Reasonable science standards for Kentucky students called “fascistic” and “atheistic”

There are new science standards in Kentucky, which I believe are the ones outlined on this page.  They mandate understanding of evolution (as a fact! OMG!) and an acceptance that humans are causing global warming. I give a sample of each.

Here are the standards for evolution in high school (grades 9-12), which include good stuff like this:

Picture 1

And for “Earth and human activity” (including climate change):

Picture 3Of course, Kentucky being where it is, its good citizens (I use that term loosely) aren’t going to let this rest, and, according to Cincinnati.com, a hearing in Frankfort, Kentucky brought out all the yahoos, and it was quite a fracas:

Supporters and critics of Kentucky’s new science education standards clashed over evolution and climate change Tuesday amid a high-stakes debate on overhauling academic content in public schools.

Opponents ridiculed the new standards as “fascist” and “atheistic” and said they promoted thinking that leads to “genocide” and “murder.”

Supporters said the education changes are vital if Kentucky is to keep pace with other states and allow students to prepare for college and careers.

Nearly two dozen parents, teachers, scientists and advocacy groups commented at a state Department of Education hearing on the Next Generation Science Standards — a broad set of guidelines that will revamp content in grades K-12 and help meet requirements from a 2009 law that called for improving education.

On the pro side, a few scientists spoke:

“Students in the commonwealth both need and deserve 21st-century science education grounded in inquiry, rich in content and internationally benchmarked,” said Blaine Ferrell, a representative from the Kentucky Academy of Sciences, a science advocacy group that endorses the standards.

Dave Robinson, a biology professor at Bellarmine University, said neighboring states have been more successful in recruiting biotechnology companies, and Kentucky could get left behind in industrial development if students fail to learn the latest scientific concepts.

But they were outnumbered by outraged parents opposed to the “fascistic and atheistic standards” (how could a good science standard be anything but atheistic, at least in terms of leaving out God?). Read and weep. I’ve put these in bold; they’d be funny if they weren’t so crazy and sad:

But the majority of comments during the two-hour hearing came from critics who questioned the validity of evolution and climate change and railed against the standards as a threat to religious liberty, at times drawing comparisons to Soviet-style communism.

One parent, Valerie O’Rear, said the standards promote an “atheistic world view” and a political agenda that pushes government control.

Matt Singleton, a Baptist minister in Louisville who runs an Internet talk-radio program, called teachings on evolution a lie that has led to drug abuse, suicide and other social afflictions.

“Outsiders are telling public school families that we must follow the rich man’s elitist religion of evolution, that we no longer have what the Kentucky Constitution says is the right to worship almighty God,” Singleton said. “Instead, this fascist method teaches that our children are the property of the state.”

At one point, opponent Dena Stewart-Gore of Louisville also suggested that the standards will marginalize students with religious beliefs, leading to ridicule and physiological harm in the classroom, and create difficulties for students with learning disabilities.“The way socialism works is it takes anybody that doesn’t fit the mold and discards them,” she said, adding that “we are even talking genocide and murder here, folks.”

These statements are beyond belief. Communism? Atheistic world view? Evolution as a cause of suicide and drug abuse? Physiological harm to students? Evolution as a “rich man’s elitist religion”?  And yes, children are property of the state when it comes to how they’re taught science in public schools.  Can you imagine the result if the parents of Kentucky voted on the school currriculum? It would be back to flood geology!

These standards still need to be approved by the school board, and then forwarded to the legislature for approval.  In the meantime, the people of Kentucky should grow up and accept the facts.

h/t: Ant

135 Comments

  1. Sarah
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:20 am | Permalink

    “Right here in River City!”

    • Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:49 am | Permalink

      “Trouble … With a capital ‘T’ / That rhymes with ‘E’ / And that stands for ‘evolution’!”

      /@

      • Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:19 am | Permalink

        🙂 Am putting the lid on posting either clips of the credulous crowd in The Music Man or various renditions of Dueling Banjos out of respect for our beleaguered Kentuckian commenters.

        • Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:31 am | Permalink

          “Seventy-six dinosaur bones in the big parade… ”

          /@

          • Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:03 am | Permalink

            The religious method of simply deciding what’s true closely resembles the Think Method of simply deciding you can play a trumpet.

