Thursday: Hili dialogue

It’s September 22, the autumnal equinox in the northern hemisphere, and thus the first day of fall. If you live on the bottom part of the world, it’s the vernal equinox and the first day of spring. It’s also the 265th day of the year, which means we have only 100 days to go until 2017 is here.  And, in the U.S., it’s National Ice Cream Cone Day.

On this day in 1776, Nathan Hale was hanged by the British for spying for the Continental Army. On Sept. 22, 1823, Joseph Smith claimed that he first found the golden plates pointed out by the angel Moroni; those plates were, of course, duplicitously “translated” into the Book of Mormon. And, on this day in 1980, Iraq invaded Iran at the beginning of a long and bloody war. It was, of course, due to Western colonialism.

Notables born on this day include Michael Faraday (1791) and Joan Jett (1958). Those who died on this day include, besides Nathan Hale, Irving Berlin (1989), Dorothy Lamour (1996), George C. “Patton” Scott (1999), and Yogi Berra (2015). In remembrance of Scott, here’s his mesmerizing opening speech in “Patton” (note: don’t bother going on about militarism). The movie won the Oscar for Best Picture in 1971, and Scott nabbed Best Actor Oscar, but he declined it. It truly is one of the best biographical performances on film.

Meanwhile in Dobrzyn, there’s a bad drought, but Hili just chuckles at the useless umbrellas sitting on the porch:

Hili: Nothing makes me laugh like an umbrella.
A: Why?
Hili: I don’t know, maybe because of this fierce drought.

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In Polish:
Hili: Nic mnie tak nie śmieszy jak parasol.
Ja: Dlaczego?
Hili: Nie wiem, może z powodu tej wściekłej suszy.
Ssshhhhhh. . . . Gus is sleeping on the unmade bed, saving his staff the trouble of making it:
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23 Comments

  1. Chris G
    Posted September 22, 2016 at 6:45 am | Permalink

    “And, on this day in 1980, Iraq invaded Iran at the beginning of a long and bloody war. It was, of course, due to Western colonialism.”
    Oh, the beauty of how a pithy, sarcastic, comment can speak volumes.
    Top marks PPC(E),
    Chris G.

    • Chris G
      Posted September 22, 2016 at 6:52 am | Permalink

      Deducted marks for me, clearly.
      Of course, I meant PCC(E), SORRY!

      • Chris G
        Posted September 22, 2016 at 6:53 am | Permalink

        … Professor PC you most certainly are not.

    • Posted September 22, 2016 at 11:41 am | Permalink

      But sarcasm aside, it *partially was*. See the infamous photo with Rumsfeld meeting Saddam during the conflict in question and so on. (Admittedly this may not have been immediately, but the US did militarily aid Iraq by 1982.)

      • Chris G
        Posted September 22, 2016 at 12:51 pm | Permalink

        Point taken Keith – the West may have sided-with and/or directly supported various regimes during various conflicts, but would we say this invasion was “due to western colonialism”?
        Chris G.

  2. Randall Schenck
    Posted September 22, 2016 at 7:01 am | Permalink

    Great movie and fine acting by many. Not so wooden as someone on this site said concerning the old movies.

    Patton was born to be a leader in war and it is good that he finally got to do what he was made for.

    • Posted September 22, 2016 at 7:29 am | Permalink

      Yes, Patton was one of the first movies I saw as a youth that really seemed “real”. I remember thinking, even as a kid, that most of the acting in most movies was pretty bad before the Method actors took over. And just a newer generation of actors and directors.

      • Ken Kukec
        Posted September 22, 2016 at 8:13 am | Permalink

        Thank Brando (and thank Stella Adler, Lee Strasburg, Elia Kazan and the Actors Studio — or, hell, thank Konstantin Stanislavski, the Russian actor from whose teaching “the Method” was derived).

        When it comes to American movie acting, there’s “before Brando,” and there’s “after Brando.”

