Oy, am I OLD!

Reader Gary called my attention to this magazine, which is over a year old already. In case you don’t know, AARP stands for the American Association of Retired Persons, described by Wikipedia as “a membership organization for geriatrics”. I get mailings from thm all the time, asking me to join, buy life insurance, etc. I won’t, though, as I’m not geriatric.

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In the February/March 2015 issue, Dylan gave his first interview in three years. To AARP! But don’t think twice: it’s all right.

Don’t laugh if you’re a youngster: the day will come when Beyonce is on the cover too.

66 Comments

  1. BobTerrace
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:23 am | Permalink

    I belong to AARP. You don’t have to be geriatric to join. The magazine is decent (profiles, interesting articles, etc.) Membership gets one discounts at many places (hotels, restaurants, car rentals, stores).

    • barn owl
      Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:54 am | Permalink

      Agreed. I joined several years ago, when I turned 50. I find some of the financial advice helpful, and it’s also informative regarding caring for elderly parents.

      Oh, and … I’m not dead yet!!

      • BobTerrace
        Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:56 am | Permalink

        Are you sure? Maybe we are all holograms

        • barn owl
          Posted April 26, 2016 at 10:41 am | Permalink

          On the internet, no one knows you’re a hologram.

          • infiniteimprobabilit
            Posted April 26, 2016 at 5:27 pm | Permalink

            None of you exist: the webmaster types it all in.

            – geriatric tagline

            cr

  2. RolandG
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:28 am | Permalink

    I’m slightly disturbed by the “The Power of Prayer” headline.

    Hopefully, the article ends with the result of “No power, whatsoever”.

    • eric
      Posted April 26, 2016 at 11:44 am | Permalink

      I was too. Then I saw that (Dylan thinks) Rock n’ Roll died. Sheesh. Play into the stereotype of an old person a bit more there, Bob.

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted April 26, 2016 at 6:13 pm | Permalink

        What would Dylan know?

        Paradoxically, from my point of view, rock is more widespread than ever, because it lives on on Youtube and probably some of those online paysite music stores. Probably even including Dylan if anyone bothers to look. [/snark]

        I keep rediscovering half-remembered songs from the 60s – 80s that I heard a couple of times and never since.

        cr

  3. MFranco
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:29 am | Permalink

    Jerry A. Trick. It only means an aged person – and everyone ages.

  4. MitchD
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:32 am | Permalink

    “The Power of Prayer: one man’s pilgrimage” well, at least they advertise this as an anecdote. That’s progress, right?

    • Dominic
      Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:35 am | Permalink

      Perhaps “can this career be saved?” is their interview Dylan?!

  5. Dominic
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:33 am | Permalink

    He is a christian isn’t he?
    hmmm…

    • Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:45 am | Permalink

      Jewish by birth; but he did convert at some point. Not sure where’ he’s at now. Like Prince, a Minnesota boy, born in Duluth and rasied in Hibbing on Da Range.

    • Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:48 am | Permalink

      From the Wikiness:

      In 1997 he told David Gates of Newsweek:

      Here’s the thing with me and the religious thing. This is the flat-out truth: I find the religiosity and philosophy in the music. I don’t find it anywhere else. Songs like “Let Me Rest on a Peaceful Mountain” or “I Saw the Light”—that’s my religion. I don’t adhere to rabbis, preachers, evangelists, all of that. I’ve learned more from the songs than I’ve learned from any of this kind of entity. The songs are my lexicon. I believe the songs.

      • Posted April 26, 2016 at 9:41 am | Permalink

        This makes sense to me. I don’t believe there is a god, but I love a lot of music that was made with the assumption of god’s existence. When I sing or listen to this music, I enter into the lyrics as well as a musical notes. At that time, belief just isn’t a question to ask. In general, however, I don’t believe.

      • Posted April 26, 2016 at 9:50 am | Permalink

        There was a time when the only radio stations I could get on long field trips were country western and Christian. I’d listen to one until I couldn’t stand it, listen to the other until I couldn’t stand it, then enjoy the silence until I restarted the sequence.

        Too often, the Christian DJ’s couldn’t trust the music to stand on its own. After playing a song that powerfully expressed human longings or peaceful confidence, or whatever, they’d add puerile commentary associating the song with some Bible verse. Stupid. Ineffective. And it would drive me to country western.

