Hundreds attend funeral of Copenhagen’s murdering terrorist

Okay, maybe Omar El-Hussein, the guy who killed a filmmaker at a cafe and a security guard at a synagogue in Copenhagen, might have had a lot of friends and relatives in Denmark, but I doubt that had he died a natural death, more than 500 people would have turned up for his funeral.

But According to Denmark’s The Local website, and the video below, the funeral was really crowded.  I suspect that many of these people were there not there purely out of grief, but to express solidarity with El-Hussein’s heinous and brutal crime. That’s supported by the description of the funeral:

Friday’s funeral was open to the public but according to a report from wire service Ritzau was mostly attended by young men, who were described as “wearing large black coats with many of them having covered their faces”.

 Copenhagen Police sent out a press release prior to the service urging anyone attending to “show appropriate respect” while Kasem Said Ahmad, who conducted the burial ceremony, told Jyllands-Posten that he would require everyone to “remain silent”.

 Ahmad rejected media suggestions that a large turnout at the funeral would be a sign of support for the alleged killer.

“It is support for the family, not for him,” he said. “I do not think that anyone is coming to pay homage to him.”

Seriously? 500 people turn up for a 22-year-old murderer, most of the “mourners” men, and some with faces covered? Who is Ahmad fooling? I feel no guilt about suggesting that what happened here was a covert show of support for El-Hussein’s terrorism. Although most European Muslims don’t commit violence, I suspect—based on Islamic behavior in the rest of the world, including Australia—that many secretly applaud the kind of murders that El-Hussein committed. Since it’s unseemly in Denmark to celebrate by firing guns, shouting in glee, and handing out sweets (as the Palestinians do when their terrorists kill Israeli citizens), El-Hussein’s supporters “celebrate” by attending his funeral.

There seems to be a bit more dissembling in the further description of the funeral:

22-year-old Omar El-Hussein — identified by police as the shooter behind two fatal shootings last weekend —  was buried at a Muslim cemetery in the Copenhagen suburb of Brøndby despite objections from the Islamic group that owns it.

The group said it had considered denying a request by El-Hussein’s parents of to have him buried in the group’s Muslim cemetery, but that its rules did not allow for it.

“My concern is over extremist attitudes and actions on both sides,” Ahmet Deniz, head of the Islamic Burial Fund’s support group told Jyllands-Posten. “Both from his friends and from young Danish people who perhaps could also riot later.”

Well, I have no objections myself to them burying the murderer anywhere they want, but really, to express concern over “extremist attitudes and actions on both sides”? I haven’t seen Danish citizens murdering Muslims, or even rioting. What I have seen are sad and silent vigils by Danes and other Europeans. Deniz is trying to downplay the murders by equating the potential “extremism” of Danes with the actual extremism of celebrating this crime.

h/t: Jelger

48 Comments

  1. Hempenstein
    Posted February 21, 2015 at 10:30 am | Permalink

    Time will tell if his grave becomes a shrine.

    After the Nuremburg defendants were hanged, they + Goering were cremated under pseudonyms, their ashes dumped in the local river, and the cans that contained the ashes stomped flat and thrown in the scrap pile, to avoid prevent neo-Nazis from creating shrines at their graves.

    • Hempenstein
      Posted February 21, 2015 at 10:31 am | Permalink

      And after Himmler committed suicide, a military officer carted his body off by himself and buried it in an undisclosed location for the same reason.

      • Night-Gaunt49
        Posted February 22, 2015 at 9:31 pm | Permalink

        Not that it did any good, there are those who like those ideas and will keep them alive working to make it law of whatever land they live in.

        I am fearful that one day all followers of Islam will be forced to leave many parts if not all of Europe eventually over fear and hatred of all Muslims.

  2. $G
    Posted February 21, 2015 at 10:36 am | Permalink

    Short of the family and close friends, I’m not sure how the other 450+ can justify attending this psycho’s burial without it being a show of solidarity. Was this 22-year-old murdering waste of life that charming a fellow? I’m inclined to think not.

