Readers’ wildlife photos

Tony Eales from Queensland, Australia sent a passel of photos of natural selection in action. His notes (species weren’t identified, so I’m putting up his photo labels):

To help top up the tank I’m offering up a set of photos of arthropods eating other arthropods.

Assassin bug versus beetle larva:

assassin-bug-vs-beetle-larvae

Assassin bug versus caterpillar:

assassin-bug-vs-caterpillar

Crab spider versus bug:

crab-spider-vs-bug

Crab spider versus fly:

crab-spider-vs-fly

Crab spider versus mantis:

crab-spider-vs-mantis

Crab spider versus stingless bee:

crab-spider-vs-stingless-bee

Dragonfly versus fly:

dragonfly-vs-fly

Spider versus something (photo unlabeled):

img_3039

Lynx spider versus bee:

lynx-spider-vs-bee

Mantid versus bug:

mantid-vs-bug

Mantid versus butterfly:

mantid-vs-butterfly

Spider versus alate (ant):

spider-vs-alate

Spider versus moth:

spider-vs-moth

Spider versus spider:

spider-vs-spider

10 Comments

  1. Christopher
    Posted February 17, 2017 at 8:20 am | Permalink

    What an amazing collection of death pics! Clearly it pays to be an arachnid, at least until the birds come along.

  2. Mark Sturtevant
    Posted February 17, 2017 at 8:36 am | Permalink

    Very good snuff pictures! I completely enjoyed that. In the crab spider versus something picture I think the ‘something’ is a big-headed fly (Pipunculidae. These are aptly named, as shown here: http://bugguide.net/node/view/67160/bgimage

    • roger thomason
      Posted February 17, 2017 at 1:05 pm | Permalink

      It’s actually a member of the Family Bombyliidae [Bee Fly]. Wing venation is different in Pipunculidae.

  3. rickflick
    Posted February 17, 2017 at 8:45 am | Permalink

    Just in time to stimulate thoughts of lunch.

    In other news, it’s fun to think that around the world millions of Homo sapiens dine regularly on small creatures like these. Great source of protean they say.

  4. bluemaas
    Posted February 17, 2017 at 10:06 am | Permalink

    Smashing set, Mr Eales ! Literally !
    but ?.lovely.?, too !

    Blue

  5. Mark R.
    Posted February 17, 2017 at 11:43 am | Permalink

    So are spiders the most successful arthropod predators? These pics indicate, yes. Really cool arthropod vs. arthropod photos, thanks!

    • Tony Eales
      Posted February 19, 2017 at 5:01 pm | Permalink

      Maybe the most successful at eye level as my macro lens limits what I can photograph above me and my arthritis limits what I can photograph below me.

  6. Posted February 17, 2017 at 5:19 pm | Permalink

    I have to say… hey where you going? I like this action. I was getting a little bored of nice pretty pics (not really) when death is a healthy part of living… are you insane? no, just a little morbid.
    I was just checking out alkaline hydrolysis, no need for that here as recycling takes another form, poo.

  7. ratabago
    Posted February 17, 2017 at 10:41 pm | Permalink

    Re: Crab spider vs mantis and Spider vs something, the spider looks like it might be Zygometis xanthogaster aka the milky flower spider. One of the Thomisidae crab spiders. This is a highly variable species, and I’ve got a few shots of it I keep meaning to get organised and submit to WEIT, if I ever get time.

    Arachne.org’s page on Thomisidae. Arachne.org is a great resource for anyone interested in Australian spiders.

    • ratabago
      Posted February 17, 2017 at 10:44 pm | Permalink

      And that should have been Arachne.orgs page on Zygometis xanthogaster, not Thomisidae. That’s what fane braid and rushing will do for you.


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