Monday: Hili dialogue

Good morning on a snowy Monday: March 13, 2017. Snow is falling fairly heavily (though we won’t get near what the Northeast US will get), and we’re predicted to get 3 to 6 inches by tonight. Here’s a picture of the snow falling around Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House (1909-1910), which I walk by daily on my way to work:

Yes, the newspapers were right: snow was general all over Ireland. It was falling softly upon the Bog of Allen and, further westwards, softly falling into the dark mutinous Shannon waves. It was falling too upon every part of the lonely churchyard where Michael Furey lay buried. It lay thickly drifted on the crooked crosses and headstones, on the spears of the little gate, on the barren thorns. His soul swooned slowly as he heard the snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead.

(Grania says that there’s no snow in Ireland, much less “general” snow, and it’s tee-shirt weather in Cork.) But in the U.S. it is, appropriately, National Chicken Noodle Soup Day. It’s also National Elephant Day in Thailand, honoring all pachyderms.

On this day in 1639, Harvard College was named after John Harvard, an English clergyman who moved to New England.  On March 13, 1943, the Nazis wiped out the Jewish ghetto in Krakow, Poland. In 1996, a gunman killed 16 children and a teacher at the Dunblane Primary School, ultimately leading to severe restrictions on guns in the UK, and in 2013, Pope Francis was elected amidst the usual cries of “habemus papam.”  And that’s what happened on this day—not a particularly distinguished day in history.

Notables born on this day include Percival Lowell (1855), L. Ron Hubbard (1911), Neil Sedaka (1939), Charo (1951), and Dana Delaney (1956). Those who died on this day include Richard Burbage (1619), Benjamin Harrison (1901), Susan B. Anthony (1906), and Clarence Darrow (1938; one of my heroes).  Meanwhile in Dobrzyn, Hili is in her usual position as editor of Listy, but is also distracting the staff:

Hili: I wonder.
A: What about?
Hili: Whether this apple is from the tree of knowledge.
(Photo: Monika)
In Polish:
Hili: Tak się zastanawiam.
Ja: Nad czym?
Hili: Czy to jabłko jest z drzewa wiadomości.
(Foto: Monika)

14 Comments

  1. GBJames
    Posted March 13, 2017 at 6:52 am | Permalink

    Very nice snapshot of Robie House, Jerry!

    • Hempenstein
      Posted March 13, 2017 at 11:06 am | Permalink

      Indeed, and very cool to learn it’s on PCC(E)’s daily route. Hope we get an AFTER shot, perhaps in bright sun?

      • rickflick
        Posted March 13, 2017 at 11:26 am | Permalink

        A classic F.L. Wright. What a treasure. I can hardly imagine the uplift from walking past it every day. I’t must give a jolt of inspiration every time.

  2. Posted March 13, 2017 at 7:04 am | Permalink

    Winter is going out like a lion in Southeastern Alaska with up to 22″ in the last 24hrs.

    Skiers are orgasmic, of which I am one.

    Mike

  3. Posted March 13, 2017 at 7:07 am | Permalink

    Thanks for the quote of the last paragraph of Joyce. My brother read it when we buried our dad. After a rendition of Oh, Danny Boy and Mozart piano concerto, no. 23. Our Catholic friends were slightly shocked but impressed. There is a way to devise your own moving secular rites.

    • Posted March 13, 2017 at 12:12 pm | Permalink

      The Dubliners is my favorite Joyce work, possibly because it is the only Joyce work I understand. Or maybe I only think I understand it. With Joyce you never know.

  4. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted March 13, 2017 at 7:38 am | Permalink

    Would it be against Da Roolz to share a joke?

    • Posted March 13, 2017 at 7:58 am | Permalink

      No, as long as it’s not a filthy one!

      • ThyroidPlanet
        Posted March 13, 2017 at 8:28 am | Permalink

        Thank you – maybe :

        We are learning from the latest reports from Washington the Secret Service no longer are allowed to call out “get down” during an event.

        Instead they yell “Donald, duck”

        I heard this on Reddit.

  5. rickflick
    Posted March 13, 2017 at 8:06 am | Permalink

    It’s interesting to note that Clarence Darrow defended Leopold and Loeb while they admitted to killing a boy for thrills. He got them life sentences instead of a death. Darrow argued along the lines that free will did not exist.

    “…Darrow’s lifelong contention that psychological, physical, and environmental influences—not a conscious choice between right and wrong—control human behavior.

  6. Diana MacPherson
    Posted March 13, 2017 at 8:51 am | Permalink

    The weather forecast is ever changing right now because it’s hard to predict if the low pressure system coming up from the US is going to clash with some other weather system over us or south of us.

    I’ve had migraines this weekend with the unsettled weather & right now, I have a lot of nerve pain in my shoulder, neck & face because of the weird weather.

  7. E.A. Blair
    Posted March 13, 2017 at 9:03 am | Permalink

    My favorite Darrow quote is:

    “I have never killed anyone, but I have read many obituaries with great satisfaction.”

    I have what I call my Clarence Darrow Reading List, which is a list of the names of those whose obituaries I hope get published before mine. For some reason, a majority of the names belong to Republican politicians, although it’s my sister who is right at the top of the list.

    • Blue
      Posted March 13, 2017 at 10:11 am | Permalink

      I know, Mr Blair, your statement is in re the obituaries of folks not any more liked by you; and I wholly concur with that thinking: there are plenty of that genre of “those folks” about whom I, now, feel that same way.

      When, however, nearly exactly six years ago this month I read in the Des Moines Register this stranger’s obituary, I decided right then that I so need to write MY own and to get that task done pronto cuz, wull, … … one never knows. When.

      The stranger’s: “Judith Jansen Obituary
      Judy died March 10, 2011, from faulty parts and too much old. She once said that after she died, her first stop would be Hawaii; second stop, Paris; and after that it was anyone’s guess. Judy enjoyed a pleasant career for 38 years at Equitable Life Insurance Company of Iowa at a time when companies truly cared about their employees and treated them as family. She was well known by her co-workers– many of whom were dear, dear friends– for her sharp wit, unique humor, and an extraordinary writing ability. She was the author of several inter-company publications throughout her career that were insightful, clever, and entertaining. Judy is survived by her lifelong companion, Bob Oswald of Des Moines, as well as her beloved dog Nikki. She also leaves behind many friends who will miss her progressive outlook on politics and world views. She told a friend that her life lessons had taught her that there were really just two things to admire in a person: intelligence and kindness. Anyone who knew her well were aware that those were the two most admirable qualities that she possessed.

      In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Fluffy Butts Rescue Resort, a dog rescue organization, at http://www.fluffybutts.com . There will be a Memorial “party” for Judy on March 27. Judy’s friends may contact jansen277@gmail.com and ask for details.”

      “ … … from faulty parts and too much old” with, later, a big ol’ Kristin Wiig – / – Bridesmaids’ brand of paaar – taying plus any memorial donations to be made, say, off to a joint such as the Denver Cat Company ! That’ll be my style for m’own obituary, too !

      Blue


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