Readers’ wildlife photos

Don’t forget to send in your good photos. I have a decent backlog, so if your pics haven’t appeared yet, don’t be concerned. They will.

Stephen Barnard has sent photos of birds in flight, but left the identification to you. His comment:

A few of the BIFs (birds in flight) photos I’ve taken recently. Species identification is left to the reader. I’ve posted all these before.

 

29 Comments

  1. Posted April 28, 2017 at 7:34 am | Permalink

    Beautiful! 🙂

  2. darrelle
    Posted April 28, 2017 at 8:14 am | Permalink

    That last bald eagle pic, it’s doing the Goa’uld Death Glider pose.

    I think my favorite is the smallest bird, in the third pic. It looks fierce. And fast.

    • Stephen Barnard
      Posted April 28, 2017 at 8:23 am | Permalink

      That’s a Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor). They’re very fast and very erratic — quite a challenge to photograph in flight. They’re fierce if you’re a flying insect.

      • Posted April 28, 2017 at 8:31 am | Permalink

        No idea how you get a shot of a tree swallow! Around our house, they move very fast, all the time, except when perched.

        • Stephen Barnard
          Posted April 28, 2017 at 8:35 am | Permalink

          When hundreds of them are feeding over the creek into a stiff headwind it’s just barely possible.

          • Posted April 28, 2017 at 8:51 am | Permalink

            🙂

          • ivarhusa
            Posted April 28, 2017 at 1:44 pm | Permalink

            I, too, admire the Tree Swallow image as much as the eagle. All are wonderful. I appreciate the ‘tip’ to look for the headwind (that isn’t clearing the bugs completely out!). Its a challenge, for sure! I aspire.

            • Stephen Barnard
              Posted April 28, 2017 at 2:18 pm | Permalink

              The insects (Chironomidae midges at the moment, but the same goes for mayflies) are emerging from the creek. Their pupae come to the surface and the adult emerges and flies off. The swallows are picking them off right above or in many cases right on the water surface. In calm conditions the swallows feed much higher.

        • darrelle
          Posted April 28, 2017 at 9:47 am | Permalink

          “Spray and pray” is always an option for such subjects.

          • Stephen Barnard
            Posted April 28, 2017 at 10:08 am | Permalink

            I believe I shot 111 photos in a few minutes and kept two. The tough part is to (1) get the bird in the frame with a 700mm lens, and (2) get the spot-focus AF to lock on. The AI-Servo mode of the camera tries keep focus even when the bird lives the focus point, and sometimes it works. Of course, you need a fast shutter. This was 1/8000, ISO 1000, f/5.6.

      • darrelle
        Posted April 28, 2017 at 9:58 am | Permalink

        Sort of the EXTRA 330
        of the bird world?

    • Posted April 28, 2017 at 8:24 am | Permalink

      I was thinking it was like the Klingon bird of prey ship.

      • darrelle
        Posted April 28, 2017 at 10:01 am | Permalink

        [glowing eyes] You will pay dearly for your insolence. [/glowing eyes]

  3. Posted April 28, 2017 at 8:25 am | Permalink

    First class pictures, Stephen!

  4. Posted April 28, 2017 at 8:29 am | Permalink

    Very nice. I will give it a go.

    From the top:
    Sandhill Cranes
    Red-winged Blackbird
    Tree Swallow
    Canada Goose
    Northern Harrier
    Bald Eagle X 3
    Red-tailed Hawk X 2 (? second photo on center-pivot is tough to ID for me)
    Sandhill Cranes

    • Stephen Barnard
      Posted April 28, 2017 at 8:31 am | Permalink

      7/7

      • Posted April 28, 2017 at 8:51 am | Permalink

        Cheers! Lovely photos. Very tough to get! Nice and sharp!

  5. Claudia Baker
    Posted April 28, 2017 at 9:05 am | Permalink

    Wow, gorgeous shots all.
    Especially love the red-winged blackbird. This spring, for the first time, they have been coming to my bird feeder.

    • darrelle
      Posted April 28, 2017 at 10:05 am | Permalink

      It was quite a while ago, but Stephen previously posted a really stunning picture of a red-winged blackbird.

      Maybe he’ll dig it up and post it again here for us?

      • Claudia Baker
        Posted April 28, 2017 at 12:09 pm | Permalink

        yes please!

        • darrelle
          Posted April 28, 2017 at 2:13 pm | Permalink

          Hmmm. I searched the site but to no avail. There are actually many red-winged blackbird photos by Stephen, and a couple of others, over the past few years. Many of them are very nice but I can’t say for sure that one of them is the one I had in mind. Damn memory!

          If you want more Reader’s Wildlife photos just use the search box at the top left of the page. I searched on “red-winged blackbird” and got three pages of hits, all Reader’s Wildlife photos posts.

  6. Debbie Coplan
    Posted April 28, 2017 at 9:53 am | Permalink

    Gorgeous photos! As always…
    Thank you!

  7. busterggi
    Posted April 28, 2017 at 10:44 am | Permalink

    Got to see several American Egrets in flight this morning – wonderful!

  8. rickflick
    Posted April 28, 2017 at 11:37 am | Permalink

    Terrific. Great to see our feathered friends using their miraculous(evolutionarily speaking) skill. These must have been very challenging shots. Congratulations.

  9. mfdempsey1946
    Posted April 28, 2017 at 11:57 am | Permalink

    These masterly photographs go beyond capturing some flying techniques of fascinating birds. The photos also capture the very concept of flying itself. A wonderful achievement.

  10. grasshopper
    Posted April 28, 2017 at 4:58 pm | Permalink

    Red-winged blackbirds are pretty, but I understand they can be so prolific as to be a pest to farmers. They made headlines here in Australia decades ago when it was reported that they were culled in winter by spraying their roosts at night with detergent. The detergent removed the oily waterproofing of their feathers so that the rains would penetrate to their skin, and combined with the cold would cause them to perish. Are they really so pesky?
    In comparison to how Western Australia culled emus in the 1930s, that was mild treatment. The Western Australian government called upon the Army to deal with them, and thousands were actually machine-gunned, trapped as they were against farm fences.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_War

  11. cruzrad
    Posted May 10, 2017 at 6:05 pm | Permalink

    Outstanding photos!


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