Finger and mousetrap tricks

I still do the “thumb removal” trick, but very badly. This guy does it fantastically, and uses all the other fingers as well. Maybe I should practice this. . .

How on Earth does he do the last finger movement trick, though?

The YouTube video has a funny comment under it:

And “Slow Mo Guys” created a video in which one of them dives onto a trampoline with a thousand loaded mousetraps. The diver wasn’t injured, but it goes to show that no matter how weird and pointless an act might be, you can always find it on the Internet.

18 Comments

  1. Randy schenck
    Posted May 13, 2017 at 3:05 pm | Permalink

    The only thing I can think to say is Splinters.

  2. Robert Seidel
    Posted May 13, 2017 at 4:37 pm | Permalink

    This mousetrap video (illustrating nuclear chain reaction) is better – starting at 9:10.

    [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ranSh-lZsxM]

  3. dargndorp
    Posted May 13, 2017 at 4:59 pm | Permalink

    When the right hand’s pinkie seems to detach, you see the middle finger of the left hand in its place.

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted May 13, 2017 at 11:50 pm | Permalink

      Well yes. That was the one I found most unsettling, till I realised what was done.

      But extremely skillful manipulation, all of it.

      cr

      • Posted May 14, 2017 at 2:31 am | Permalink

        The very unsettling aspect of a finger being ‘broken off’ is part of the trick, that is, the all important distraction which in this case is psychological, disarming both the viewer’s vision and logic. Being disarmed works just for a few seconds however, and then logic kicks in especially if that bit of the vid is paused. As dargndorp perceived, the middle finger of the left hand hides the pinky on the right hand so as the left pinky is ‘broken off’, the right pinky lowers till it vanishes. His having long slender fingers also help in pulling off the illusion.

        Yes, I live for meta-analysis! 🙂

        • Posted May 14, 2017 at 2:37 am | Permalink

          ‘…the middle finger of the left hand hides the pinky on the right hand so as the left pinky is ‘broken off’, the right pinky lowers till it vanishes.

          Boy it’s challenging to describe: the middle finger of the left hand hides the pinky on the right hand so as the supposed right pinky is ‘broken off’ (which is really the left middle finger), the real right pinky lowers till it vanishes.

    • Posted May 14, 2017 at 7:45 am | Permalink

      That must be it. But I don’t see the switch, even though i know what to look for.

  4. Ken Kukec
    Posted May 13, 2017 at 5:23 pm | Permalink

    There were a couple women who sat across the auditorium-style classroom in first-year “Contracts” class that I would entertain with the thumb-removal trick during low spots in the lectures.

    Hadn’t thought about that in years, man.

  5. Ken Kukec
    Posted May 13, 2017 at 5:32 pm | Permalink

    I’d as lief climb down into that pit of snakes with Indiana Jones as willingly to dive into a thousand mousetraps.

    Pretty cool lookin’, though.

  6. Torbjörn Larsson
    Posted May 13, 2017 at 6:44 pm | Permalink

    Someone forgot his security goggles…

  7. infiniteimprobabilit
    Posted May 13, 2017 at 11:53 pm | Permalink

    Interesting that the mousetraps round the edge went off first (or at least, bounced into the air first). I assume the impact of the guy in the centre of the tramp must have generated an outward-moving wave which increased in intensity (or lateral acceleration) as it approached the fixed edge. Not what I would intuitively have expected, at all.

    cr

  8. infiniteimprobabilit
    Posted May 14, 2017 at 12:33 am | Permalink

    Another one of theirs – how to cut a watermelon in half by stretching rubber bands round it. Fascinating the way it suddenly ‘goes’.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK8dsAeMmPk

    Why it goes suddenly is that the entire skin of the watermelon is under stress and once a crack starts, it then spreads with lightning speed, and the shell of the watermelon then becomes a much less ‘strong’ shape to resist the pressure of the rubber bands.

    cr

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted May 14, 2017 at 1:03 am | Permalink

      And here’s a couple of slow-mo kitteh-related (hence by definition On Topic on this site!) videos from the same guys.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xN12kR4TLc

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=705OzYq7cXU

      Fascinating how waves run through Lloyd’s fur from the point of impact when he lands.

      cr

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted May 14, 2017 at 4:56 am | Permalink

      it then spreads with lightning speed

      At the speed of sound in watermelon crusts. The speed of propagation of electrical breakdown through air is considerably higher, including non-trivial contributions from ionisation of the air ahead of the bolt tip by UV radiation from the main body of the bolt. A complex phenomenon compared to the propagation of fractures through solid bodies.
      Propagation of fractures releasing strain in earthquakes is another complex phenomenon which receives a fair amount of study, for obvious reasons.
      Anyone care to hold the stakes on where the first megadeath earthquake will hit? I’d vote for the Ganges plain somewhere, with a caveat about Naples getting wiped out by Vesuvius (where there will be earthquakes, but it’s the pyroclastic flows that’ll be the big killer).

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted May 14, 2017 at 7:31 am | Permalink

        Okay, ‘lightning speed’ was a figure of speech and somewhat hyperbolic, I have to admit.

        In fact the crack propagation in the watermelon crust was probably significantly less than the ‘speed of sound’ i.e. of vibrations, since the splitting process will have been slowed by the work of extending the crack.

        Now if you really want a lightning-speed crack propagation, see their video of a Pyrex glass jug being broken, particularly the handle.
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xbuvcQrAOSk
        The thing about toughened glass (as I’m sure you know) is that the surface layer is in compression and the entire inside is in tension so as soon as any scratch penetrates into the tension zone the cracks do spread with ‘lightning’ speed.

        cr

  9. Posted May 14, 2017 at 6:56 am | Permalink

    If you wasted time and enjoyed it, the time wasn’t wasted.

  10. Posted May 14, 2017 at 7:49 am | Permalink

    The mousetrap one seems intimidating (I would not do it), but they almost all go off when airborne, well away from the jumper.


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