    “Extremism on both sides”. Yeah. Steering the car into the middle of the road like this is just going result in getting half the car smashed off (if that’s not just around the corner anyway).

    • Heather Hastie
      Posted February 21, 2015 at 10:47 am | Permalink

      Who covers their face at a funeral? As far as I can see, the only reason is because you’re expressing support for the killer’s actions and don’t want to be identified. I doubt they’re showing solidarity with niqab-wearing women!

      • Posted February 22, 2015 at 8:17 am | Permalink

        Reminds me of the balaclava-clad ‘mourners’ who used to attend the funerals of IRA or UDF thugs.

        • Night-Gaunt49
          Posted February 22, 2015 at 9:32 pm | Permalink

          Well our own extremists wear suits and uniforms and are under the USA or NATO.

    • EvolvedDutchie
      Posted February 21, 2015 at 10:50 am | Permalink

      Perhaps the other people were his facebook friends.

    • Torbjörn Larsson, OM
      Posted February 21, 2015 at 12:28 pm | Permalink

      Re charming fellow, not quite but also not without being liked:

      I’m not a Dane, but I read in the swedish media that El-Hussein was a troubled man that were on his way up, attending a vocational training center. He was an intelligent and sufficiently liked student, but reclusive and missionary about islam. As I remember it, there were suspicions that he had been targeted for recruiting by IS in prison, one of the main recruiting ways. It is an essential part of IS economy to get backers abroad.

      [FWIW, today the swedish media announced that the government funded swedish employment office has immediately shut down hiring external help for immigrants. They found out that in the last couple of month some of that help has started to do recruiting for IS.]

      • Peter Lund
        Posted February 23, 2015 at 9:29 am | Permalink

        Actually, there is nothing that points to El-Hussein being (“wasing?”) particularly intelligent.

        I know that the head master of one the high school equivalents he was expelled from (due to violent/particularly threatening behaviour) said so to the press. The former head master of his public school (K-9, in US terminology) also called him bright.

        Those people will say that about anyone with a pulse and they often do. (The latter is actually well-known for things like that.)

        Given his history of violence at those two places, there’s no reason to believe he was particularly well-liked, either, except by fellow young Muslim criminals (which they have plenty of at some of those places).

        He almost killed a guy on a train with a knife a couple of years ago. That only gave him a punishment of 2 years for “aggravated assault”. He didn’t know the man, he had never even seen him before.

        We know that he was a habitual, violent repeat offender even before that. We know that he didn’t even complete school. We know that showed problematic behaviour even in 5th grade, whereupon his mother moved back to Jordan with him for a couple of years. That probably didn’t help, either.

        We know he visited several of the worst Mosques in Denmark in his last years (Grimhøj-moskeen, Heimdalsgademoskeen). He had Jihadi-friends in Jordan, as well.

        This is not the story of a young man who had all options ahead of him if only he hadn’t mysteriously been led astray in the last few years of his life. This is the all too predictable story of a man who was given all chances and threw them all away. It is also the all too predictable story of a state that is too much in the thrall of a wrongheaded ideology to protect its citizens against dangerous people

  3. Randy Schenck
    Posted February 21, 2015 at 10:37 am | Permalink

    Seems very strange that the Danish authorities would allow an open funeral in this instance. They could have locked it down simply for security reasons. Looked more like a mob than a funeral.

    When you have these type funerals in the middle east there is always the chance of a suicide bomber or something. Have no idea what they are thinking.

    • Knud
      Posted February 21, 2015 at 11:14 am | Permalink

      But in fact it was very peaceful with only 10 (ten) police officers present. It’s hard to know what would have happened if restriction had been inforced.