  2. Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:21 am | Permalink

    This does not promise much for the future of the USA, if many people are outraged by reasonable educational standards. The single most important threat for the future of America is it’s own domestic anti-science movement.

  3. gbjames
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:21 am | Permalink

    sub

  4. Wild Juggler
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:26 am | Permalink

    This “rich man’s elitist religion” is a new one, I don’t think I’ve heard evolution described like this before.

    Too funny!

    • Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:51 am | Permalink

      Yeah, I particularly liked that…

      /@

    • Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:06 am | Permalink

      Me, neither.

      I’d like to know the train of thought that led him to seeing evolution as a belief held by a financial elite. Isn’t this at odds with the very next claim that evolution and socialism are perfect bedfellows?

      If anything (and making no pretense to having actual data), I’d guess there’s a much stronger correlation between being in the financial elite and being a religious, god-and-country type.

      • Diana MacPherson
        Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:19 am | Permalink

        That’s because you’re discerning the actual meaning of the words and arranging them in logical order according to grammatical rules.

        To understand the speaker, you have to throw logic out the window and think of what the words represent — to these people, saying these words is tantamount to swearing for us. Instead of using scatological or sexual references, they use ideological words taken out of context & misunderstood.

        So what this person is saying is “I don’t like intellectuals. Education is bad because I don’t understand it and it uses words and math”. 🙂

        • Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:26 am | Permalink

          I won’t dismiss the possibility that he has some rationale, however wrong it may be.

          But you’re probably correct. I guess the “rich” part would be rooted in jealousy?

          • Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:22 am | Permalink

            Diana’s correct. These people use words like “socialist” and “fascist” with absolutely no understanding of their actual meanings. They only know that they are bad things, and they believe that “liberals” are in favor of them because “liberals” hate freedom. It’s really discouraging, and of course the only solution is better education, which they fight because too much book learning is bad for soul…or something.

            • Diana MacPherson
              Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:25 am | Permalink

              Too bad we can’t trick them into education. I think a charismatic person could – infiltrate their groups and educate them. 🙂

              • darrelle
                Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:29 am | Permalink

                That might work, but I think much of the problem in the first place is susceptibility to charisma. As is well known even well educated people can believe the most ridiculous things that they seemingly should know better than to believe. I think susceptibility to charisma is one of the things that enables that.

                Or to rephrase, predisposed to behave as if charisma and at least a pretense of authority are sufficient reason to follow the lead of a charismatic authority figure.

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:07 am | Permalink

                Exactly why my cunning plan would work! Muhahahaha!

          • Diana MacPherson
            Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:28 am | Permalink

            I think rich = educated = arrogant in their minds. There is probably some jealousy involved but it’s all part of anti-intellectualism and probably a bit of seeing themselves as victims and blaming others.

            • Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:06 am | Permalink

              But then I wonder what he’d say about the Koch brothers.

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:10 am | Permalink

                Probably they’d see them as capitalist & therefore good. They don’t have logic in their decisions.

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:10 am | Permalink

                Probably they’d see them as capitalist & therefore good. They don’t have logic in their decisions.

        • Old Rasputin
          Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:52 pm | Permalink

          Ha, I read your initial sentence –

          “That’s because you’re discerning the actual meaning of the words and arranging them in logical order according to grammatical rules.”

          – and thought you were just being sarcastic/snarky, but I think your comment really does a superb job of describing how such people are actually using language.

          • Diana MacPherson
            Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:01 pm | Permalink

            Thanks – I saved up the snark for the end of the post instead. 🙂

  5. darrelle
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:28 am | Permalink

    I agree with them in one respect. The requirements are in a sense “atheistic.” But there is just no getting around that since reality has a distinct “atheistic” bias.

    • Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:32 am | Permalink

      Indeed, what role does god play in learning skills such as driving? None. Therefore driving schools are atheistic, but has anyone ever complained about this fact?

      • Brygida Berse
        Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:46 am | Permalink

        what role does god play in learning skills such as driving?

        If I am to believe bumper stickers, many people have God as their co-pilot.

        • Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:56 am | Permalink

          They’re in the wrong kind of vehicle then…

          /@

        • Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:03 am | Permalink

          Well, in that case god should be hold liable when such car is engaged in causing a crash.

