Schools bring out the therapy dogs and Play-Doh to help students distraught over Trump’s victory

Before the election I was disturbed by the many Facebook posts pointing out, over and over again, Donald Trump’s latest misstep, peccadillo, or odious statement. It’s not that I thought that this stuff shouldn’t be discussed on Facebook, but it totally dominated the feed, was repetitive, sometimes nearly hysterical, and above all, displaced the kitten posts!

But now it’s far worse, and my liberal friends rage against the rising of the Right in Facebook post after post after post. Not a kitten to be seen! I can hardly bear to look at Facebook.

Even worse: according to news.com.au, American school and college kids have been so traumatized by Trump’s victory that schools are deploying the full armamentarium of Safe Space Toys, including therapy dogs and Play-Doh.

At the University of Kansas, tutors reminded its 18 and 19-year-olds that therapy dogs were available.

And the girls at an exclusive private school in New York City last week were so stricken the teachers brought in the therapy dogs to soothe them.

. . . Students at the University of Michigan have been offered colouring books to calm them. [JAC: This unwise plan was canceled as cooler heads prevailed.]

Cornell University, an Ivy League college in New York state, held a campus-wide “cry-in,” [JAC: see here] with seniors handing out blankets, tissues and hot chocolate.

Tufts University in Massachusetts staged arts and crafts sessions for its devastated students and campuses throughout the country cancelled classes because students asked or professors were too distraught to teach.

Apparently schools in Australia, though far from Trump-Land, had similar sessions:

And in Australia, where we are all meant to be tougher, it was primary schoolers rather than adults who were feeling the heat of post-election disappointment.

Children as young as five have been chanting death threats as the backlash of the Trump presidency was felt across Sydney’s inner west.

The After School Klub at Newtown Public School confirmed it held a special art therapy lesson after students chanted “we hate Trump”, the Inner West Courier reported.

The After School Klub supervisor Bek Ames said her students were visibly upset following the election on Thursday.

“When I came in the kids were upset and chanting ‘we hate Trump’ and these are kindergarten kids who are five and six years old,” she said.

“Some of the kids were saying we should kill Trump and Trump should kill himself.

“I have never seen anything like this before — when we had the (Australian) election some of them talked about it but most didn’t know what was going on.”

While Ms Ames responded appropriately to the clearly disturbed children in her after school class, it is fair to ask from where did they get this trauma.

Yep, their parents, who started trumpeting on social media last Wednesday morning the advent of a new world order and wailing when they didn’t get it.

Oy vey! We need to get a grip. Trump is the President-Elect, we’re in for a very tough four years, but can we stop the wailing on Facebook and figure out what we should do next? That, of course, will take a bit of time as Trump lines up his Cabinet and decides which of his campaign promises he’ll continue to discard. When Al Gore lost to George W. Bush in 2000, I don’t recall the dogs, Play-Doh, or cry ins? What has happened to us? (I admit that Trump looks a lot worse than G.W.B.)

barbie-pooping-dog-play-doh-stop-motion-baby-doll-eating-from-toilet-animation-videos-compilation

Dog and Play-Doh

 

110 Comments

  1. nickswearsky
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 1:49 pm | Permalink

    I’m guessing that play-doh dog is the best selling toy of all time, no?

  2. Damien McLeod
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 1:50 pm | Permalink

    Kittens are far more important than Donnie, at least in my opinion.

  3. GBJames
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 1:51 pm | Permalink

    I don’t know. I could use a little Play-Doh. Or maybe I’ll just settle for a beer.

    • Christopher
      Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:26 pm | Permalink

      Exactly. Why didn’t the college students handle this in a more adult manner, as I did, by getting rather drunk and making crude angry remarks on tw*tter?

      Actually, it helped more to turn off the news, go for hikes and fossil hunts, and read some science books. Escapism, perhaps, but it works.

      • Posted November 23, 2016 at 4:26 pm | Permalink

        + 1

      • tubby
        Posted November 23, 2016 at 4:53 pm | Permalink

        When 9/11 happened we played video games. Until the bars opened, and had beer and poutine while we cried like the adults we were.

      • merilee
        Posted November 23, 2016 at 7:17 pm | Permalink

        I find that hikes are a pretty good panacea for all kinds of shit.

        • ToddP
          Posted November 23, 2016 at 7:22 pm | Permalink

          Yep. Hiking is definitely my drug of choice.

