Readers’ wildlife photos

Two shots by Garry VanGelderen from Ontario:

Here are three shots of a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) that visits our back yard almost daily. They are a little off on colour as they are taken through glass.

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The same fox was seen catching a squirrel just this afternoon [December 2]:


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And four photos by Stephen Barnard from Idaho.

Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in flight, a Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus), and a shot over the creek on a cold morning.

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11 Comments

  1. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted December 4, 2016 at 7:35 am | Permalink

    Hooray for RWP contributors!

  2. rickflick
    Posted December 4, 2016 at 7:38 am | Permalink

    My Maggie would be jealous of the fox who CAN actually catch a squirrel!

    The pair of mallards flying is a real treat. That milky soft background sets off the crisp, bright birds especially well.

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted December 4, 2016 at 7:44 am | Permalink

      I have to give all the critters a chance to run up trees when I let my dog out because she can easily catch them. I usually yell out the door, “run squirrels!” or “run chippies!” Sometimes I have to yell a couple times because the squirrels don’t believe me & want to keep eating.

      • rickflick
        Posted December 4, 2016 at 8:00 am | Permalink

        “Sometimes I have to yell a couple times because the squirrels don’t believe me”

        Try yelling in French. It’s all about accommodation.

        Here’s an idea: You might want to work out protocols for an experiment in natural selection. Illustrate the red queen phenomenon.

  3. Mark Sturtevant
    Posted December 4, 2016 at 8:41 am | Permalink

    Beautiful critters!

  4. Hempenstein
    Posted December 4, 2016 at 8:59 am | Permalink

    Especially when seeing a fox in person, always struck by how dainty their feet are.

  5. Christopher
    Posted December 4, 2016 at 10:40 am | Permalink

    Stephen, I cannot tell from the photo but do you get the yellow-shafted or the yellow-shafted form of flicker in your neck of the woods/plains/mountains?

    • Stephen Barnard
      Posted December 4, 2016 at 11:17 am | Permalink

      Red-shafted

  6. Posted December 4, 2016 at 11:00 am | Permalink

    Sorry to see the squirrel go down to the fox, even though I know it’s the way of nature. Do love the look of the foxes and what’s not to love in a name like Vulpes vulpes?

    Carl Kruse

  7. Diane G.
    Posted December 4, 2016 at 6:23 pm | Permalink

    What a gorgeous fox!

    Stephen, why are there no trees on those hills? What amazing frost in the foreground–that picture shouts COLD!

    • Stephen Barnard
      Posted December 4, 2016 at 7:05 pm | Permalink

      They don’t get enough moisture. This is high desert. The flat valley bottom is an ancient lake bed, sitting atop an enormous aquifer fed mostly by snow melt, which is the source of many springs. The higher elevations get enough moisture to support trees.


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