Jesus ‘n’ Mo ‘n’ Trumpf

Today’s Jesus and Mo strip is called “lie”. (I believe that Facebook removed last week’s Jesus and Mo post from my FB page.) So it goes. In this week’s strip, the ever-forgiving Jesus gets caught in a conundrum. This is a prime example of the “begging the question” fallacy:

2016-10-05

18 Comments

  1. Randall Schenck
    Posted October 5, 2016 at 9:40 am | Permalink

    Same class of reasoning that can make one believe in all types of religions as well as conspiracy theories. Reading in the paper today where another man in Pakistan killed his sister for marrying someone of another faith. The father was outraged mostly at the dead daughter because the son was in jail and no longer earning nearly $200 a month and the rest of the family will learn of the daughter’s indiscretion.

    • Dominic
      Posted October 5, 2016 at 10:51 am | Permalink

      Ah – they actually jailed the son! Amazing…

      • Randall Schenck
        Posted October 5, 2016 at 11:09 am | Permalink

        I’m sure it is just a technicality. He will be released and back on the job soon enough.

  2. busterggi
    Posted October 5, 2016 at 9:54 am | Permalink

    Can argue that but it won’t do any good with true believers.

  3. Kevin
    Posted October 5, 2016 at 9:57 am | Permalink

    Jesus N’ Mo removed? For all it’s good, the shame of Facebook is it’s business model: supply must go up. No one’s feelings can get hurt. No one’s heaven can be criticized.

    • Posted October 5, 2016 at 11:07 am | Permalink

      I agree… they really removed the Burka tale? What a bunch of wienies.

  4. Posted October 5, 2016 at 9:59 am | Permalink

    You can hardly blame Jesus for reasoning like his followers.

    • Posted October 6, 2016 at 7:22 pm | Permalink

      I was gonna say, now there’s a cartoon of truly biblical proportions.

  5. Flemur
    Posted October 5, 2016 at 10:37 am | Permalink

    Jesus sighting in weather map.

  6. Dominic
    Posted October 5, 2016 at 10:50 am | Permalink

    Facebook = Faecesbook!

  7. JonLynnHarvey
    Posted October 5, 2016 at 12:24 pm | Permalink

    I’m currently teaching a course in logical fallacies at an after-school program in a local high school. I asked students to come up with subtle examples of various fallacies and it seems to be difficult to come up with a really subtle example of begging the question.
    Every one my students could come up with seemed to be absurdly transparent.

    • Mark Sturtevant
      Posted October 5, 2016 at 1:15 pm | Permalink

      I have experienced paranormal activity, and so the paranormal is real.

      I have seen a ghost so I know ghosts are real.

      • busterggi
        Posted October 5, 2016 at 1:21 pm | Permalink

        Good for you, now show us the evidence that supports your claims.

    • Richard Bond
      Posted October 6, 2016 at 4:32 am | Permalink

      Anselm’s ontological argument?

  8. Posted October 5, 2016 at 1:00 pm | Permalink

    +1

  9. Posted October 5, 2016 at 2:25 pm | Permalink

    Speaking of begging the question, don’t you just hate it when someone writes that something “begs the question” when they really mean “raises the question”?

    • HaggisForBrains
      Posted October 6, 2016 at 4:50 am | Permalink

      I’m afraid we’ve lost that battle.

      • Newish Gnu
        Posted October 6, 2016 at 7:48 pm | Permalink

        Agreed. I’ve redeployed my grammar nazi resources to the your/you’re battle. And sometimes to the there/they’re/their eastern front.


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