        • darrelle
          Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:31 am | Permalink

          Oh shit! You just loosed the “Jesus Take the Wheel” ear worm.

          I loathe that song.

          Since I first heard I can’t even look at Carrie Underwood anymore.

        • lulu_footloose
          Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:47 am | Permalink

          Your comment reminded me of this

          http://cupofzup.com/tag/jesus-take-the-wheel/

      • Graham
        Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:36 am | Permalink

        Driving schools teach the rich man’s elitist idea that everyone has to drive on the same side of the road. What happened to freedom of choice? God help those of us who want to march to a different drum. Definitely a socialist conspiracy (a rich man’s socialist conspiracy) to ensure conformity and the death of the individual.

      • Posted July 26, 2013 at 10:36 pm | Permalink

        There are a lot of areas where god doesn’t even make an appearance. In math class, there is no time when 2+2=4 need one to hypothesize a god to make it so!

    • jesperbothpedersen1
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:33 am | Permalink

      Screw reality. Reality must be wrong. It says so in this book I’ve read. Books trumps reality.

      Hallelujah.

      • Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:58 am | Permalink

        Really?

        /@

        • jesperbothpedersen1
          Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:00 am | Permalink

          You better believe it. The bible says so.

          • Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:06 am | Permalink

            Well, my “holly” book says that the bible is wrong either; instead aliens from deep space have created man 25,000 years ago (or something like that).

            • jesperbothpedersen1
              Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:30 am | Permalink

              Blasphemy!

    • Notagod
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:49 am | Permalink

      It’s actually the other way around. Evolution and other natural events happen regardless of any human construct. Atheistic views simply are aligned with natural events. Christians could do the same except that they are bound to jebus sticks and holey bibs which are wholly unreal.

  6. jesperbothpedersen1
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:30 am | Permalink

    “Opponents ridiculed the new standards as “fascist” and “atheistic” and said they promoted thinking that leads to “genocide” and “murder.””

    Of course it does. I can’t wait until the new atheistic world order is in power, so the genocide can begin.

    All hail Atheismo, the new God of Man.

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:50 am | Permalink

      You mean the new soviet, fascist, socialist world order! I can’t wait either! It’s already begun because atheists have been killing angels to make the transition that much easier for believers.

      • jesperbothpedersen1
        Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:59 am | Permalink

        It’s gonna be great. I can’t wait to try out some of the new baby-recepies I’ve been working on.

      • Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:20 am | Permalink

        Clearly, there is no limit to human stupidity.

        /@

    • Graham
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:47 am | Permalink

      Ah yes, genocide. How about killing every living thing on the planet apart from a few we’ll save and stuff into a big boat which we can… oh, wait- that one’s already been done. Not sure how us atheists could top that one really. Kind of wins the gold medal on the genocide front.

      • darrelle
        Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:39 am | Permalink

        Not to mention the various tribes that their god used them to extinguish from existence. Oh, except for the little girls of course.

        Projection. It is really interesting how christians so frequently accuse others of heinous behaviors, with the intent to be demeaning, which they themselves or their ilk, according to the historical record and or their own holy writings, are guilty of.

  7. NewEnglandBob
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:34 am | Permalink

    The religious mind is poisoned and the sheep listen to their control handlers. This is just normal for this and other Bible Belt states.

    We will see if reasonable standards get approved or whether it gets settled by law suits, if not.

    They do have an option of staying uneducable and unable to compete. I just hope the residents realize they can leave the state for civilized, educated society.

    • Larry Gay
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:14 am | Permalink

      There has been an exodus of talent from the midwest for some time. Better students leave for better colleges and better job opportunities on the coasts. In the old days with heavy industry in the middle of the country there was a need for skilled technicians and engineers with some higher education. That seems to be changing. Perhaps the middle of the country should do what it does best — raise corn and hogs and forget about competing in the high-tech world.

      • Robert Bray
        Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:57 am | Permalink

        I don’t think of Kentucky as part of the ‘midwest’ or in the ‘middle of the country.’ Rather, it is a state in the upland South, having been largely populated by large numbers of poor whites from Virginia and the Carolinas, along with a few gentry and their many slaves. ‘Mountain folk,’ as they like to think of themselves (even as the mountains level to hillocks as one moves westward through Kentucky), are culturally insular. Their lives over generations have been dominated by an especially intense mode of Protestant Christianity, by ‘clanism’ (yes, sometimes Klanism) and by racial hatred of emancipated African-Americans. While the upland southern culture has produced some beautiful things–I’ll mention only Sacred Harp singing, Bourbon and thoroughbred horses–it is among the most anti-intellectual of United States sub-cultures, which is saying a lot given our overall anti-
        intellectualism as a nation.

