Thursday: Hili dialogue

Good morning! It’s Thursday, January 12, 2017. Tomorrow I’m leaving for the LogiCal 2017 meetings in LA (LAX) till Monday. Catch me there if you’re in the area, and if you want a book signed, best to bring one as I’m not sure how many they’ll have on sale. (Say “Meow” for a cat drawing!). In Russia it’s Prosecutor General’s Day (День работника прокуратуры Российской Федерации), and in India it’s National Youth Day.

There are three–count them, three–food holidays today: National Marzipan Day, National Curried Chicken Day, and National Glazed Doughnut Day.

On this day in 1915, The United States House of representatives rejected a bill giving women the right to vote; they finally got that right only in 1920 when the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution was ratified. (Switzerland took until 1971 for women to gain that right.) In 2004, the RMS Queen Mary II, the world’s largest ocean liner, made its maiden voyage. I’ve lectured on that ship twice during transatlantic crossings, and it was one of the great lecture experiences of my life (the audience was engrossed, perhaps sated from gambling and lousy movies, and the food was terrific).

Notables born on this day include John Winthrop (1588), Edmund Burke (1729), Jack London (1876), the odious Hermann Göring (1893, committed suicide while in captivity during the Nuremberg Trials). On that very same day Afred Rosenberg was born, a fellow Nazi executed after those trials.  Also born on January 12 was hockey player and Doughnut King Tim Horton (1930; is Tim’s giving free doughnuts today?) and Rush Limbaugh (1951).  Those who died on this day include Maurice Gibb (2003). Meanwhile in Dobrzyn, Hili is refusing noms from Malgorzata!

Hili: What are you eating?
M: A cheese sandwich.
Hili: I think I will just have coffee.
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In Polish:
Hili: Co jesz?
Małgorzata: Kanapkę z serem.
Hili: To ja się tylko kawy napiję.

From frigid Winnipeg, reader Taskin sent this photo of Gus occupying the blanket his staff was given to Taskin for Xmas but hasn’t had a chance to use at all. Title: “Gus therapy =^..^=”

img_6479

And, for those who still remember typing, Matthew Cobb sent a tw**t:

29 Comments

  1. Dominic
    Posted January 12, 2017 at 6:35 am | Permalink

    That’s one slice short of a sandwich!
    🙂

  2. Posted January 12, 2017 at 7:58 am | Permalink

    Looks like a Shiba Inu.

  3. Michael Fisher
    Posted January 12, 2017 at 8:25 am | Permalink

    QUOTE: “On this day in 1915, The United States House of representatives rejected a bill giving women the right to vote; they finally got that right only in 1920 when the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution was ratified. (Switzerland took until 1971 for women to gain that right.)”

    Britain:
    1918: Some women gained the vote – Had to aged over 30 & married to a man on the Local Government Register
    It also extended men’s suffrage to the right for all men to vote over the age of 21, and abolished most property qualifications for men.
    1928: Women gain full suffrage equal to men

    I’ve been told it was well nigh impossible for a woman to open a bank account on her own [without husband or paternal permission I think] in the ’50s in Britain, but I can’t find reliable info. Does anybody know the facts that applied in England/Britain?

    I did find this by accident: Ireland [I assume the Republic], 1976: Irish women are finally able to own their own homes outright.

    • Dominic
      Posted January 12, 2017 at 8:48 am | Permalink

      It infuriated my mother that official letters always came addressed to my father into the 70s… it was a slow process.

      • Michael Fisher
        Posted January 12, 2017 at 9:04 am | Permalink

        I wonder if Coutts & Co’s bank statements for Queen Liz II were addressed to Prince Phil the Greek? 🙂

        • gravelinspector-Aidan
          Posted January 12, 2017 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

          One rule for the rich, another for the masses.

    • Monika
      Posted January 12, 2017 at 11:30 am | Permalink

      Until 1977 married women in Germany needed to have permission from their husbands to work! It was very much frowned upon when a married woman worked, even worse when there were children around.

      Women in Germany were allowed to vote for the first time in 1919 (law from 1918), for once Germany was among the progressive.

      • Michael Fisher
        Posted January 12, 2017 at 3:07 pm | Permalink

        I like Germany’s restrictions on noise near dwellings [kids, mowers etc.]

        Mr. Grumpy.

    • ploubere
      Posted January 12, 2017 at 1:52 pm | Permalink

      My mother says she could not open a bank account in the U.S. in the 50s without my dad’s permission. She was British and came to the U.S. after marrying my dad.

      I could not find any information on this, however, in a Google search. The only things I found were that women needed a man to co-sign for credit cards and loans until the 1970s.

