals extend over much too long a period. By the time we actually get to Christmas, for example, we have been enduring weeks of cheesy ‘festive’ music in the shops, garish illuminations and such like. Does anyone really find this enhances their enjoyment of the holiday? Let’s keep ’em short and sweet.

  17. Posted October 2, 2017 at 8:06 am | Permalink

    The answer: the pumpkin cost $49. Needless to say, I didn’t get one.

    • Ron DeBry
      Posted October 2, 2017 at 8:42 am | Permalink

      I wouldn’t pay $49 for it either – but it is cool. Not sure you can call pumpkin carving a dying art, though. Between fancy patterns to download on the internet and Dremel selling specialized carving kits, there are some darn fancy jack-o-lanterns these days. Several years back we spent many days helping our then middle-school son carve a Death Star

    • Liz
      Posted October 2, 2017 at 9:07 am | Permalink

      $49 is a little much but I’m not surprised. Not a fan of this kind of pumpkin. I’d rather carve one.


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