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted November 23, 2016 at 7:13 pm | Permalink

      It’s quite satisfying stuff to squeeze, isn’t it? Not that I’ve ever played with it, of course. Certainly not when anyone can see me.

      (My excuse for having some in my garage – it’s handy for e.g. putting on top of pistons to check valve clearances and so on…)

      cr

      • GBJames
        Posted November 23, 2016 at 8:27 pm | Permalink

        You squeeze beer?

        • infiniteimprobabilit
          Posted November 24, 2016 at 6:24 am | Permalink

          Nope, squeeze the playdoh, swallow the beer. It’s preferable not to get the two mixed up.
          🙂

      • HaggisForBrains
        Posted November 24, 2016 at 5:39 am | Permalink

        Hey, that’s a good idea. Must get some for the garage. Thanks!

        • infiniteimprobabilit
          Posted November 24, 2016 at 6:28 am | Permalink

          Last time I used it was to check the clearance between my home-built air cleaner top plate and the underside of the bonnet (‘hood’ in ‘Murican). I had about 1/2″ – just enough.

          cr

    • Michiel
      Posted November 24, 2016 at 3:40 am | Permalink

      Well I know what you mean. To be honest, I would love to have a therapy dog on standby from time to time. I love dogs, and being around them and playing with them always makes me feel good. But I don’t really want to own one and my girlfriend is afraid of dogs (and allergic to cats). Would be great if I could just call the therapy dog hotline and have them bring me a dog for a couple of hours😀

  4. Damien McLeod
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 1:51 pm | Permalink

    Puppies too.

  5. Joseph Stanss
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 1:54 pm | Permalink

    Sorry, this is just a bit round the bend. Bad things happen every day and while the election of Trump is a very bad thing it should not induce crying jags or hopeless response behavior in adults.

    • GBJames
      Posted November 23, 2016 at 3:34 pm | Permalink

      Is this a general principle, that no bad things should “induce crying jags” or you just don’t think what is unfolding is bad enough?

      • Diane G.
        Posted November 25, 2016 at 2:01 am | Permalink

        Yeah, I think crying jags are perfectly understandable in some circumstances. But I can’t imagine ever even considering being soothed by Play Doh. I’ve certainly hugged my closest dog or cat, though.

  6. Diana MacPherson
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 1:58 pm | Permalink

    They have therapy dogs at my university during exam time. I even think this is a bit much but I like the dogs anyway.

    Here is my “get off my lawn” statement: When I was a kid in elementary school, we were all having lunch when Mirko, a kid in the class, decided to open the window. Somehow he managed to cut his arm on it and he ran away screaming, with blood trailing everywhere.

    We all stayed in our seats (we got in trouble for leaving them) and ate our lunch with puddles of blood around us.

    Because we were bad assed!

    No, we really just didn’t want the strap (which they still had back then) for leaving our seats.

    • Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

      LOL

    • Heather Hastie
      Posted November 23, 2016 at 7:51 pm | Permalink

      Yeah, we were much the same. We’ve just had another major earthquake, and it’s end of year exams here. The kids in the earthquake zone are still sitting their exams while dozens of aftershocks are occurring.

      At the same time, I’m not going to stop complaining about Trump. I’m with John Oliver – I think it’s wrong to normalize his election. Someone like him in the most powerful job in the world should not be something we start to consider normal. We can’t have Kanye West making good on his promise to run in 2020.

      When GWB won, I didn’t like it, but I accepted it. I couldn’t believe USians elected him twice, and he got more votes the 2nd time.

      If McCain or Romney had won I wouldn’t have like it, but I could have accepted that. They were capable of doing the job.

      Trump won’t be all bad, and he will be better than his VP would be. But it can’t be made normal that someone like him becomes president.

      Here’s the John Oliver video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHbEfvR94rk

      • Posted November 23, 2016 at 8:40 pm | Permalink

        “Trump won’t be all bad, and he will be better than his VP would be. But it can’t be made normal that someone like him becomes president.”

        I agree, the things Trump said, and did, and the promises he made during the election, have lost him the right, no matter what he does as president to be considered a good one. I don’t hope for the worst obviously, but if he’s successful, what kind of a man, spewing what kind of rhetoric, with what lack of qualifications will be considered acceptable in 2020, or 2024. Will people be saying, “well everyone said Trump was a racist, sexist, xenophobe, and things turned out ok, so why not Richard Spenser, or Steve Bannon for president”.

