Monday: Hili dialogue

Good morning! We’re into another week, for it’s Monday, June 26, 2017: National Chocolate Pudding Day. I haven’t had any of that stuff for years. but i do like it. It’s also Ratcatcher’s Day in Hamelin, and you know what’s reputed to have happened there.

PCC(E) is tired today, having slept poorly due to a tummy ache (now gone) and Life in General, so don’t expect substantive postings today. On this day in 1483, Richard III became king of England. He was killed in battle two years later at the age of only 32, and, as documented on this site, his remains were discovered in 2012 under a Leicester car park and verified by physical examination and DNA tests; (see here and here). On July 26, 1917, the American Expeditionary Forces (the Yanks, or “doughboys) landed in France to fight the Germans; their first combat experience was to come four months later. And here’s a boxing match that I actually remember happening, though I can’t be sure I saw it on t.v.: on this day in 1959, Swedish boxer Ingemar Johansson became the world heavyweight champion, defeating American Floyd Patterson by a technical knockout in round three; the fight was held at Yankee Stadium. On this day in 1963, John F. Kennedy gave his “Ich bin ein Berliner” speech in support of West Germany after the Berlin Wall had been built. As someone who speaks a bit of Deutsch, I find his German pronunciation not so great, lacking any gutterals fir “ich”, which came out as “ish”. Nevertheless, the speech was a great one, as you can see from even this short excerpt (the whole 10-minute speech is here):

On this day in 2000, The Human Genome Project announced its completion of a “rough draft” DNA sequence; perhaps many of you will remember that. And on this day in 2013 and 2015, there were two landmarks for gay rights. In 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled, by a  5–4 vote in the case of United States v. Windsor, that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (prohibiting same-sex marriages for federal purposes) was unconstitutional because it violated the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution. And exactly two years later the Court ruled, by the same margin, that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marriage under the 14th Amendment (the “equal protection” Amendment) to the United States Constitution.

Notables born on this day include Pearl S. Buck (1892), Peter Lorre (1904), and Derek Jeter (1974). Those who died on this day include conquistador Francisco Pizarro (1541), Malcolm Lowry (1957), Roy Campanella (1993), Strom Thurmond (2003) and Nora Ephron (2012). Meanwhile in Dobrzyn, Hili is frustrated; as Malgorzata explained, “Hili cannot fly which she regards as an injustice and an invisible ceiling hampering her in her pursuit of her freedom.”

A: Are you looking at birds?
Hili: Yes, but I’m restricted by a glass ceiling.
In Polish:
Ja: Patrzysz na ptaszki?
Hili: Tak, ale ogranicza mnie szklany sufit.

From Winnipeg we have a photo of Gus in the setting sun:

Reader John sent a cartoon depicting a cat “snooze alarm” (Grania said it wouldn’t work):

And a picture of Hili drinking from a Hili mug I made on which you can see a picture of Hili drinking from another mug on which there’s a picture of Hili as a kitten. This is the famous “triple Hili” picture which I will put on another mug some day, possibly then achieving, with another photo, the Quadruple Hili Mug:

 

24 Comments

  1. Posted June 26, 2017 at 6:47 am | Permalink

    Infinite Hili regression!!!

    For German native speakers, wouldn’t ‘ik’ be closer to Berlin dialect?

    • stephen
      Posted June 26, 2017 at 6:56 am | Permalink

      Pedants’ Corner Alert! When living in Germany,I noticed that locus of the fricative sound usually written as “ch” seems to wander from the velum (soft palate) to the alveolum (teeth ridge) via the hard palate… I think this is because of regional speech variation,but am not certain.

    • James Walker
      Posted June 26, 2017 at 8:14 am | Permalink

      Yes, it’s generally ik in the north and isch in the south. In Standard German (Hochdeutsch) what’s spelled as ch is velar (Bach, schwach)) unless it’s next to i, in which case it’s more palatal (ich, weich).