        Not that all the music was good. This was the start of “Christian light rock” which managed to suck the purpose out of rock. The nadir, though, was a pseudohymn sung by prepubescent boys, who chorused the refrain “I’m so bad, I’m so bad, I’m so bad.”

        • infiniteimprobabilit
          Posted April 26, 2016 at 5:36 pm | Permalink

          “There was a time when the only radio stations I could get on long field trips were country western and Christian. I’d listen to one until I couldn’t stand it, listen to the other until I couldn’t stand it, then enjoy the silence until I restarted the sequence.”

          Ain’t cassette/CD/MP3 players marvellous?

          I *never* listened to music radio stations. I would try, and after about ten minutes of the DJ’s inane babble I’d turn it off in disgust. Now it’s a conditioned reflex – hop in company pool car, start motor, then frantically stab at buttons on the dash till the babble stops.

          Besides, *my* selection of tracks I like is, by definition, hugely better matched than any radio station can manage.

          cr

    • Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:51 am | Permalink

      More from wiki:

      In a 2009 interview with Bill Flanagan promoting Dylan’s Christmas LP, Christmas in the Heart, Flanagan commented on the “heroic performance” Dylan gave of “O Little Town of Bethlehem” and that he “delivered the song like a true believer”. Dylan replied: “Well, I am a true believer.”

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted April 26, 2016 at 6:17 pm | Permalink

        I really like that one – it’s one of the few Xmas carols that is musically good. (IMO of course).

        I find I can usually ignore the words and just listen to the tune.

        cr

  6. Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:37 am | Permalink

    You’re geriacoyne.

  7. Jon
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:45 am | Permalink

    …eligibility (for AARP) at age 50; retirement not required! [I’m eagerly a-waiting the Springsteen cover story, sad there will be no Prince….]

  8. Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:46 am | Permalink

    You can join AARP at age 50. They start sending you invitations.

    • Brian Davis
      Posted April 26, 2016 at 1:32 pm | Permalink

      They have been sending invitations since I was in my early 30s.

      • Posted April 26, 2016 at 2:22 pm | Permalink

        Wow, do you share your father’s first name?

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted April 26, 2016 at 6:21 pm | Permalink

      “I’d refuse to join any club that would have me as a member”

      – attrib. Groucho Marx, though personally I think it sounds like something Oscar Wilde might have said.

      cr

  9. Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:48 am | Permalink

    Not to worry! You are not old yet at 9 years younger than I. Enjoy life and don’t worry about it.

    Who is Beyonce? 😉

  10. Randy Schenck
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:55 am | Permalink

    AARP, Just another name for lobby and a large one. Special interest, same as all the others, making money.

  11. Doug
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 9:12 am | Permalink

    I knew I was old when Valerie Bertinelli was on the cover–six frickin’ years ago.

  12. Paul Monne
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 9:14 am | Permalink

    I joined CARP, (the Canadian equivalent) last month at age 49; I turn 50 in May.

    My $20.00 membership fee got me a $50.00 discount on a first purchase from a company, and 5% on further purchases.

    It took me less time to join than it would have taken to earn the $30.00 I saved, so of course I’m a card carrying member. It gets me discounts other places too.

    • Posted April 26, 2016 at 9:28 am | Permalink

      CARP. Now that’s a descriptive acronym for an old folks lobby.

      • infiniteimprobabilit
        Posted April 26, 2016 at 6:24 pm | Permalink

        They’re goldfish?

        cr

  13. Joseph McClain
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 9:18 am | Permalink

    I am 60. One of my daughters just got her first bit of mail from AARP. She is Beyonce’s age or maybe a bit younger.

  14. Stephen Zeoli
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 9:20 am | Permalink

    AARP is the top magazine by circulation in the country, besting the next best competitor, Better Homes and Gardens, by a 3 to 1 margin. So there are a lot of us who are old… but definitely not geriatric.

  15. rickflick
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 9:32 am | Permalink

    I’m not so sanguine about AARP. They seem to do a lot of lobbying to advance the elderly (and not yet quite so elderly) at the expense of the young. At least that’s the impression I get. I think it’s a duty to pay you fair share of taxes to support the education and welfare of the next generation.
    Dylan has no gray hair. I wonder when that shot was taken? I think I’ll go take a nap.