    • Heather Hastie
      Posted January 12, 2017 at 3:43 pm | Permalink

      Women in NZ got the vote in 1893.

      In 1982 I had a holiday job in a private hospital. If a woman didn’t pay her bill, a letter was sent to her husband. That was quite rare then, but probably ten years earlier it would have been common. (I refused to do it while I was there, and sent overdue notices direct to the women concerned.) I went back to work there for a short time a year later and they’d stopped the practice.

      When the contraceptive pill was made available, it was only for married women, and legally they had to have their husband’s permission to take it. Many doctors ignored these provisions, especially female ones.

      • Randall Schenck
        Posted January 12, 2017 at 3:59 pm | Permalink

        Just another not so good story – Many years ago I spent some time in Turkey, Izmir to be exact. They had a place there at the time called the compound. Had never heard of such a place and would not believe it if I had not seen it. It was a debtor’s prison, filled with women. I was told, if the woman or man, usually got in debt trouble, the women went there to work it off. I have no idea if they still have such a place.

        • Heather Hastie
          Posted January 12, 2017 at 4:51 pm | Permalink

          You probably know the English used to have debtors’ prisons. Stupid idea. You went to prison until a debt was paid, but of course while in prison you had no way of earning money. Back then men were imprisoned for not paying debts their wives had racked up, which also wasn’t fair. It was assumed men had control over their wives, and if they didn’t, they should.

          • Randall Schenck
            Posted January 12, 2017 at 5:08 pm | Permalink

            I did not want to complete the story in mixed company but probably should – the compound was basically a bordello with bars. In this place you were paying off debt.

            • Heather Hastie
              Posted January 12, 2017 at 7:19 pm | Permalink

              I wondered if that might be the case. 😦

        • Heather Hastie
          Posted January 12, 2017 at 4:53 pm | Permalink

          By the way, I “liked” your comment about Turkey because it’s interesting, not because I like the idea, of course!

  4. dabertini
    Posted January 12, 2017 at 8:59 am | Permalink

    “is Tim’s giving free doughnuts today?”

    I highly doubt it, PCC(e). But if you were here, in the GTA, I’d gladly buy you one along with a double-double.

  5. Posted January 12, 2017 at 10:29 am | Permalink

    Goring, Rosenberg and Limbaugh all born on January 12. The stars of evil must be aligned.

    • Pete Moulton
      Posted January 12, 2017 at 5:57 pm | Permalink

      Yes, but so was Long John Baldry, and he cancels their evil out.

  6. Posted January 12, 2017 at 11:41 am | Permalink

    Curried chicken and marzipan. Hmmmm!

    • gravelinspector-Aidan
      Posted January 12, 2017 at 12:15 pm | Permalink

      Served using a glazed doughnut as a bun. Though I doubt the dough would survive the loading.

  7. busterggi
    Posted January 12, 2017 at 11:58 am | Permalink

    Hili, I salute your self-control. My cats never allow me to eat anything with cheese unless I share.

  8. JonLynnHarvey
    Posted January 12, 2017 at 12:48 pm | Permalink

    Both Maurice Gibb and Barry Gibb died of the same relatively rare heart condition.

  9. ploubere
    Posted January 12, 2017 at 1:53 pm | Permalink

    My mother, who grew up in England where it was popular, loves marzipan. I don’t care for it.

    • Michael Fisher
      Posted January 12, 2017 at 3:09 pm | Permalink

      You should try English custard – it’s the bee’s knees if made correctly!

    • Paul S
      Posted January 12, 2017 at 3:18 pm | Permalink

      My sister, a pastry chef, has said on many occasions that marzipan is for decoration only. It is not meant to be consumed.

  10. Torbjörn Larsson
    Posted January 12, 2017 at 7:39 pm | Permalink

    I didn’t know this, but Sweden constituted women voting rights – with local variation – 1718 right at the start of ending ruling monarchy. And then revoked it – with local variation – 1772 … blame the Burghers.

    The modern right was constituted 1921. [ https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kvinnlig_r%C3%B6str%C3%A4tt_i_Sverige ]

  11. Diane G.
    Posted January 13, 2017 at 3:00 am | Permalink

    sub

  12. Shirley Beaver
    Posted January 13, 2017 at 6:38 am | Permalink

    Hili doesn’t like cheese??? I’m astonished. Every cat I’ve ever known has preferred cheese even over chicken (well, maybe that’s an exaggeration!)

    The only way to persuade them to travel peacefully by car to the vet’s and back was to feed them non-stop morsels of cheese – mousetrap variety.


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