Category Archives: Accommodationism

Jesus ‘n’ Mo ‘n’ Moses ‘n’ Templeton

I may have published this before, as it’s an oldie (but a goodie). And the Jesus and Mo artist republished this classic today. From Templeton’s site: The Templeton Prize is the equivalent of  $1.8 million (US), while the Nobel Prize (which can be divided three ways) is the equivalent of $1.2 million dollars.  The Templeton […]

Fulsome accommodationism at the AAAS meeting

This video really makes me queasy, for it’s made and partially funded by America’s largest association of scientists, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, or AAAS. And that organization has an official program to reconcile science and religion, the “Dialogue on Science, Ethics, and Religion,” also called the DoSER program (information here). DoSER […]

Elaine Ecklund is still pretending that science and religion are compatible

For years, sociologist Elaine Ecklund has made a career at Rice University by surveying religionists, scientists, and religious scientists, and twisting her survey data to show that science and religion are compatible. Science are “spiritual,” she says, and there are surprisingly more religious scientists than we think. (Go here to see the many posts I’ve […]

Why religion can be rational, but is doing it wrong

For part of the book I’m writing, I’m investigating the claim—one made by theologians and religious apologists—that science in fact was an outgrowth of Christianity, explaining the rise of science in Europe and nowhere else. (Yes, yes, I know about China and the Middle East, but their science fizzled out.) One of the most vociferous […]

Dumb article of the month: Scotsman suggests new path of accommodation

By “Scotsman” here, I mean not only the newspaper in which this mushbrained article appeared yesterday, but also its author, Peter Kearney, director of the Scottish Catholic Media Office. The piece, “Science and religion can be compatible,” floats a twisted form of “compatibility” which isn’t compatible at all.  The thesis is simply this: science doesn’t […]

Adam Gopnik on atheism in the New Yorker

I consider Adam Gopnik a friend, as we have occasional email exchanges about the things that matter (e.g., food, atheism, and “other ways of knowing”), and I’ve taken him to my favorite Hunanese restaurant in Chicago. And of course I admire his writing: his book Paris to the Moon, for instance, is a witty and […]

Creation/evolution documentary airs tonight on U.S. television

Reader Joyce called my attention to Neil Genzlinger’s review in the New York Times  of a t.v. show that will be shown tonight on HBO (Home Box Office). I present the review in its bizarre entirety: “Questioning Darwin,” a documentary on Monday night on HBO, starts out with a refreshingly unusual approach to a polarizing subject, then […]

Debate postmortem III: BioLogos weighs in, but not helpfully

The people at BioLogos have weighed in with a group reaction to the Ham/Nye debate on evolution. “Ham on Nye: Our take,” which gives the separate reactions of six associates. BioLogos has always fascinated me because it’s an organization that has immense potential for cognitive dissonance. While dedicated to helping evangelical Christians accept evolution—an admirable […]

Gag me with a spoon

If you want accommodationism so unctuous that you’ll want either an immediate shower or a dose of syrup of ipecac, have a listen to “Lookout, Science” by Erin Hill and her psychedelic harp. I wish I could say that this is a joke. It isn’t. Watch it—as a favor to Professor Ceiling Cat. It’s NOMA […]

One minute and forty seconds of accommodationist fail

The video below was posted by, of all venues, the World Science Festival. It’s run by physicist Brian Greene and his spouse Tracy Day, but of course it’s partly funded by the Templeton Foundation. And because of that Templeton dosh, they always include a completely irrelevant, non-sciencey but accommodationist event, just to let people know […]

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