    • Posted April 26, 2016 at 10:42 am | Permalink

      I totally agree that we all need to support education and welfare of younger people. However, we also need to support the older people we all hope to become (the alternative being unappealing). And anyway, you can get discounts on motel rooms with AARP membership.

      • rickflick
        Posted April 26, 2016 at 11:14 am | Permalink

        “All I want is what I have coming to me. All I want is my fair share.”

        Sally Brown

    • barn owl
      Posted April 26, 2016 at 10:48 am | Permalink

      Get off my lawn!! (j/k)

      I spend most of my week catering to the whims of young people (university professor here). I also pay my taxes, federal and property, on time and in full (I don’t qualify for most deductions – no dependents, no disabilities). Not prideful or complaining about it; it’s just part of living in a community and democratic society. I’m not sure how my AARP membership or attention to their financial advice is doing anything “at the expense of the young,” though.

    • jwthomas
      Posted April 26, 2016 at 11:28 am | Permalink

      “Dylan has no gray hair. I wonder when that shot was taken?”

      Shortly after his last dye job.

    • denise
      Posted April 26, 2016 at 8:39 pm | Permalink

      Lobbying on behalf of any group is always at the expense of others – at least until money starts growing on trees.

      • rickflick
        Posted April 26, 2016 at 10:28 pm | Permalink

        True, but don’t you think when you’re on the glide path toward the end of life you should be showing a little deference and generosity toward the young. Or is every demographic for itself?

  16. walkingmap
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 9:51 am | Permalink

    In 2010 The AARP sent my d#g (just sticking to WEIT convention) an invitation to join complete with the card and everything, I still have it. Needless to say it did not inspire much confidence in the organization as she had been dead for about a year.

  17. Sharon
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 10:00 am | Permalink

    It ain’t no use to sit and wonder why, babe
    It don’t matter anyhow

  18. Posted April 26, 2016 at 10:17 am | Permalink

    Ha! At 37, I’m too old for Beyonce but enjoy Dylan. AARP won’t find me for a while.

  19. Jerry Tarone
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 10:41 am | Permalink

    My wife became a senior citizen yesterday. I’ve decided to stop having birthdays.

    • Posted April 26, 2016 at 11:00 am | Permalink

      As my friend says: “Am I a child, to have a birthday every year?”

      • TJR
        Posted April 26, 2016 at 11:32 am | Permalink

        Indeed. One of my ambitions is to completely forget my birthday, albeit not in any sort of Alzheimer’s sense.

        • Diana MacPherson
          Posted April 26, 2016 at 5:30 pm | Permalink

          I love my birthday. I take it off work every year except last year because I started a new job and had no vacation. It doubly sacked because I also had to get radiation after work. But I made up for it this year and ate lots of cake!

          • Diana MacPherson
            Posted April 26, 2016 at 5:31 pm | Permalink

            Sacked = sucked

            • rickflick
              Posted April 26, 2016 at 9:59 pm | Permalink

              I hope you weren’t sacked even once. It would be their loss anyway. I admire your sense of humor in the face of adversity.

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted April 27, 2016 at 7:58 am | Permalink

                Ha ha! Thanks!

          • BobTerrace
            Posted April 26, 2016 at 5:39 pm | Permalink

            Take off your next half birthday to make up for the one you lost.

  20. Doris Walker
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 10:42 am | Permalink

    FYI: AARP no longer “stands” for anything – it’s now just AARP.

    Yes, they have some nice discounts, they have some good info in their publications (but do tend to be woo-friendly), and they have a lobbying arm (I’m not sure why advancing the interests of oldsters comes at anyone else expense – we will all be a member of this group, given time).

    • Randy Schenck
      Posted April 26, 2016 at 11:46 am | Permalink

      Hopefully there will always be a few of us who do not join. Advancing the interests of oldsters is a nice friendly way to put it. Buying Congress for your personal interest is actually the definition of a lobby and they are one of the big ones. Right up there with the NRA, Parma and thousands of others. Just one big friendly democracy.

      • BobTerrace
        Posted April 26, 2016 at 1:52 pm | Permalink

        There are over 40 million Americans over the age of 65.