  7. Posted November 23, 2016 at 1:59 pm | Permalink

    A useful term I’ve heard recently is ‘Trumphausen by Proxy’: children having the shit scared out of them by over-reacting adults.

    They’re kids. They don’t need another bogeyman shoving down their throats by parents and teachers. They’ve got enough problems with clowns under the bed and monsters in the closet.

  8. Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:17 pm | Permalink

    And if Hillary had won we would have seen a huge upsurge in gun sale, threats of violence, and 4-8 years of a investigations by a whiney congress. Maybe the left should abandon therapy dogs, and play-doh, and start buying guns to feel safer?

    • Posted November 23, 2016 at 8:59 pm | Permalink

      Also, if the left starts buying guns en masse, it would probably be the most effective way to get the Republicans to support universal background checks and other gun restrictions.

      • nicky
        Posted November 23, 2016 at 9:46 pm | Permalink

        😂😂😂

  9. Reginald Selkirk
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:18 pm | Permalink

    “Hey, it’s only fascism. Keep it in perspective.”
    /s

    • Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:19 pm | Permalink

      +1

    • colnago
      Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:21 pm | Permalink

      Recalls 1933 in Germany.

      • Posted November 23, 2016 at 3:01 pm | Permalink

        Yes, but with a few important differences: Germans had a choice between Nazism or Stalinist Communism and the entire society had fallen to pieces and was on the verge of civil war, whereas the US has on one side whining yuppies voting for Trump or independent because they “wanted to make a statement”, and on the other side right wing loons who would sh*t themselves if they ever met a real Nazi.

        Plus, Hitler would count as a war hero and had been brutalized by the war, and was seriously mentally unstable to start with but was no fool, where as Trump is [fill in space]. Hitler had a vision for Germany, Trump barely has a concept of the US beyond “feeding trough”, and “status symbol”.

        And Hitler ultimately destroyed everything he could, including himself, out of a morbid rage, whereas Trump could set half the world on fire (or worse) without even noticing the smoke.

        • ascanius
          Posted November 23, 2016 at 3:25 pm | Permalink

          Don’t underestimate the danger.

          Trump is surrounding himself with dangerous far-right ideologues of both the Christian Dominionist and White Nationalist varieties. They are the ones choosing the cabinet and establishing policy goals.

          The fact that Democrats have lost control of all three branches of the federal government and of a vast majority of the statehouses is cause for great alarm.

          The frightened students may have a better understanding of the situation than those mocking them do.

          • colnago80
            Posted November 23, 2016 at 4:00 pm | Permalink

            Dumbkopf Donald has also said he will nominate Betsy DeVos for Education Secretary. Ms. DeVos is a scion of the DeVos family that owns Amway, a “legal” pyramid scheme and an even bigger fraud then Trump “University”. She is on record as advocating tax money to private schools, including religious schools and charter schools. An advocate of school privatization. She is just as dangerous as Dumbkopf Donald’s foreign police appointments. This is the kind of people who will be populating the government over the next 4 years.

          • Posted November 23, 2016 at 4:03 pm | Permalink

            My tone might sound flippant, but I don’t feel flippant. I live in Germany and saw the looks on the faces of many German politicians after the election. They looked like they’d seen a ghost.

            I would say though, that those who have recognized the extremity of the danger, they would have pulled themselves together enough to fight against it as effectively as possible. Such a public show of weakness and and meekness in the face of a devastating defeat is not a good start for opposition.

            • Posted November 23, 2016 at 4:39 pm | Permalink

              On this site, I commented months ago that if I were Trump, I’d be happy to have as my opponents students who whine “We are in pain!” because someone has written “Trump” on a campus alley.

          • Posted November 23, 2016 at 4:33 pm | Permalink

            “The frightened students may have a better understanding of the situation than those mocking them do.”

            It is not about understanding of the situation, it is about whether the reaction is appropriate. Some cultures mock soldiers who get frightened at the battlefield.

            • ascanius
              Posted November 24, 2016 at 8:07 am | Permalink

              “Some cultures mock soldiers who get frightened at the battlefield.”

              And that is as useful as people who are mocking those students who are using psychological tools to process their strong emotions.

              Doing psychological work now on their immediate reaction does not mean they won’t be able to channel their feelings into useful activism later.

              LGBT suicide hotlines have been on overdrive since the election.