  4. Knud
    Posted February 21, 2015 at 11:10 am | Permalink

    I’m a Dane living in Denmark.
    There may be more that one reason why people would rally around the funeral of a fellow Muslim. Surely a number of young angry men feel supportive of – if not his actions – then the underlying motivation.
    But I believe that the vast majority is simple morning the loss of a life. Several mourners to a Muslim funeral is not uncommon.
    You must understand that Muslims in Denmark (and Europe) are here with a very different background than Muslims in the US.
    Where immigrants to America in general are invited through the green card process and have at least some qualifications, many (Muslim) immigrants to Denmark are refugees from the Middle East especially Palestine, Lebanon and lately Syria, and they often hold not qualifications, face huge language problems and therefore have trouble finding employment. In turn large parts of the Muslim community have never been integrated into daily Danish life, and there is resentment towards each-other. Of cause not as a general rule but enough to play an important part in the public debate.
    This young man was apparently a poorly integrated Palestinian with a temper, excluded from his street gang, and then jailed for assault with a knife. So more a criminal than a jihadist- Marginalized by both mainstream Denmark and his peers on the street he may very likely have turned to this religious frame for recognition and outlet of his anger. I do not believe that his motives very deeply religious founded even if he thought so himself (although in general I think people who claim to be Muslims, and act in the name of Islam should be taken seriously) but rather a new-found way of letting out frustrations.

    All this is of course not an excuse for murdering people, but when we analyse what is the problem is and how we should handle it, it is important to get the motives right. And I don’t think the unfortunate incident in Copenhagen necessarily means that Al Quada or ISIS backed terror has come to Denmark – yet.

    • $G
      Posted February 21, 2015 at 11:33 am | Permalink

      “I do not believe that his motives very deeply religious founded even if he thought so himself (although in general I think people who claim to be Muslims, and act in the name of Islam should be taken seriously) but rather a new-found way of letting out frustrations.”

      The scary part is, however, that a religiously-motivated crime tends to inspire more of itself.

      There are, of course, a soup of factors that roll into the motivations of the shooter, but it’s yet another example of what looks to me a religiously-motivated murder. What’s worse is that 500 people showed. It may not be uncommon to get several mourners at a Muslim funeral, but not all Muslim funerals involve the burial of a murdering terrorist.

      • $G
        Posted February 21, 2015 at 11:37 am | Permalink

        *Correcting myself:

        There are, of course, a soup of factors that roll into the *psychology* of the shooter, but this incident is yet another example of what looks to me a religiously-motivated murder.

        It will only inspire more religious partisanship and inspire more to follow his lead. That his crimes did not deter 500 people from showing respect is not insignificant.

        • Heather Hastie
          Posted February 21, 2015 at 11:53 am | Permalink

          I agree it looks likely this young man turned to Islam because of the failures of other areas of his life. However, as Sam Harris would point out, if his religion was Jainism, he wouldn’t have been inspired to kill those who spoke up for freedom of speech and Jews. As long as there are imams who teach a violent form of Islam, there will be people who will be inspired by them. Most Muslims, of course, do not support the Islamists. However, there is an issue with the tenets of the religion that must be addressed within Islam.

          • Filippo
            Posted February 21, 2015 at 12:04 pm | Permalink

            sub

          • $G
            Posted February 21, 2015 at 12:08 pm | Permalink

            There’s also the fact that we’re referring to “Muslim funerals”. Which, built into the phrase, reveals the partisanship at work. If indeed most do not agree with the killings, that 500 *still* maintain political or religious kinship with the shooter is chilling. The only thing at work here seems to be side-taking. Hating the crime, maybe. But not enough hate, it seems, to place it above cultural ties.

            Even if the event were free of any *malicious* partisanship, that 500 people would show respect to a KILLER of their own faith and not the KILLED of other faiths shows that there are not critical or compassionate parties at work.

            • Posted February 21, 2015 at 12:27 pm | Permalink

              I wonder if 500 Muslims went to the funerals of the two murdered people? Now THAT would be a heartening show of solidarity against terrorism.

              • Draken
                Posted February 21, 2015 at 12:42 pm | Permalink

                I don’t know about Finn Nørgaard, but Dan Uzan (the jew) was buried with only those invited, plus a cordon heavily armed police.

    • Draken
      Posted February 21, 2015 at 12:30 pm | Permalink

      There isn’t much ‘officially’ backed terrorism from Al Qaeda or ISIS anyway. Especially ISIS uses Facebook as a proxy to call for lone-wolf attacks, with some success it seems.