        • darrelle
          Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:08 am | Permalink

          You paint a grim picture.

        • Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:06 am | Permalink

          “Sacred Harp singing”
          Southern Harmony to be precise, with the Denson “red book” Sacred Harp being a relative newcomer (1990s). I haven’t been to the traditional Southern Harmony singing in Benton, but the Harrods Creek convention (third weekend in April) uses both books and is excellent.

          To those not familiar with shapenote singing: This is an American Protestant frontier folk hymn tradition. It is so far removed from mainline Christian church that there are actually atheist-appropriate songs, and atheist singers, though I doubt that either one was part of the original intent!

          • RFW
            Posted July 26, 2013 at 10:28 am | Permalink

            I’ve got a CD somewhere of a recording by (iirc) Alan Lomax of an Alabama Sacred Harp convention. The singing on it is atrocious, beyond bad.

            Done by trained singers, the Sacred Harp music is really quite beautiful, but those Alabama hillbillies are apparently unable even to grasp the principles of Sacred Harp notation, intended to make singing easier for the musically ignorant.

        • Larry Gay
          Posted July 26, 2013 at 12:29 pm | Permalink

          I defer to your view of Kentucky. Let them do what they do best — make bourbon for the rest of us liberal pointy-headed elite snobs. Incidentally, I’ve been reading a lot of Nazi propaganda lately. “Liberal” was one of their favorite slur words.

  8. Alex Shuffell
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:35 am | Permalink

    Wow, these people are really against allowing their children an education.

  9. Diana MacPherson
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:46 am | Permalink

    If the second half of this post hadn’t included the report about the ignorant parents, I would have mocked Indiana for their incessant mocking of Kentucky. But ouch, Kentucky does seem to have some issues to deal with!

    What the heck happened to these parents? Were education standards so low when they were educated? I’m thinking they must be around my age and I remember things weren’t so bad education wise then but maybe it was different in Kentucky.

    I’ve seen this same rabid, ignorant behaviour many times locally over WiFi in schools. Usually the parents express hysterical outrage that their kids are being harmed and they either cite or trot out some doofus with an unrelated degree and then they make unfounded but emotional claims. It’s so hard to fight emotion with logic because people like these don’t value logic. It’s why they make such non sensical claims in the first place; one of my favourite from this post is”
    The way socialism works is it takes anybody that doesn’t fit the mold and discards them” Oh dear. There’s the scary word, “socialism” again and there it is all muddled up with tyranny & genocide. The Dunning-Kruger Effect is strong in this one. You know you’re going to have a hard time communicating using reason when you see this.

    It is heartening to see that the school standards are excellent right now. I really hope these loud mouths are just that – loud and that’s all.

  10. Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:48 am | Permalink

    Cut off all they’re electric, cell phones, television, radio, medical and any other modern conveniences from science and see how they react. They can pray.

    • darrelle
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:34 am | Permalink

      The problem though is that they often prey as well. Especially on the young ones.

  11. Lurker111
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:51 am | Permalink

    New rule: If you can’t define Fascism, you can’t use the term.

    • Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:07 am | Permalink

      I am using that rule for many years already.

    • Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:12 am | Permalink

      Implementing this rule for words in general will seriously limit what these types of people will be able to say.

      This is not an argument against implementation.

  12. @eightyc
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:53 am | Permalink

    lol.

    Well Christianity taught in school is quite “atheistic” against Thor!!!

    How dare them! lol

    • Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:59 am | Permalink

      That would be “athoristic,” and that’s okay.

  13. Róbert Konček
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:12 am | Permalink

    Just a little reminder. Ken Ham’s inglorious Creation Museum is situated near Petersburg, Kentucky and Answers in Genesis has its headquarters in Hebron, Kentucky.

  14. Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:15 am | Permalink

    I’ve always suspected the Standard Model of particle physics was just another form of authoritarian nationalism with an emphasis on secular syndicalism. Thank you Kentucky.

    • Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:59 am | Permalink

      Remember, Catholics* can’t have mass without the Higgs boson… 

      /@

      * Unless they’re composed entirely of neutrinos.

  15. Kurt Helf
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:19 am | Permalink

    Yes, these people are yahoos but they’re also victims. This kind of long-term, intergenerational poisoning of minds is just one more pernicious effect of religion and one more reason to abjure it in all its forms.

  16. darrelle
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:22 am | Permalink

    Okay, now that I have actually read the whole thing . . .

    #@#%!! me, but Christopher Hitchens was right. Religion really does poison everything.

    When exposed to this level of poisonous ignorance I just don’t see any hope of rehabilitating people like that. It might be best to just let them have it their way and leave them behind. Except for their children, of course, which is what this is all about.

    I am so tired of the old trope that everyone deserves respect. Perhaps, but certainly not equal respect. The only respect these people deserve from me is the very basic respect of the minimum rights a decent society needs its members to afford each other. Such people have earned nothing more from me.

    I owe them no courtesy. They certainly are showing no respect for my views and, additionally, their views are detrimental to society. My responsibility to my society far outweighs any responsibility to offer respect to these people, and demands that I oppose their views with scorn, ridicule and reason.

    • NewEnglandBob
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:26 am | Permalink

      They deserve respect as people. They should be treated as equals, that’s all. Their ideas deserve no respect, other than hearing them out. Ridicule and condemnation for their ideas and thoughts are well deserved.

      • darrelle
        Posted July 26, 2013 at 6:36 am | Permalink

        “The only respect these people deserve from me is the very basic respect of the minimum rights a decent society needs its members to afford each other.

  17. lulu_footloose
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:22 am | Permalink

    After reading the comments from the “concerned parents”, I face-palmed so hard that my face transferred to my hand!

  18. Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:31 am | Permalink

    Reblogged this on A Tale Unfolds and commented:
    This is a post all normal people and those of a religious persuasion ought to read. And bear in mind this is the same nation that out a Man on the Moon.
    Read it and realise why religion needs to be shown the door….now.

  19. DV
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:52 am | Permalink

    The parable about the cripple and his crutches seems appropriate here.

  20. MAUCH
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 7:54 am | Permalink

    If the opponents feel that it is only fair to offer a scientific alternative to the “athiestic teachings” currently being offered then what exactly are they calling for? It sounds suspiciously the alternative to atheism is theism. Just because religion is myth it does not mean that facts are athiestic.

    • DV
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:09 am | Permalink

      >>Just because religion is myth it does not mean that facts are athiestic.

      Oh yes it does. No need to sugarcoat it.

  21. Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:09 am | Permalink

    Lo, how the mighty have fallen… from Jacoby’s Freethinkers:

    Nowhere was the influence of Jefferson greater than in Kentucky, which in 1792 became the fifteenth state to enter the union. As in Virginia, evangelicals and secularists combined to form a majority in favor of religious liberty and separation of church and state. Between 1789 and 1792, South Carolina and Georgia also followed the Virginia model and removed all religious barriers from their constitutions.</

    On a pre-civil war kerfuffle involving a Congressional uprising against the “secular” postal service:

    the lawmakers referred this godly mess to the powerful Senate Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads. The committee chairman was Senator Richard M. Johnson of Kentucky, a general, a hero of the War of 1812, and a devout Baptist—but in the dissident evangelical tradition that had supported the framing of a federal constitution with no mention of God.

    She also mentions freethought periodicals proliferating after the Civil War, including the Blue Grass Blade in Lexington, Kentucky.

    • Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:10 am | Permalink

      rat-crap on the blockquote fail… but you get the idea.

      • jesperbothpedersen1
        Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:21 am | Permalink

        Speaking of blockquote, is there a formatting helper anywhere on this site?

        I haven’t got the faintest clue about how to quote, italics or bold…etc etc.

        An overview of the formatting would be nice. 🙂

        • darrelle
          Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:50 am | Permalink

          (blockquote)text(/blockquote) = blocked quote

          (i)text(/i) = italics

          (b)text(/b) = bold

          (a href=”web address” rel=”nofollow”)text you wish link to appear as(/a) = embedded link appearing as whatever text you specify. Pay particular attention to spaces in that one.