              The rollback of LGBT rights is very likely. Plus Trump has legitimized vicious rhetoric (and worse) in the name of ending “political correctness.”

              Do you (and Jerry) want to mock the distress of those depressed and frightened LGBT callers, too?

              It’s another case of the liberal circular firing squad.

              • Posted November 24, 2016 at 3:19 pm | Permalink

                I haven’t walked a mile in their shoes, so I won’t mock them, but I have difficulty understanding the thought processes of LGBT Americans who are troubled more by Trump than by the Orlando shooting. To me, they lack perspective. Actually, I’ve read about LGBT voters deciding to vote for Trump after Orlando.

              • Posted November 24, 2016 at 3:38 pm | Permalink

                Maybe I’m misunderstanding you, but I think the election of Trump/Pence is orders of magnitude worse than a one off shooting rampage by a bigoted religious fanatic. Just in the fact that we’ve got a vice president representing an entire country, and apparently respected by half of it, who believes being gay is a choice, it’s worse.

              • Diane G.
                Posted November 25, 2016 at 2:10 am | Permalink

                “I have difficulty understanding the thought processes of LGBT Americans who are troubled more by Trump than by the Orlando shooting.”

                What makes you think they are more troubled? I think they evinced plenty of anguish (appropriately so!) after Orlando.

            • ascanius
              Posted November 24, 2016 at 9:58 pm | Permalink

              Are you a Putin supporter? How do you view the Russian government’s current policies toward LGBTs?

              • Posted November 25, 2016 at 7:45 am | Permalink

                I am talking about the USA.

              • infiniteimprobabilit
                Posted November 25, 2016 at 3:37 pm | Permalink

                Well done Maya for not taking the bait.

                cr

    • Posted November 23, 2016 at 3:14 pm | Permalink

      Exactly.

      He just promised to deport millions, set up a religious registry, curtail climate change research, and more. Why the long faces?!

    • Peter
      Posted November 23, 2016 at 3:18 pm | Permalink

      Bullshit! This is not fascism, and calling this fascism makes us blind towards real fascism and real suffering. Calling this fascism shows great ignorance of history.

      Stopping making these ridiculous grandiose claims, because when you do you ignore those that have experienced real fascism and denounce what they have gone through.

      • Posted November 23, 2016 at 3:37 pm | Permalink

        In the post, replace “facism” with:
        “Someone who wants to deport millions, create a religious registry, supports stop-and-frisk based on race, threatens his political opponents with jail, threatens the press, etc, etc.”

        Still pretty bad…

        • Reginald Selkirk
          Posted November 24, 2016 at 8:12 am | Permalink

          You forgot the bit about supporting torture.

      • GBJames
        Posted November 23, 2016 at 3:39 pm | Permalink

        At what point does it become “real fascism”, Peter?

      • Diana MacPherson
        Posted November 23, 2016 at 3:53 pm | Permalink

        If you disagree with the term “fascism” as applied to this situation, please define what you consider fascism.

        • Posted November 23, 2016 at 5:57 pm | Permalink

          “If you disagree with the term “fascism” as applied to this situation, please define what you consider fascism.”

          Yes, tell us, and are we supposed to wait until all your boxes are checked before we can call it that, it seems to me at that point it would be too late.

        • Taz
          Posted November 23, 2016 at 6:26 pm | Permalink

          When an election is lost and the loser refuses to give up power. The right wing has been claiming Obama would do this for eight years, and before that the same thing was said about Bush.

          • Taz
            Posted November 23, 2016 at 6:28 pm | Permalink

            (I should add, or cancels the next one.)

        • Craw
          Posted November 23, 2016 at 9:20 pm | Permalink

          The burden of proof surely falls on those making the claim, which in this case is you. Yet you offer no evidence or argument.

          Peter is right. Fascism killed millions and Trumpism has not. Trump is not Hitler. There will be no death camps in Idaho, no invasion to carve out lebensraum in Alberta. Nor will there be, as under FDR, mass internment of whole ethnic groups. There is more than enough to complain about with Trump without need for self-aggrandizing fantasies about fighting fascism.

          • Posted November 23, 2016 at 10:58 pm | Permalink

            Well, if we want to be pedantic, one would not be wrong at all to say this administration has all of the hallmarks of a neo-fascist regime. The term “fascism” basically refers to populist-driven ultranationalism combined with a far right, anti-liberal political agenda. It’s perfectly suitable as a general description of Trump’s campaign rhetoric and overshadowing ideology (as far as his stumbling incoherence can be decoded). Furthermore, fascist regimes are not dependent on violence in principle, but *may* resort to violence in practice to achieve conformity, expulsion of certain citizens, or expansionism.