      But El-Hussein seems to have had help and suggestions from others (esp. in getting a weapon), and he likely had several friends and a shady imam from Vestre Fængsel behind him, at least morally. Omar El-Hussein’s (former) schoolfriends and neighbours from Mjølnerparken have almost all given their support to his deeds (last week in BT).

      • Posted February 22, 2015 at 8:23 am | Permalink

        There isn’t much ‘officially’ backed terrorism from Al Qaeda or ISIS anyway. Especially ISIS uses Facebook as a proxy to call for lone-wolf attacks, with some success it seems.

        It’s the ideology that’s the problem. ISIS and an-Qaeda are manifestations of that ideology.

        There’s nothing ‘lone wolf’ about people who act alone but according to the same ideology.

        • Night-Gaunt49
          Posted February 22, 2015 at 9:38 pm | Permalink

          We see that same false use of “lone wolf” in the terrorism here concerning womens’ rights and birth control. Those who “act alone” were told to be sure to go that way so that their group who trained them can’t be directly tied in even though the violent ideology is the same.

    • Torbjörn Larsson, OM
      Posted February 21, 2015 at 12:40 pm | Permalink

      “This young man was apparently a poorly integrated Palestinian with a temper, excluded from his street gang, and then jailed for assault with a knife. So more a criminal than a jihadist- Marginalized by both mainstream Denmark and his peers on the street he may very likely have turned to this religious frame for recognition and outlet of his anger. I do not believe that his motives very deeply religious founded even if he thought so himself (although in general I think people who claim to be Muslims, and act in the name of Islam should be taken seriously) but rather a new-found way of letting out frustrations.”

      That history of El-Hussein seems only cover part of it, and the description of his motives seems not well founded considering his opinions. The other part of the publizised history, unless I am mistaken, is that he was in a good education, with no problems but a fervent interest in islamism. See my longer response to $G above.

      There is little doubt from the released data, and the repeated targeting of groups that islamists dislike, that this was a religious hate crime. How new-found El-Hussein’s islamism was I can’t tell, but if he was purposely recruited in jail, presumably by IS supporters considering their economy [which is still a speculation but the best fit to what happened], what does that matter?

    • EvolvedDutchie
      Posted February 21, 2015 at 1:51 pm | Permalink

      Knud is the most Danish name I can think of. But you put too little emphasis on the religion in my opinion. Even middle class or upper class citizens make their contribution to jihad. I think we should take these people at face value and listen to what they say. These people say what they mean to say. I don’t expect sophisticated theology(TM) from jihadi’s.

  5. gerard26
    Posted February 21, 2015 at 1:17 pm | Permalink

    If you are a Muslim, Wahabi, Shia, Sunni or Sufi, one is considered a “brother” under the Umma and even a murder like Omar el-Hussein, as long as he died as a believer in God he, is headed for al-akhira and all “kaffirs’ are are going to hell and deservedly so. The turnout at the funeral represents both support for the awful doctrines of the faith and the recognition of the glorious fate of all Muslims. El Hussein is just the vehicle for asserting that worldview and its so-called truths. The murdered people and their families are a secondary consideration and are offered nothing but insincere apologies.

  6. Posted February 21, 2015 at 1:21 pm | Permalink

    I don’t suppose that was just the line to the newest stall at the outdoors latrine?

    b&

    • Peter Lund
      Posted February 23, 2015 at 10:14 am | Permalink

      It pretty much was. He was buried from one of the bad mosques, one of those behind the Muhammed Crisis 10 years ago. The place he was buried is under control of a consortium of some of the more extreme mosques.

      There are plenty of other muslim burial grounds that are not associated with extremism that could have been chosen instead.

  7. W.Benson
    Posted February 21, 2015 at 1:51 pm | Permalink

    RT posts a lot of uncommented news videos that people can use to make up their own minds. I like that.

    • SQuiller
      Posted February 22, 2015 at 11:27 am | Permalink

      RT selects news to report to fit it’s anti-western propaganda mandate from the Kremlin and steers clear of reporting on the corrupt and vicious Russian authorities. I don’t like that.

      If they are anything like they were when I used to watch their news channel the selection of videos to make up your own mind about has already stacked the deck.