          In all cases “(” should be replaced with a “less than” symbol and “)” should be replaced with a “greater than” symbol.

          • Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:55 am | Permalink

            Thanks for the rel=”nofollow”. I just learned something new.

            • Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:36 am | Permalink

              Me too!

              Important not to improve the page ranking of creationist &c. websites!

              /@

          • jesperbothpedersen1
            Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:17 am | Permalink

            Thanks a bunch, darelle.

            • darrelle
              Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:23 am | Permalink

              Any time!

        • Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:51 am | Permalink

          I found this just now: http://en.support.wordpress.com/code/#html-tags

          I’ve grown accustomed to having to use the “a” construction for Youtube posts, or WordPress embeds them automatically. (“a” construction is [ a href=”url” ‘text that diplays’ /a ] with the brackets properly around the tags. Pain in the butt, but a good trick to know.

          The other stuff is pretty standard html (bold, italics, blockquote, etc… again a pain until one figures out tagging basics.

          • jesperbothpedersen1
            Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:23 am | Permalink

            Yay!,thank you, Anonypuss. That page is just what I was looking for. 🙂

            • Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:39 am | Permalink

              Not all of those tags are supported in comments.

              /@

              • jesperbothpedersen1
                Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:44 am | Permalink

                Got it.

                Some of them have been disabled due to security reasons.

              • Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:47 am | Permalink

                I see. The plot thickens.

                So allowed tags seem to be attached to a site-owner’s theme… the underlying php. Perhaps there’s a more user-friendly interface for site authors, I dunno. Haven’t played with WordPress enough to know (yet).

          • Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:51 am | Permalink

            Hmm…that says image tags are allowed, but I seem to remember they don’t work.

            Let’s see:

            b&

            • Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:52 am | Permalink

              Nope. Ah, well….

              b&

              • Posted July 26, 2013 at 10:11 am | Permalink

                Someone managed to post an image in a thread the other day. I meant to peek at the HTML to see how… :-/

                /@

              • Posted July 26, 2013 at 10:16 am | Permalink

                test

                A cheeky macaque, Lower Kintaganban River, Borneo. Original by Richard Clark

                /test

              • Posted July 26, 2013 at 10:16 am | Permalink

                FAIL

              • Posted July 26, 2013 at 10:17 am | Permalink

                test

                /test

              • Posted July 26, 2013 at 10:18 am | Permalink

                FAIL

                (At least now you can see the cheeky macaque by following the link.)

              • Posted July 26, 2013 at 1:12 pm | Permalink

                Is “cheeky macaque” a stripper stage name, or is my mind the only one in the gutter?

                b&

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted July 26, 2013 at 1:14 pm | Permalink

                That would have to be a male stripper, Ben.

              • gbjames
                Posted July 26, 2013 at 1:28 pm | Permalink

                Could be one of Anthony Weiner’s alternate identities.

              • jesperbothpedersen1
                Posted July 26, 2013 at 1:37 pm | Permalink

                I’m pretty sure he’s locked on Carlos Danger.

              • Diana MacPherson
                Posted July 26, 2013 at 2:09 pm | Permalink

                Awww poor Anthony Weiner! Perhaps if he knew about diphthongs his name would be less unfortunate in relation his indiscretions. I’m also aware that diphthongs in the context of Anthony Weiner sound salacious.

              • Posted July 26, 2013 at 2:23 pm | Permalink

                At this point, boiled cabbage in the context of Anthony Weiner sounds salacious….

                b&

              • jesperbothpedersen1
                Posted July 26, 2013 at 2:26 pm | Permalink

                The Weiner is a dead giveaway.

                The Daily Show’s had a hilarious report on it.

                (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C5wlK9pWRlo)

            • Posted July 26, 2013 at 10:06 am | Permalink

              I notice this site is based on the “sandbox” theme, which I downloaded and checked out. I was unable to decipher what tags are allowed in a cursory look at the php files (assuming there has been little modification done by either Jerry or his helpers). I have a crushing workload at the moment… but including the code in that other link I gave – in the functions.php, would go a long way towards showing everybody what is and is not allowed, in the web page itself, next to the comment buttons.

            • Posted July 26, 2013 at 10:08 am | Permalink

              relevant info is in “the plot thickens” linky above. perhaps a kindly soul could coordinate with our kindly host to modify the sandbox theme?

    • Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:41 am | Permalink

      I recall. In writing about The Blue Grass Blade, Jacoby mistakenly makes Lexington the state capitol (it’s Frankfort)… a rare error in her eyeopening book.

    • Diane G.
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 10:55 pm | Permalink

      I well remember learning about the late 19th century flowering of freethought in my high school history course in the mid-to-late 60’s. I’ll bet the subject’s no longer in today’s texts.

      People who assume that yesterday’s society was much more benighted than today’s don’t know their history. Heck, you don’t have to go back that far to find encouraging progressive secularism; the 1960’s/70’s themselves were a much more enlightened era in the States than the oligarchy we’ve had for the past few decades or so.

  22. William
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:12 am | Permalink

    This sort of thing is what gets me the most. They’re so afraid of someone telling them that they’re wrong, of someone telling them how to think and what to believe; because that would get in their way of telling people what to think, what to believe and hinder them from ostracizing those who see the world differently than they do.

    That, and of course the obvious issue with their faith. If they’re so afraid that exposure to science will wreck their children’s faith, then isnt that an indication how weak their “very clear truths in Christ” really are if they can be toppled so easily?

    • NewEnglandBob
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:33 am | Permalink

      Well, you go using reason, logic and common sense – you are confusing them with those are foreign concepts.

    • RFW
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 10:34 am | Permalink

      IMO, the intensity of the reaction of fundagelicals to proper science education is a sure sign that in their hearts they know their religion is bullshit.

      But, yes, religion does seem to develop a death grip on its dupes’ powers of critical thinking. Too bad no combination of psychologists and marketing experts haven’t come up with a sure-fire way to pry open fundagelical shells and lead them to think “maybe this stuff they say in church really is bullshit”.

  23. Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:18 am | Permalink

    I would like to know how teaching evolution creates difficulties for students with learning disabilities. I work in the special education department at the local junior high and not a single student there would have a problem learning about evolution.

    • microraptor
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:47 am | Permalink

      They probably think that teaching evolution means we need to start purging the students with learning disabilities. Or giving the students with learning disabilities actual accommodations to help them learn instead of just praying that they’ll do better. Or something.

  24. Brian
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:43 am | Permalink

    I was heartened by this at first, even through the ignorance. However, the last paragraph killed it. Granted, I know very little about the Kentucky legislature, but my faith in politicians and their grasp of science is practically nonexistent.

  25. Posted July 26, 2013 at 8:50 am | Permalink

    Unfortunately, there is no shortage of right wing belly-crawling politicians who either agree with these people, or are happy to pander to them. It’s even worse in Louisiana, where the argument over science standards (currently DI approved) has been superseded by the effort of our governor (along with the head of the Dept. of Education) to abolish public education altogether.

  26. Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:27 am | Permalink

    I think my perspective on this one is a bit different from most…

    I lived in KY for nine years, went to grad school there, and taught introductory college geology labs for four years. The state does have many disturbing problems, mostly rooted in willful ignorance.

    But since the early 1990s, KY has been making an effort to improve its public schools and reduce the number of illiterate adults, and they are making progress. (I worked with a group of a dozen fourth-grade girl scouts in 1996; they were articulate, eager to learn, and could all read at grade level, though their mothers were illiterate.)

    It’s very encouraging to see that the state has taken the time to formulate and propose science standards! The fact that the protesters resorted to such ridiculous extreme statements suggests to me that the Christians no longer have as strong a hold on the state’s culture as they used to, and science education MAY soon have a fighting chance.

    • Kurt Helf
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 3:27 pm | Permalink

      I’ve lived in South Central KY since 2001 and my children basically grew up here. Teachers in the public schools they’ve attended, AFAIK, have never injected religion into any of their science classes. Being a professional scientist I’ve paid very specific attention as to how they’ve been taught the scientific method and have been quite satisfied thus far.

  27. Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:37 am | Permalink

    Terrifying

  28. jesperbothpedersen1
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:53 am | Permalink

    The fact that the protesters resorted to such ridiculous extreme statements suggests to me that the Christians no longer have as strong a hold on the state’s culture as they used to, and science education MAY soon have a fighting chance.

    One can only hope.