          • Dean Reimer
            Posted November 23, 2016 at 11:18 pm | Permalink

            Was Germany not fascist, then, until millions had been killed in gas chambers? What’s the threshold of innocent dead people before we can label it fascism?

          • Reginald Selkirk
            Posted November 24, 2016 at 8:14 am | Permalink

            “There will be no death camps in Idaho, no invasion to carve out lebensraum in Alberta. Nor will there be, as under FDR, mass internment of whole ethnic groups. “

            And what is to stop it? The institutions we have built up? How do you expect these to hold up when fascists have the power to alter our institutions?

            • Posted November 24, 2016 at 10:37 am | Permalink

              “And what is to stop it?”

              Exactly! Just imagine another one or two significant homegrown Islam inspired terrorist attacks take place. Would there be enough pushback to prevent Trump from ordering ALL muslims on watch lists, or who are known to have said anything problematic be rounded up?, at least until we can, as he’s said “figure out what’s going on”.

            • Posted November 24, 2016 at 12:00 pm | Permalink

              One way to stop it (maybe) is to draw attention to what could come if we are not careful and diligent – and you and the others are doing just that.

            • infiniteimprobabilit
              Posted November 24, 2016 at 4:21 pm | Permalink

              A few days back I was poking fun at the almost superstitious reverence you ‘Muricans have for your outdated Constitution.

              But then I saw this from Lowering the Bar:
              http://loweringthebar.net/2016/11/court-says-police-have-to-make-time.html

              and I’ve revised my opinion somewhat.

              I’d say, it’s a matter of whatever works for you. If that’s the Constitution, fine. So long as people – including, critically, courts – have respect for this ‘Constitutional bullshit’ (the police’s words in that case), it will continue to work.

              Don’t forget a large part of the Donald’s constituency is very fond of treating the Constitution – or at least one Amendment – as if it were a sacred text.

              cr

              • Posted November 25, 2016 at 11:35 am | Permalink

                Which is sort of almost paradoxical, because the constitution is designed to be changed (albeit with difficulty).

              • infiniteimprobabilit
                Posted November 25, 2016 at 4:56 pm | Permalink

                Oh, I agree.

                The reverence for the Constitution ‘works’ in the short term.

                Long term (over decades), the integrity of the Constitution and other institutions is dependent on the continuing support of society. For example, if Donald and the Repubs went full fascist and took society with them (not saying this is likely), I would imagine that within a few decades the Constitution would have been changed (or, even without changing the words, reinterpreted) to ‘mean’ exactly the opposite of what it says now. One just hopes that the ‘better angels of our nature’ prevail.

                cr

          • Diana MacPherson
            Posted November 24, 2016 at 7:50 pm | Permalink

            First of all, I haven’t made any claims on this thread. Go ahead and read through. I’ll wait.

            Second of all, asking someone to define their terms has absolutely nothing to do with claims or burdens of proof. It’s simply the first things people should do before discussing a matter. I may have a completely different idea of what fascism is and if I do, we need to square that before we can move forward with a sensible discussion.

          • nicky
            Posted November 26, 2016 at 10:39 pm | Permalink

            No, he’s wrong. Fascism does not need death camps or even extended ‘Lebensraum’. Benito Mussolini was the ‘father’ of fascism, not Hitler. He proudly coined the term after the ‘fasces’, a bundle of arrows and an axe, carried by slaves in front of Roman ‘VIP’s on walkabouts.
            The Nazi’s were fascists, but not all fascists were Nazi’s. Eg. Franco, the Caudillo’, was a fascist, but no Nazi. Despicable as his rule may have been, there were no death camps in Spain (nor in Italy, for that matter).

            • infiniteimprobabilit
              Posted November 26, 2016 at 11:24 pm | Permalink

              It’s a matter of definition, as always.

              Strictly speaking, Fascism relates to the system of political government established by Mussolini. But it seems (vide Wikipedia) nobody can quite agree on exactly what constitutes Fascism.