  21. JonLynnHarvey
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 11:44 am | Permalink

    Interestingly, at a very young age Dylan wrote a marvelous song about an old man looking back on his life “Restless, Farewell” the final track on his 3rd album “The Times They Are a’Changin” (and his 2nd album in which he wrote most of the songs- his first album was traditional folk songs with 2 tracks by himself).

    At the 80th anniversary Frank Sinatra concert, most of the performers did 2nd-rate renditions of old Sinatra songs. Dylan came out at the end and did “Restless Farewell”. He got the only standing ovation of the show.

    Complete lyrics from the official Dylan site here
    http://bobdylan.com/songs/restless-farewell/

    Video of performance at Sinatra’s 80th birthday here
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F44DBpIyAh0

  22. Posted April 26, 2016 at 11:51 am | Permalink

    I just read this month’s issue. Back page listing of notable birthdays in the month featured Janet Jackson who turns 50. I guess Beyonce mention isn’t so much of a stretch. 😉

    Got to admit I like the AARP discounts I get, so I’ve been a member since I became eligible.

  23. Posted April 26, 2016 at 11:58 am | Permalink

    But Neil Young said Rock and Roll can never die!

  24. EvolvedDutchie
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 12:23 pm | Permalink

    “Don’t laugh if you’re a youngster: the day will come when Beyonce is on the cover too.”

    True. But I hope the cover won’t feature “The Power of Prayer” anymore when that time comes.

    And in the Netherlands there is a political party for the elderly, called 50PLUS. I guess the American equivalent would be the GOP.

  25. Diana MacPherson
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 5:28 pm | Permalink

    I was rocking out to a song from the 80s playing in the drugstore. That’s how I know I’m old.

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted April 26, 2016 at 6:03 pm | Permalink

      When I was, like, young, I decided anything over age 30 was geriatric. So I stopped counting birthdays at 30 and refused to get any older. (Some might say I never grew up). In recent years I used to be quite disconcerted when young people would stand up for me in the train (though I always declined politely. Curiously, it was almost always scruffy-looking late-teens, usually girls, who stood up for me – never schoolkids and never people in their 20’s or older. Which is quite the opposite of the normal stereotype of yoof.)

      I still regard with scorn retirement villages, lawn bowls and other accoutrements of the geriatric industry. They’re full of old people. I much prefer to associate with younger people or at least others who never grew up. (Glares suspiciously at the assembled WEITers – ) You’re not (shudder) *old* are you?

      cr

  26. infiniteimprobabilit
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 6:34 pm | Permalink

    Speaking of geriatric…

    we (NZ) have traffic warning signs for mobile speed bumps, oops I mean old folks. For years the signs said “Senior Citizens”, till someone decided that wasn’t sufficiently euphemistic, now they say “Aged Persons” which is whole lot worse. You might be old, you might be senior, but when you’re *aged* you truly know you’re really decrepit and past it. 😦

    cr

  27. Amy
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 6:38 pm | Permalink

    Some people are born old, some people are forever young.

    I still think Dylan is too man for me. But I’m a born beatle fan, came to the world 20 years late… Don’t think I would ever like Beyonce very much, no matter how old I am now, she would be in my “OK” category. Not only people’s age, but also people’s taste makes the differences.

  28. infiniteimprobabilit
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 7:05 pm | Permalink

    Reading that cover of the AARP magazine, particularly the list of contents, I got this irresistible feeling of deja vu. “Outsmart a younger boss”, “8 easy ways to love longer” etc etc.

    I’ve seen that sort of thing so often on spoof specialty magazine covers like, say, this one:

    Like a Poe, it becomes quite difficult to distinguish the ‘genuine’ from satire.

    cr

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted April 26, 2016 at 7:08 pm | Permalink

      ‘ “8 easy ways to love longer” ‘

      Oops. That should of course be ‘live longer’. Anyone who thinks that was a Freudian slip could very well be right…

      cr

  29. Diana MacPherson
    Posted April 26, 2016 at 7:33 pm | Permalink

    Haha! Most of those could apply to me. You should see how groups of us at work complain about “feelers”. A colleague got chastised for not saying Hi to someone in the hall. Good grief. We poor analytical have a hard time among the feelers.


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