Idaho: First snow

It’s only September, but snow has already fallen in Idaho. Reader Stephen Barnard sends documentation. (There’s no way I can make this fit on the page without overlapping the website text, but the next post should fix that.) Click to enlarge.

RT9A8896-RT9A8899 (1)

27 Comments

  1. NewEnglandBob
    Posted September 27, 2013 at 3:17 am | Permalink

    Mount Washington in New Hampshire had snow several days ago. Temperature there yesterday was a high of 41 degrees, wind chill 31 degrees. This is normal there.

    • Dominic
      Posted September 27, 2013 at 6:20 am | Permalink

      New Hampshire 1
      Idaho 0
      ! 😉

    • Dominic
      Posted September 27, 2013 at 6:23 am | Permalink

      Wind chill – that is not really a very scientific measure is it? As far as I know there is no agreed standard…?

      • Diana MacPherson
        Posted September 27, 2013 at 6:32 am | Permalink

        There appears to be standard methods for calculating it (and speaking from someone too familiar with it – it hurts!)

        • NewEnglandBob
          Posted September 27, 2013 at 6:40 am | Permalink

          The NWS Windchill Temperature (WCT) index uses advances in science, technology, and computer modeling to provide an accurate, understandable, and useful formula for calculating the dangers from winter winds and freezing temperatures. The index:

          – Calculates wind speed at an average height of five feet, typical height of an adult human face, based on readings from the national standard height of 33 feet, typical height of an anemometer
          – Is based on a human face model
          – Incorporates heat transfer theory, heat loss from the body to its surroundings, during cold and breezy/windy days
          – Lowers the calm wind threshold to 3 mph
          – Uses a consistent standard for skin tissue resistance
          – Assumes no impact from the sun (i.e., clear night sky).

  2. Dennis Hansen
    Posted September 27, 2013 at 3:52 am | Permalink

    The dreaded Autumn Fog of Death ™ has started descending upon Zurich these days… I feel the need for a tropical fieldseason coming up in my bones. January, come hither!

  3. gravelinspector-Aidan
    Posted September 27, 2013 at 4:44 am | Permalink

    May be going up Ben Lawers with the wife this weekend. Into the rucksac goes foam mat (to shape the sac), artificial fibre sleeping bag, food, and an ice axe. Map and compass goes without saying. The rucksac itself is large enough to function as a bivvi bag.
    I’d much, much rather carry it and not need it, than need it and not carry it. It’s a good way to remain alive. I’m not sure that we’ll get snowed on, but I’m going equipped for whiteout and hurricane-force winds.

  4. Chris Slaby
    Posted September 27, 2013 at 5:58 am | Permalink

    Oh boy, this is really magnificent! Such stunning natural beauty. This makes me think I could move to rural Idaho in a minute. Stephen Barnard, your wonderful photography is doing excellent justice to your surroundings!

  5. Stephen Barnard
    Posted September 27, 2013 at 6:00 am | Permalink

    This panorama is a composite of four photos, created with a free application called Hugin, which I highly recommend.

    • JohnnieCanuck
      Posted September 27, 2013 at 1:08 pm | Permalink

      Click the image 3 times to get the full impact of the extreme resolution available, trees along the snowy ridgeline, for instance.

      • Stephen Barnard
        Posted September 27, 2013 at 2:33 pm | Permalink

        This is a large image. I normally share my photos on Facebook, which doesn’t allow anything close to this resolution. I’m grateful to Jerry for putting it on his website with apparently adequate capacity. As it is, I had to reduce the jpeg quality to “medium” to get a file small enough to email. It’s hard to do justice to a high resolution photo on a computer screen. (I use a 15″ MacBook Pro with retina display.)

        The light in this valley is like nothing I’ve seen before, and I’ve been many places.

    • Jiten
      Posted September 27, 2013 at 1:39 pm | Permalink

      Magnificent. How far away are the mountains?

      • Stephen Barnard
        Posted September 27, 2013 at 2:21 pm | Permalink

        Hard to say, unless I go to Google Earth and measure (a great app, BTW). I’d guess the closer mountains with no snow are about 12 miles away, the higher ones behind (the Pioneers) with snow about 20 miles, and the far ones up through the valley 30-40 miles.

  6. Diana MacPherson
    Posted September 27, 2013 at 6:17 am | Permalink

    Lovely.

  7. Posted September 27, 2013 at 6:57 am | Permalink

    Beautiful image.

  8. Posted September 27, 2013 at 7:09 am | Permalink

    Gorgeous! Where in Idaho?

    • Stephen Barnard
      Posted September 27, 2013 at 7:52 am | Permalink

      Four miles west of Picabo.

      • Posted September 27, 2013 at 8:44 am | Permalink

        Ah! We just missed that area when we drove through last spring. I think we took Road Creek Rd, just north of there, over to 93 and dropped into Arco for the night.

        Beautiful region!

        • Stephen Barnard
          Posted September 27, 2013 at 9:09 am | Permalink

          That would have been Trail Creek Road.

          • Posted September 27, 2013 at 11:27 am | Permalink

            That’s the one; it was a beautiful drive back then.

  9. Posted September 27, 2013 at 10:10 am | Permalink

    Beautiful photo!

  10. Lars
    Posted September 27, 2013 at 12:39 pm | Permalink

    There was snow on the Alberta Rockies earlier this week – I could see it from my bedroom window.
    Already getting below zero at night down here on the flatlands.

  11. JBlilie
    Posted September 27, 2013 at 1:29 pm | Permalink

    Lovely, thanks very much!

  12. uglicoyote
    Posted September 27, 2013 at 1:51 pm | Permalink

    Reblogged this on The Road.

  13. ploubere
    Posted September 27, 2013 at 2:12 pm | Permalink

    How I miss the West. Stuck in Tennessee. But on the positive side, temps are still in the 80s here.

  14. Posted September 28, 2013 at 11:26 pm | Permalink

    Lovely. I remember the early snows when I lived the high desert and mountains of central Idaho as a pre-teen, and I’ve laid eyes on many a gorgeous scene as the one photographed here.

    Idaho is a spell-binding and rugged corner of the country. If only the people there were a little more amiable, I would likely find myself back there some day.

  15. Posted September 29, 2013 at 9:03 pm | Permalink

    Global cooling for sure… We was there. Snowbound for 4 days! Walked out 5 miles. Still have to get the SUV and camping stuff before May 15 thaw.


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