        (Strictly speaking, Scott wasn’t a method actor — and was known not to have much patience with those who were — but the naturalism he brought to his roles was an outgrowth of it.)

    • darrelle
      Posted September 22, 2016 at 8:28 am | Permalink

      It is a movie I like to watch about once a year. After first watching it decades ago seeing Scott in different roles never quite seemed to work.

      • Ken Kukec
        Posted September 22, 2016 at 9:42 am | Permalink

        Scott was great in an earlier role as a general — Buck Turgidson in Strangelove. I don’t know any backstory, but would guess that had something to do with him being cast as Patton.

    • Hempenstein
      Posted September 22, 2016 at 8:52 am | Permalink

      Patton is indeed a great movie. There are a quite a few anachronisms in it, though, detailed here.

    • rickflick
      Posted September 22, 2016 at 9:21 am | Permalink

      I was curious about how closely Scott’s performance compared with the actual man. It turns out, very close indeed. This clip from a speech by Patton shows some of the same swagger and language. Speech starts at 1:50.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYjnWXFTQkM

  3. Christopher
    Posted September 22, 2016 at 7:19 am | Permalink

    I was curious about why Scott declined the Oscar. Apparently he said that the ceremony was:

    “Demeaning” and a “two-hour meat parade”.

    Finally, someone who agrees with me about awards shows.

    • Randall Schenck
      Posted September 22, 2016 at 7:24 am | Permalink

      I believe he was among the few in the business that did not think acting was a contest between people to be voted on.

      • Christopher
        Posted September 22, 2016 at 5:49 pm | Permalink

        EXACTLY! and it is especially true today, as it really is about who can hand out the best gifts to the academy.

        But of course a great movie or a great performance isn’t always something that will be popular, or will rake in the dosh. There are dozens of award-winners that nobody remembers, that nobody watches anymore, and there are hundreds of “losers” that have become a part of the culture.

  4. Graham Head
    Posted September 22, 2016 at 7:29 am | Permalink

    ‘It’s also the 265th day of the year, which means we have only 100 days to go until 2017 is here.’

    Errrmm, leap year?

    • Posted September 22, 2016 at 7:42 am | Permalink

      I was speaking quasi-metaphorically. I meant, of course, until New Year’s Eve.

  5. Posted September 22, 2016 at 8:49 am | Permalink

    Why did Scott decline the Best Actor Oscar? Why would anyone? Is that a thing? People do that?

    That opening speech, the gravel in his voice, and the word choices gripped me. Scott reminded me of my grandfather who’d been in the South Pacific in WWII. My grandfather often said “sons of bitches,” which is not a phrase I hear used today. My mother and her siblings would use it jokingly amongst themselves about each other, similar to Scott referring to the troops.

    • Ken Kukec
      Posted September 22, 2016 at 9:51 am | Permalink

      My mother once used it on my brother and me when she caught us up to some especially nefarious hijinks. After she stomped out of the room, my brother said “I don’t think she thought that one through completely.” 🙂

      • Posted September 22, 2016 at 1:13 pm | Permalink

        Hah! Exactly 🙂

        Modifying a famous quote a little:

        Inigo Montoya: “You keep using [sons of bithes]. I do not think it means what you think it means.”

  6. Posted September 22, 2016 at 10:38 am | Permalink

    When I joined the Army back in 1979, they showed this segment of Patton to all us new recruits.

    • Randall Schenck
      Posted September 22, 2016 at 8:15 pm | Permalink

      Sorry I saw your post so late. Did it do any good? Never had any kids so thankfully I won’t have to tell them I was shoveling you know what and where. I wonder if he was referring to Ft. Polk, La.

  7. Michael Waterhouse
    Posted September 22, 2016 at 11:44 pm | Permalink

    Two other great people were born on this day.
    Toni Basil, who had the hit “Hey Mickey”
    She recently had a bit on social media showing her rap dancing well at 73.

    And, Me, Mickey.


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