              However, ‘fascism’ is also loosely used to refer to any form of right-wing authoritarianism. In that loose sense, there are fascists all over the place. I do agree the Nazis were an extreme case, and not all fascists are as bad as the Nazis, fortunately.

              cr

  10. JonLynnHarvey
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:20 pm | Permalink

    A modest irony of this situation is that Trump himself got flak for a participating in handing out supplies to Louisiana flood victims which included boxes of Play-Doh. It was criticized by the governor of Louisiana as too much of a photo-op of DT.

    I don’t think the Play-Doh was his idea- it was just stuff on the truck, but the media seemed to think it comical to see DT handing out Play-Doh to flood victims.

    Daily Kos’s snarky coverage here.
    http://www.dailykos.com/story/2016/8/19/1562073/-Trump-Solves-Louisiana-s-Play-Doh-Problem

    Image here
    http://images.dailykos.com/images/289647/story_image/IMG_0098.JPG?1471665460

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted November 23, 2016 at 7:22 pm | Permalink

      In respect of that particular incident, Trump has my sympathy*. Yes it probably was just stuff on the truck, chosen by someone without reference to Trump. What could DT have done, say ‘this is silly’ and refuse to hand it out? Sometimes it’s possible to find yourself in a lose-lose situation.

      (*Though not sympathy for taking advantage of the flood)

      cr

  11. Steve Pells
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:25 pm | Permalink

    Some people really need to review rule #5.
    s

    • Dean Reimer
      Posted November 23, 2016 at 11:19 pm | Permalink

      Fellow cyclist, I see.

  12. Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:39 pm | Permalink

    Better shocked than indifferent or satisfied, of course, but jeez, if this is has rattled them into inaction, how will they cope when that a**hole gets into power and his cronies start boring their way into the institutions of state?

    Though I also confess I avoid watching anything with an audio of that blithering shitweasel’s rasping breathy voice. I don’t ever want to hear it ever ever again.

    My own way of letting my auditory system recuperate is listening to and watching Frank Zappa as an antidote. (And funny to see him ridiculing the Christian right and Al Gore’s wife demanding trigger warnings for rock songs. How ironic that that generation grew up to demand trigger warnings themselves, on great works of art and literature!)

    • darrelle
      Posted November 23, 2016 at 6:26 pm | Permalink

      Yakura, you are on fire here. Your comments have me laughing out loud! Thank you. Better to laugh than cry.

  13. Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:41 pm | Permalink

    With Trump’s revitalized export of “entertainment resorts,” there will never be another safe place again.

  14. Frank Quinton
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

    The power of brain washing. Start with religion and the rest becomes easy.

  15. Ann German
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

    I just heard on the news that Trump has picked some “school choice” advocate for Sec of Ed . . . play doh and dogs may be the most sophisticated curriculum we see for some time.

  16. Ken Kukec
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:51 pm | Permalink

    In the best tradition of this nation’s founders, who sat around their colonial safe spaces, commiserating over tepid tea, to cope with the trauma of taxation without representation.

  17. Ken Kukec
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

    There you go with “armamentarium” again, Jerry; you sprang that one us before, not more than a year ago.🙂

    (I’ve been holding it at the ready ever since, hoping to use it somewhere myself — thus far, alas, unconsummated.)

    • Posted November 23, 2016 at 3:08 pm | Permalink

      Never underestimate the munitions of the silent minority.

  18. Posted November 23, 2016 at 3:22 pm | Permalink

    Nice links to the alt-right Breitbart. Couldn’t fit in any links to Stormfront?

  19. alexandra Moffat
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 3:25 pm | Permalink

    Wondering if the concept of “hate speech” was the very beginning of all this speech victimology. The ACLU you has a good brief discussion of free speech on campus.
    Don’t these students and staff ever stand back and look at themselves and their idiotic wussiness?

  20. W.Benson
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 4:15 pm | Permalink

    Hillary is leading Trump by 2 million votes, or 1.6% of the popular vote.

    • Posted November 23, 2016 at 6:38 pm | Permalink

      But, emailz!

    • Diane G.
      Posted November 25, 2016 at 3:25 am | Permalink

      Yeah, I think crying jags are perfectly understandable in some circumstances. But I can’t imagine ever even considering being soothed by Play Doh. I’ve certainly hugged my closest dog or cat, though.

      • Diane G.
        Posted November 25, 2016 at 3:37 am | Permalink

        WTH? This comment already appeared a while ago where I wanted it to appear–comment thread 5. Normally I can figure out where I screwed up, but this time I have no idea why it also appeared here, an hour and a half later.

