Readers’ wildlife photos

Reader Tony Eales, from Queensland, sent a passel of reptile photos; his notes are indented.

A set of Squamates.

First a particularly pretty little skink called the Shaded-litter Rainbow-skinkCarlia munda:

A close up of the common striped wall skinkCryptoblepharus virgatus:

One of the small common dragons (Agamids) with the charming name of Tommy RoundheadDiporiphera australis:

Another Agamid the Borneo Angle-Headed Agamid or Borneo Forest DragonGonocephalus borneensis:

An extreme close-up of the eye of an Asian House GeckoHemidactylus frenatus. These have become very invasive in my home city during my lifetime. I recall as a kid the excitement at seeing any gecko and now every house has them crawling around outdoor lights and making their chuk-chuk-chuk calls.

An Eastern Water Dragon, Itelagama lesuerii lesuerii. These are very common close to creeks in the city, right in to parks in the CBD. Large males can be brightly coloured and pretty large for a town lizard.

My favourite photo of an Eastern Brown SnakePseudonaja textilis. I was walking through some grass in a dry creek bed and saw the snake not three feet away at the same time it saw me. It raised its head, not in a threatening way, more of an “Oh! What are you?” way and I froze too. We both sized each other up and I slowly got out my camera, took the snap, put my camera away and backed away slowly and it headed off in another direction. One of my favourite encounters just respectful with enough adrenalin to make it memorable.

A Blue-Tongue Lizard, Tilqua scincoides, in an environment I would never have imagined seeing one. It was out in the middle of tidal flats at low time swimming  through the shallow pools. He was a good 50cm long, a sizable specimen. These lizards are relatively common in urban areas, often seen stealing dog or cat food from outside bowls.

Gibber Earless DragonTympanocryptis intima. They aren’t a large dragon, around 5cm snout to vent but this one was the smallest dragon I’d ever seen, maybe 1.5cm snout to vent.

I finally got a photograph of a Sand GoannaVaranus gouldii, last year. The larger Lace Monitor is far more common in my area. The Sand Goanna is the one which my indigenous informants tell me is the one to eat because they’re clean, they say Lace Monitors are dirty and will crawl up the arse of a dead pig to eat its innards.

19 Comments

  1. Posted May 25, 2017 at 7:36 am | Permalink

    [ Smiles ] Great pictures of wildlife!

  2. Ken Phelps
    Posted May 25, 2017 at 7:55 am | Permalink

    “… and will crawl up the arse of a dead pig to eat its innards.”

    Thus fueling the fantasies of alien cattle mutilation believers. Well, I suppose beliefs have been founded on less…

  3. darrelle
    Posted May 25, 2017 at 8:15 am | Permalink

    Uhhh, Tony? I think you badly misread that Eastern Brown Snake. That is clearly a “Come on, just one step closer, I double-dog-dare ya,” look that it’s giving you.

    You’ve got a lot of cool lizards in your area. Large monitors, .5 meter Blue Tongued lizards. The Eastern Water Dragon and the Borneo Forest Dragon are very nice too. My kids would go nuts there.

  4. Posted May 25, 2017 at 8:25 am | Permalink

    Very nice photos! Thanks!

  5. barn owl
    Posted May 25, 2017 at 10:14 am | Permalink

    Exquisite photos – I especially love the dragons. Our diversity of backyard lizards here in South Texas pales in comparison (and I’m fortunate to have Texas spiny lizards that breed in my backyard – at least one nest in the shelter of a rosemary plant in the rock garden).

  6. rickflick
    Posted May 25, 2017 at 10:41 am | Permalink

    What a charming assortment of reptiles!

  7. Mark R.
    Posted May 25, 2017 at 11:10 am | Permalink

    Wow, that was some passel. I imagine the snakes are indigenous, but from the lizard names it seems many aren’t. The water dragon is stunning.

    • Tony Eales
      Posted May 25, 2017 at 6:23 pm | Permalink

      The Asian House Geckos are feral and the Borneo Anglehead was from a trip I took to Borneo. Otherwise all natives

  8. Posted May 25, 2017 at 11:28 am | Permalink

    Lace Monitors are dirty and will crawl up the arse of a dead pig to eat its innards.

    You say that like it’s a bad thing.

  9. Posted May 25, 2017 at 12:09 pm | Permalink

    An enjoyable set of Herps! I wonder if the Asian house gecko became established through the pet trade.

    • Tony Eales
      Posted May 25, 2017 at 6:20 pm | Permalink

      No it appears to have come in on timber imports. They first appeared around dockland suburbs and industrial areas and spread from there.

  10. kevin7alexander
    Posted May 25, 2017 at 12:21 pm | Permalink

    It’s called a goanna because it’s the best reptile to goanna pizza.

    • Tony Eales
      Posted May 25, 2017 at 6:23 pm | Permalink

      LOL I’m gonna use that one 🙂

  11. Heather Hastie
    Posted May 25, 2017 at 1:01 pm | Permalink

    Interesting bunch of pics. Thanks for sharing.

  12. José Ramón López Rubí C
    Posted May 25, 2017 at 1:42 pm | Permalink

    Hi Jerry. Let me share some “artsy” wildlife photos. The first is a cormoran. The second and third are pictures of “aplomado” falcons. The three were taken (by me) in the Centla Glades of Tabasco, México. Greetings from Mexico City,

    José Ramón.

    On Thu, May 25, 2017 at 7:31 AM, Why Evolution Is True wrote:

    > whyevolutionistrue posted: “Reader Tony Eales, from Queensland, sent a > passel of reptile photos; his notes are indented. A set of Squamates. First > a particularly pretty little skink called the Shaded-litter > Rainbow-skink, Carlia munda: A close up of the common striped wall sk” >

    • Posted May 25, 2017 at 1:48 pm | Permalink

      You’ll have to send them to me at my email address (click “research interests” at upper right)

  13. Lars
    Posted May 25, 2017 at 1:52 pm | Permalink

    Very nice squamates.


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