  29. krzysztof1
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 9:55 am | Permalink

    Those are excellent standards. I see no direct reference to marginalizing religious students in them. I hope that when the “yahoos” raise these “issues” the board will hold their feet to the fire and ask them to produce “evidence” of their absurd claims. They don’t have any! They also gas on about “state control” while completely ignoring the fact that religion itself is mind-control!

    • microraptor
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 1:09 pm | Permalink

      It’s because religion hates competition.

      Especially from reality.

  30. IconoclastIcon
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 11:37 am | Permalink

    Being a Kentuckian (born, raised, and still residing), it’s embarrassing that this is still an issue in the 21st century. I’ve been a cognizant atheist and proponent of science for well over 20 years; so we’re not all ass-backwards.

  31. Richard Olson
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 1:20 pm | Permalink

    ‘… leading to ridicule and physiological harm in the classroom …’ — Dena-Gore

    Perhaps this lady actually wanted to say “physical” harm in some imminent instant (and I have no idea how teaching either evolution or climate science in a classroom could result in this outcome), instead of accidentally brain-farting the word “physiological”, instead.

    Or, she possibly believes merely discussing the possibility of evolutionary processes in a classroom filled with students will, in due time, result in physical changes to one or more of these innocents. Which would have to be an example of evolution at work, and creates a hole to talk her way out of. Bet she wishes she could take her statement back now.

    • Diana MacPherson
      Posted July 26, 2013 at 1:23 pm | Permalink

      I paused at physiological as well and wondered if she meant psychological.

      • Diane G.
        Posted July 26, 2013 at 10:58 pm | Permalink

        I’m sure that’s the case.

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted July 27, 2013 at 7:37 pm | Permalink

        I suspected a substitution of “physio-” for “psycholo-” too, but purely on the expectation that such a bunch of Yahoos probably don’t know the difference. Figuratively or literally, to use another common confused pair.

  32. tombesson
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 2:00 pm | Permalink

    Proof positive that dinosaurs breeding with humans leads to no good.

    • Posted July 26, 2013 at 2:08 pm | Permalink

      Indeed. According to Pat Roberson, that leads to gay marriage, which in turn probably causes hurricanes — and we all know that hurricanes cause dark-skinned nations to enter into trade agreements with Jesus’s brother….

      b&

  33. Erik Verbruggen
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 2:20 pm | Permalink

    This post definitely indicates that they are getting nervous….. but I must say that I find the guidelines set out rather dogmatic and biased. It appears as a distrust of either the teachers or the evidence itself…. I think this is wrong

  34. Posted July 26, 2013 at 3:01 pm | Permalink

    That sure must be some powerful god that needs people like that to do his/her/its boxing for him/her/it.

  35. Posted July 26, 2013 at 3:06 pm | Permalink

    That sure must be some amazing god if it needs people like that to do his/her/its boxing for it.

    • Posted July 26, 2013 at 3:08 pm | Permalink

      Oops, sorry, I forgot to refresh the page and thought my comment didn’t register.

  36. Jonathan Houser
    Posted July 26, 2013 at 5:53 pm | Permalink

    I am a Kentucky resident and an Electrical Engineering student and I apologize for my state. There are bastions of sanity here, but so much of the state is rural church lovin’ evangelists, and they all come screaming out of the woodwork as if we are murdering their pets when the sane people try to do anything. Terribly sorry about that.

  37. lanceleuven
    Posted July 27, 2013 at 12:23 am | Permalink

    “leading to ridicule and physiological harm in the classroom, and create difficulties for students with learning disabilities.“The way socialism works is it takes anybody that doesn’t fit the mold and discards them,” she said, adding that “we are even talking genocide and murder here, folks.””

    Ummm…ma’am, have you ever tried listening to the words that actually come out of your mouth? It might be worth giving it a try, at least just once.

  38. Muu Puklip
    Posted July 27, 2013 at 9:55 am | Permalink

    The religious mindset of those anti-evolution Kentuckians is fascinating. The use of wild emotional attacks made up of cobbled together non sequiturs is probably much the same mental process as generated the hysterical (fearful) accusations that were thrown around in Salem in the 1690s.

    Perhaps it is time to use parts of their own mindset to calm them down and get them to the point where they can let their children progress through education. “Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour” might be a good starting point.


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