  8. Posted February 21, 2015 at 5:16 pm | Permalink

    JAC, you’re last sentence was perfectly on point.

    As for the crowd, that video has audio, and at least one person in that audio keeps calling out, “Allaaaaah hu akbar!, Allaaaaah hu akbar!”

    Is that, along with masked or covered faces on men, normal for a Muslim funeral? I doubt it, or every male would have covered his face and all the crowd would have been shouting in unison what we’ve come to recognize as THE terrorist chant.

    • EvolvedDutchie
      Posted February 21, 2015 at 5:50 pm | Permalink

      I’ve heard that “allahu akbar” is like “oh my god” in English. It’s used in all kinds of situations, thereby losing it’s religious significance a bit. But I can’t confirm this.

      • Posted February 21, 2015 at 6:19 pm | Permalink

        Perhaps it is used in that way, as, “Oh, my God!”, but I understand it translates to “God is great”, a close parallel to the Hebrew “Adonai hu ha-Elohim”, which is more like “The Lord is God.”

        Googling turned up variations which all ought probably to be verified before inputting them, here. It also included its use as a funeral litany. But, this was outside, between funeral and burial, when such a litany seemed more like a verbal protest sign.

        Hard to say, but covered faced plus that “litany”, at the funeral of a Muslim terrorist, makes one wonder.

        • Mike Paps
          Posted February 21, 2015 at 8:29 pm | Permalink

          sub

      • Posted February 21, 2015 at 9:25 pm | Permalink

        It’s a battle cry. No more and no less.

        Think Nazis chanting, “Seig Heil!” and you’ve got it about right.

        b&

        • Peter Lund
          Posted February 23, 2015 at 10:26 am | Permalink

          Sieg. Not seig. It means “victory”.

          Not that I in any way disagree with you, though…

          • Posted February 23, 2015 at 10:40 am | Permalink

            Thanks. E’m oftin crosseng my “e”s and “i”s in Inglesh, so E’m not at all surpresid that E’d do et en Girman, too.

            b&

          • Posted February 24, 2015 at 1:31 am | Permalink

            Do you suppose “sieg” is related to “siege”?

  9. Deepak Shetty
    Posted February 21, 2015 at 9:20 pm | Permalink

    I feel no guilt about suggesting that what happened here was a covert show of support for El-Hussein’s terrorism.
    Shouldnt you reserve judgement till someone analyses their facebook pages?

    • Posted February 22, 2015 at 8:34 am | Permalink

      At Nugent’s blog you have repeatedly defended accusations against Harris and Dawkins based on initial press reports about Hicks’s Facebook profile.

      Now you are saying what, we shouldn’t judge the attendees until we read their profiles? Even if you are being sarcastic you seem to be sending up a point of view you are defending elsewhere.

      You seem to be very selective in your attribution of support. Harris is supporting the killing of Muslims based on quotes you pull out of context but we should give hundreds of attendees wearing masks at the funeral of a known killer the benefit of the doubt?

      • Posted February 22, 2015 at 8:41 am | Permalink

        Knock it off. I don’t know if that comment is sarcastic (I suspect it is), in which case it should not elicit the rancor that has emerged. Stop it.

        • SQuiller
          Posted February 22, 2015 at 11:42 am | Permalink

          Jerry. Shetty’s comment was in the context of Michael Nugent pointing out the contents of Chapel Hill murderer’s facebook page to caution against jumping to conclusions about motive. This is him attempting a gotcha, something he has been doing a lot of on Nugent’s blog, usually with poorly thought out arguments.That is what drew the rancour.

  10. Diane G.
    Posted February 22, 2015 at 12:35 am | Permalink

    I have a hard time even imagining an “extremist Dane.”

  11. Posted February 22, 2015 at 7:50 am | Permalink

    Funny thing that if I would link this post to some of my liberal friends without saying anything about the author’s background, they would jump at him as some kind of right-wing extremist islamophobe wacko.

    (Note that they would probably want to label ME as right-wing extremist islamophobic wacko because I also share exactly the same sentiment as the author)


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