        Apologies.

  21. DrBrydon
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 4:21 pm | Permalink

    Jesus wept.

  22. Sastra
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 4:35 pm | Permalink

    Some of the ideas wouldn’t sound so awful if they were initiated by politically liberal student groups on campus. Sitting around with fellow Democrats and passing boxes of tissue and cups of hot chocolate around while people kvetch, commiserate, and try to come up with counter strategies seems like a rather nice coping strategy. It’s not really much different than my own — go on line, find my people, and vent.

    But it looks rather infantile coming from a presumably neutral administration.

  23. Randall Schenck
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 5:17 pm | Permalink

    Even little kids in other countries in need of therapy? Either someone is pulling my leg or there are lots of folks out there who need to get a life. Maybe a large sign that reads – get off the internet until you have received a full medical check and have been cleared to click on.

    The guy has not even taken office yet and we have this. Can’t wait till he actually does something.

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted November 23, 2016 at 7:28 pm | Permalink

      The reason people in other countries are upset is that you (that is, USA) have just elected a fuckwit who could potentially have major and disastrous consequences for the rest of the world (that is, us).

      Not that over-emotional reactions are particularly sensible.

      cr

      • Randall Schenck
        Posted November 23, 2016 at 8:09 pm | Permalink

        Ready, Fire, Aim. Yes, premature overreaction is not a healthy way to live.

        Actions are usually more important than words and I am just taking a guess that much of what comes out of this fellows mouth will not lead to action. If it does, then we react.

  24. Mark Sturtevant
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 5:58 pm | Permalink

    I do not think the reactions of young children is necessarily out of place for their age. They would have been conditioned by their parents about Trump, and had understood that this was an election pitting a bad man who was mean like a bully, campaigning against a good, strong woman to be the most powerful person in the world. In their eyes this would be a scary outcome, where good was fighting evil, and evil won.

    The day after the election I overheard a conversation between a mother and her young children, & the kids were also exclaiming that a bully had been elected president They were visibly confused and upset about it.

    Thing is, we have some young adults who are behaving in a way that would be normal for young children.

  25. Posted November 23, 2016 at 6:58 pm | Permalink

    Profuse projectile vomit could also be expected when witnessing the political inferno of such a dyspeptic kakistocracy.

    • bric
      Posted November 24, 2016 at 3:51 am | Permalink

      Nice Greek!

    • Diane G.
      Posted November 25, 2016 at 3:40 am | Permalink

      Another AWAD fan?🙂

  26. infiniteimprobabilit
    Posted November 23, 2016 at 7:10 pm | Permalink

    If, at the age of 18, someone had offered me a colouring book ‘to calm me’ I know very well it would have had the exact opposite effect. “Do I look like a f*****g kiddiewinks to you?” would probably have been my mildest comment. Along with a few more choice adjectives to express my sense of insult.

    As I recall, kids of that age do not take kindly to being treated as juveniles. You really have to wonder at the mentality of anyone who thought it was a good idea.

    cr

    • Posted November 25, 2016 at 11:37 am | Permalink

      Oddly, the local toystore does sell “colouring books for adults”, which involve more sophisticated patterns, etc. I don’t know if this is what is involved here, of course.

      (I was *always* too old for the other kind, it seemed! :))

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted November 25, 2016 at 5:11 pm | Permalink

        I suppose at a sufficiently complex level it fringes on painting-by-numbers. I think both could be quite satisfying, for people of any age.

        BUT, as I recall, kids in their late teens are quite sensitive about being patronised or addressed as children. So while they might secretly find colouring satisfying, I think many of them would never dare admit it.

        Just as, for example, I was always mad keen on railways and in particular steam locomotives. But from my mid-teens on I would absolutely not admit to being a ‘train-spotter’ even while I was surreptitiously noting down locomotive numbers. Now I’m old enough not to give a damn, if someone finds my behaviour odd that’s their problem.

        cr

  27. Posted November 23, 2016 at 8:07 pm | Permalink

    If I was the parent of one of those Australian kids I’d sit them down and explain calmly that it’s not some nutcase halfway around the world they have to worry about, it’s the spiders in the toilet.

    • Alpha Neil
      Posted November 23, 2016 at 9:55 pm | Permalink

      That and the fact that they could fall off the bottom of the world at any moment.