  2. Ken Kukec
    Posted June 26, 2017 at 7:09 am | Permalink

    … here’s a boxing match that I actually remember happening, though I can’t be sure I saw it on t.v.: on this day in 1959, Swedish boxer Ingemar Johansson became the world\ heavyweight champion, defeating American Floyd Patterson …

    I have a vague recollection, as a little kid, of seeing both fighters on Jackie Gleason’s show before their rubber match in ’61, and of Gleason showing parts of their first two fights while interviewing them jointly — Johansson’s 1959 third-round TKO of Patterson, and Patterson’s fifth round knockout of Johansson in 1960.

    I don’t think any of the three fights was broadcast on live tv.

    • rickflick
      Posted June 26, 2017 at 10:34 am | Permalink

      The Patterson fights are on YouTube. I watched fight 2 and after all these years it seemed pretty familiar, even to the interviews by Howard Cosell.

    • Diane G.
      Posted June 27, 2017 at 3:50 am | Permalink

      Back in the day all these early TV events were so universal…I remember them too…

  3. David Harper
    Posted June 26, 2017 at 7:10 am | Permalink

    “On this day in 2000, The Human Genome Project announced its completion of a “rough draft” DNA sequence; perhaps many of you will remember that.”

    Remember it? I have the T-shirt, literally. The Sanger Institute had celebration T-shirts made up with the names of everyone working at the Institute on that date printed on the back. I’m in there somewhere. There was also an *epic* party 🙂

    • Posted June 26, 2017 at 9:46 am | Permalink

      That makes you moderately famous!

      • David Harper
        Posted June 26, 2017 at 10:38 am | Permalink

        You need to get up close to the T-shirt to read the names. Mine was one among hundreds, so the print was pretty small, even on the XL shirts. Also (don’t tell anyone else!), I didn’t actually work on the human genome. I was in a group that focussed on pathogen genomes. But we all got our names on the shirt.

        • Diane G.
          Posted June 27, 2017 at 3:51 am | Permalink

          Congrats, nonetheless!

  4. Ken Kukec
    Posted June 26, 2017 at 7:24 am | Permalink

    As a Teutophone, you can perhaps put to rest the vicious right-wing rumors that Jack called himself a jelly doughnut? 🙂

    • Posted June 26, 2017 at 7:33 am | Permalink

      I was going to do that, but decided not to. Be my guest!

      • Ken Kukec
        Posted June 26, 2017 at 7:51 am | Permalink

        Sadly, ich spreche nicht Deutsch.

        • Craw
          Posted June 26, 2017 at 10:03 am | Permalink

          The argument is that a citizen of Berlin would say “Ich bin Berliner” with no ein, and the insertion of a superflous ein changes the meaning to to “I am a type of pastry called ein Berliner”. This is argument fails because only a *native* Berliner would say “Ich bin Berliner”. And *adopted* Berliner would not. So JFK got it right.

        • Posted June 26, 2017 at 11:26 am | Permalink

          Nein, “Ich spreche kein Deutsch”!

          • Ken Kukec
            Posted June 26, 2017 at 2:28 pm | Permalink

            Don’t I feel like a jelly doughnut.

    • RPGNo1
      Posted June 26, 2017 at 11:35 am | Permalink

      Wikipedia has a very good explanantion.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ich_bin_ein_Berliner#.22I.27m_a_doughnut.22_urban_legend

      PS: As German native speaker I concur with Craw. 😉

  5. Sabine Stevens
    Posted June 26, 2017 at 8:11 am | Permalink

    Is that PCC(E) on Hili’s cat dish? Love it!

    • Posted June 26, 2017 at 11:27 am | Permalink

      Yes it is, I had it made as a present for Hili so she wouldn’t forget me when I wasn’t there. There are pictures of both of us encircling the dish.

  6. JonLynnHarvey
    Posted June 26, 2017 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

    Is “ich bin win Berliner” cultural appropriation?

  7. Diane G.
    Posted June 27, 2017 at 3:54 am | Permalink

    That Life in General bug must be going around–I’ve had a nagging case of it too…

    • Posted June 27, 2017 at 7:09 am | Permalink

      Unfortunately, the prognosis is not good. The mortality rate is 100%

      • Diane G.
        Posted June 28, 2017 at 12:32 am | Permalink

        Oh, that helps!

        ( 😀 )


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