Category Archives: history of science

Francis Crick hosts a groovy party

by Matthew Cobb As regular readers will know, Jerry and I are finishing up our books at the same time. His is The Albatross, mine has a name and a topic ‘Life’s Greatest Secret: The Race to Crack the Genetic Code’. I hope to press ‘send’ to my publishers tomorrow morning. [JAC: Mine is hard on […]

Rembrandt and anatomy

by Matthew Cobb A few days ago (at Jerry’s suggestion!) I highlighted my imminent appearance on Adam Rutherford’s BBC TV series ‘Beauty of Anatomy’, in the episode on Rembrandt. Someone has now uploaded that episode onto YouTube. Watch the episode – not for me, but for Rembrandt and Ruysch, and for Rutherford, who is excellent […]

Rutherford (and Cobb) on Rembrandt

by Matthew Cobb UK readers might want to watch the third episode of Adam Rutherford’s new BBC TV series, The Beauty of Anatomy, which is on tonight, Wednesday 27th, at 20:30 on BBC4 (I’m afraid it clashes with the Great British Bakeoff if you’re into that). Adam’s 5-part series traces the history of anatomy through […]

Tw**ets from Darwin and the Beagle: the Great Man envies kittens

Darwin had both cats and d*gs, but it’s clear that he loved his d*gs more. I’ll forgive him for that; after all, he wrote the best science book ever, and that outweighs a lot of flaws.  In fact, I don’t think The Origin even mentions cats, though I recall that it has a few words […]

A peeved believer argues that science arose from Christianity

Yesterday reader “Py” wrote in trying to add a comment to an old post, “Did Christianity (and other religions) promote the rise of science?” Here’s the comment: I say without Christianity, there’ll be no modern science. An incomplete list of Christian Scientists (i’ve got a link to 80+ more, all YECs) vs. An incomplete list of […]

Must we study history to understand science?

I am a big fan of the history of science—not because it’s helped me do better science (though some of my research, including that on “Haldane’s Rule,” derived from papers that were largely forgotten).  I think that it’s interesting to understand the history of one’s discipline, but not essential for practicing good science. Alejandra Dubcovsky, […]

The kids who drew on the manuscript of On The Origin of Species

by Matthew Cobb PhD student Benjamin Breen at the University of Texas at Austin has posted this treasure trove at The Appendix. Maybe you all know about it, but I didn’t, and neither did Professor Ceiling Cat. (It was originally published by The Daily Telegraph in 2009, to coincide with an exhibition at Cambridge University […]

Darwin’s pet tortoise

by Greg Mayer (addendum below) Darwin lived in the country, and had many animals– for companionship, work, and research. For companions, his chief pets were d*gs (my favorite of Darwin’s d*gs was Bob), but he also had a tortoise that he brought home from James (Santiago) Island in the Galapagos. It has been claimed (most […]

Why John Scopes wasn’t a racist, and other lessons from the “Monkey Trial”

This is a lesson in the history of biology—not from me, but for me. A while back I visited John Scopes’s grave in Paducah, Kentucky and praised him, saying that I would have liked to shake his hand (I discovered that he didn’t die until I was 20). Well, that statement and the picture of […]

More good things by Wallace

by Greg Mayer We’ve already posted some things to read by and about Alfred Russel Wallace in honor of Wallace Year, including a list by me and a recent list by fellow Wallace-ophile Andrew Berry. There’s another item that I can recommend to WEIT readers, which I had known about and forgotten to mention, but […]

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