    • kelskye
      Posted November 24, 2016 at 2:02 pm | Permalink

      In Australia, we have to put a portion of our income into a retirement savings account, and that’s heavily wrapped up in the stock market. So when Trump was elected and the market started going crazy, my first thought beyond “how could anyone even vote for Nutjob McPussyGrabber?!” was “my poor superannuation account!”

  28. Posted November 24, 2016 at 12:31 am | Permalink

    I concur with everything Jerry says here. I left FB for about a week during October. After the election, I uninstalled it from my phone so that I don’t get notifications and only bother to look when I actively go to it on my PC’s browser. The nonstop barrage of posts from both sides simply hasn’t subsided, and that unfortunately includes the large amounts of unsubstantiated nonsense.

  29. bric
    Posted November 24, 2016 at 3:57 am | Permalink

    Charles M Blow in the NY Times:

    You are an aberration and abomination who is willing to do and say anything — no matter whom it aligns you with and whom it hurts — to satisfy your ambitions.

    I don’t believe you care much at all about this country or your party or the American people. I believe that the only thing you care about is self-aggrandizement and self-enrichment. Your strongest allegiance is to your own cupidity.

    I also believe that much of your campaign was an act of psychological projection, as we are now learning that many of the things you slammed Clinton for are things of which you may actually be guilty.

    You slammed Clinton for destroying emails, then Newsweek reported last month that your companies “destroyed emails in defiance of court orders.” You slammed Clinton and the Clinton Foundation for paid speeches and conflicts of interest, then it turned out that, as BuzzFeed reported, the Trump Foundation received a $150,000 donation in exchange for your giving a 2015 speech made by video to a conference in Ukraine. You slammed Clinton about conflicts of interest while she was secretary of state, and now your possible conflicts of interest are popping up like mushrooms in a marsh.

    You are a fraud and a charlatan. Yes, you will be president, but you will not get any breaks just because one branch of your forked tongue is silver.

    I am not easily duped by dopes.

    I have not only an ethical and professional duty to call out how obscene your very existence is at the top of American government; I have a moral obligation to do so.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/23/opinion/no-trump-we-cant-just-get-along.html

    • Claudia Baker
      Posted November 24, 2016 at 10:49 am | Permalink

      Perfectly said. I may have to subscribe to the Times, just to read Charles over the next 4 years.

    • Posted November 24, 2016 at 1:35 pm | Permalink

      At least Don the Con finally has a voice in Federal legislation. His poor family has been economically disenfranchised for years while being socially marginalized without access to property rights, funding, or business opportunities. No family has suffered more due to the former injustices of government tyranny!

    • Merilee
      Posted November 24, 2016 at 1:58 pm | Permalink

      +10^6 for the Charles Blow! ” You don’t get a pat on the back for ratcheting down from rabid.”

    • Diane G.
      Posted November 25, 2016 at 4:09 am | Permalink

      The NYT still has quality columnists. The much maligned MSM actually warrants our attention.

      I’ve run into people I thought were better than they turned out to be who seem to get all their news from websites that get the most clicks. Geezer that I am, I subscribe* to organs such as the NYT, WaPo, Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, etc. These are news deliverers that cling to old fashioned notions of proper journalism, though one still has to be aware of institutional bias. Keeping up with a cross section of traditional MSM seems to me the best way to gather facts in order to make up one’s own mind about any given issue.

      *I subscribe, because I consider myself forced into using an ad blocker(by virtue of the huge amounts of time I spent waiting for annoying commercial content to load), while I also feel strongly that the information I receive from the MSM deserves recompense.

      For the most part, they are also “cooler” media, though their comment sections can be quite vitriolic.

  30. Posted November 25, 2016 at 5:36 pm | Permalink

    These are too interesting times. Young people are bombarded with too much information and catastrophic forecasts about the environment, terrorism, global competition for a living wage, and other dangers and pessimism lurking around the corner. At the same time, many might not have been taught coping skills like taking deep breaths, unplugging from electronic devices and the news, meditation etc.

    So I don’t begrudge them their little security blankets or relief-fests from time to time, as long as they know not to invest too much time being paralyzed with fear and self-pity. A little break is good for all of us, so we can recharge, and then it’s time to buckle down to work to make things better, if one can.

  31. Mike
    Posted November 28, 2016 at 8:13 am | Permalink

    Relax, just sit back and take in the Show, it’s going to be a doozy.


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