President Macron’s cat connection

I pass this along for your delectation as a communication from Reader SJL:
I just came across a very odd little ‘ailuro-fact’ which may be of interest to you. (Failing that, it could at least prove useful as a Caturday filler item).
It appears that French President Emmanuel Macron’s father, Jean-Michel Macron [b. 1951], is an expert on feline sneezing.  See here and here.
The first link gives a list of Jean-Michel Macron’s papers on cats, with several on sneezing.  Here’s a classic:

This fact will make you the life of any party. (If that fails, ask people what one country in the world is named after a chemical element.)

Coincidentally, Macron the Elder’s papers are listed on this site:

And here’s the obligatory compilation of sneezing cats:

19 Comments

  1. John
    Posted July 13, 2017 at 2:32 pm | Permalink

    That made me sneeze.

    • Merilee
      Posted July 13, 2017 at 3:07 pm | Permalink

      Yawning cats often make me do the same.

  2. Posted July 13, 2017 at 2:43 pm | Permalink

    Argentina

  3. Gregory Kusnick
    Posted July 13, 2017 at 2:45 pm | Permalink

    You mean Argentina, of course, but Gold Coast was arguably a country (if not an independent nation), and was undoubtedly named for a chemical element.

    • cnocspeireag
      Posted July 14, 2017 at 6:37 am | Permalink

      Cyprus

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted July 14, 2017 at 10:42 am | Permalink

        If anything, copper was named for Cyprus, not the other way around.

        • Gregory Kusnick
          Posted July 14, 2017 at 11:14 am | Permalink

          Maybe. The Roman word for copper means “metal of Cyprus”, but it’s possible (says Wikipedia) that the Mycenaean name for Cyprus (from which the Roman word is derived) meant “land of copper”. Nobody knows for sure.

          What we do know is that copper metallurgy predates human habitation of Cyprus by several millennia, so the metal almost certainly had a name long before the island did.

        • Gregory Kusnick
          Posted July 14, 2017 at 11:18 am | Permalink

          On a side note, as I write this, I’m sitting about 20 miles from Copperopolis, California.

          • Posted July 14, 2017 at 12:41 pm | Permalink

            If one does it in reverse, there are lots of places which lent their name to elements, including that oddest of places, Ytterby, which has *4* named for it.

            • Colin McLachlan
              Posted July 15, 2017 at 3:31 am | Permalink

              Can you name the Scottish Highland village after which an element is named?

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted July 14, 2017 at 10:51 am | Permalink

      Gold Coast was arguably a country

      Six distinct colonies, including the British colony of “Gold Coast”, which is present-day Ghana. (Many of the other former colonies are provinces within Ghana.)
      I’m still trying to think o a better answer.

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted July 14, 2017 at 11:19 am | Permalink

        Nope, can’t think of a better example than Argentina, though I don’t particularly associate it with silver. That’s more Peru and Bolivia, IME.

        • Posted July 14, 2017 at 12:45 pm | Permalink

          I thought someone thought it was worth so naming the country *and* a city: La Plata. (I think this is right – don’t have my books on the elements at hand.)

  4. Michael Fisher
    Posted July 13, 2017 at 3:07 pm | Permalink

    Cats allergic to cat hair?

    • Randall Schenck
      Posted July 13, 2017 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

      Can you say Antihistamine.

      • Colin McLachlan
        Posted July 15, 2017 at 3:29 am | Permalink

        Yes, I can 🙂

  5. Randall Schenck
    Posted July 13, 2017 at 3:21 pm | Permalink

    Antihistamine

  6. Debbie Coplan
    Posted July 13, 2017 at 3:26 pm | Permalink

    Cat bless you!

  7. Posted July 13, 2017 at 5:22 pm | Permalink

    Listening to Radio NZ on my way home late last night i listened to an interview with an american scientist about ‘big troubles’ with cat gut microbes (dogs as well) and it’s a $4 billion plus problem in the US alone. Around 10% of cats are effected by it.
    It’s a messy problem and not easily pinned down and fixed as they can’t source it’s origin.
    Soil and external environment i think and unfortunately i cannot source a link (i tried) Sneezy at one end and runny at the other? changing the diet might not do it.


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