Mother Teresa paper online (in French)

Earlier today I wrote about a new paper from two researchers at the University of Montreal that critically examines the work of Mother Teresa. The paper is now free online here. It’s in French, so if a French-speaking reader wants to do everyone a huge favor, it needs translation into English.  The first author has let me know that he’d appreciate having the paper translated into English, and would like a copy if that was done. As far as I know, no English translation is in the works.

Here’s a screenshot:Picture 1

37 Comments

  1. @eightyc
    Posted March 5, 2013 at 12:35 pm | Permalink

    lol.

    Well I only know Grade 10 French. So I’m afraid I can’t help.

  2. Ian Liberman
    Posted March 5, 2013 at 12:53 pm | Permalink

    This explains it. Ian

    Creator of Pressman`s Rock Trivia

    ________________________________

  3. Posted March 5, 2013 at 1:21 pm | Permalink

    I do speak and write french but alas , my English is very bad … However I will ask my daughter, who has a ph D in linguistics , is a professional interpretor and a passionate opponent of theistic hypocrites ( and if she has some spare time )if she wants to do this job

    Greetings

  4. pktom64
    Posted March 5, 2013 at 1:30 pm | Permalink

    The link is currently offline but here it is in PDF

    http://sir.sagepub.com/content/early/2013/01/15/0008429812469894.full.pdf

    • Posted March 5, 2013 at 1:37 pm | Permalink

      The PDF link gives a message: “This item requires a subscription to Studies in Religion/Sciences Religieuses.”

      • pktom64
        Posted March 5, 2013 at 2:48 pm | Permalink

        Weird, it’s working for me (Safari/Mac if that could make any difference).

  5. Posted March 5, 2013 at 1:36 pm | Permalink

    the link worked for me. The abstract at least was translated into English already: “The impact of Mother Teresa’s work has no religious or geographical boundaries. In the four parts of this text, we try to understand this phenomenon. We first present the method used to collect the available information and then discuss a few biographical considerations to clarify her mission and the media’s contribution to her popularity. The third part identifies four stumbling blocks on her way to canonization: her rather dogmatic religious views, her way of caring for the sick, her political choices, and her suspicious management of funds that she received. Fourth, we discuss some elements of her life related to beatification, including her “night of faith,” the exorcism to which she was subjected as well as the validity of the miracle attributed to her. In conclusion, we question why the criticism of which she has been the target has been ignored by the Vatican.”

    • Sastra
      Posted March 5, 2013 at 4:42 pm | Permalink

      blockquote>”In conclusion, we question why the criticism of which she has been the target has been ignored by the Vatican.”

      Yes indeed — that’s puzzling, isn’t it? You’d have thought the Vatican would have been swift to first promote awareness of the criticism and then discourage people around the world from always using “Mother Teresa” to represent 10 on a scale of 10 when evaluating moral worth. They are so quick to recognize errors and faults within the Church. The speculation in this section must be imaginative indeed. My own mind is boggled.

      • Dave
        Posted March 5, 2013 at 5:10 pm | Permalink

        Yes, self examination and criticism are known RCC strengths!

  6. Posted March 5, 2013 at 1:51 pm | Permalink

    I can do it, but it would take a lot of effort. If you can’t get anyone else to do it, let me know and I’ll dive in.

  7. KP
    Posted March 5, 2013 at 2:02 pm | Permalink

    Likewise, I can do it, too, but not by the end of the day, or even overnight. One reader said the PDF link required a sub.

    • KP
      Posted March 5, 2013 at 2:03 pm | Permalink

      Confirmed: Sub required.

  8. Christopher
    Posted March 5, 2013 at 2:22 pm | Permalink

    Can someone not use a document translator? Google Drive has one (apparently). support.google.com/drive/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=187189

    I don’t use it myself so I’m not sure about it.

  9. ladyatheist
    Posted March 5, 2013 at 3:08 pm | Permalink

    I’ll give it a go but it might take some time. It will make my grad school French proficiency translation exam good for something finally.

    • ladyatheist
      Posted March 5, 2013 at 3:23 pm | Permalink

      First paragraph (a little roughness here and there):

      When searching for documentation on the phenomenon of altruism within the framework of a seminary of ethics, one of us was struck by the life and work of Mother Teresa,who is one of the contemporary women most eulogized by the Catholic Church but also the most universally celebrated woman of our time for her missionary actions in the service of the underprivileged (Tucker, 2000. Her reputation is such that it is not rare to hear, relating to the most charitable person, that it is is the veritable Mother Teresa. Briefly, she henceforth is part of the collective imagination. Such unanimity, wherein doubt is not permitted, seems suspect to us. Within this context, the suggestion of Orwell (1949) has the effect that “saints ought always to be considered culpable until proved to the contrary.” (p. 85), seems pertinent to us. We have Studied (?) and will see shortly.

      • ladyatheist
        Posted March 5, 2013 at 3:25 pm | Permalink

        seminary could be “seminar” and “relating to the most charitable person” means she’s considered the most charitable person ever, I think.

        • NG
          Posted March 5, 2013 at 3:42 pm | Permalink

          It’s seminar.

          What they mean in the “il n’est pas rare d’entendre…” is that, in French, it has become a common expression to call someone “a Mother Teresa” to say that they are very charitable.

          Sorry, I won’t have time to translate the rest before some time. I hope someone else gets around it soon.

          • ladyatheist
            Posted March 5, 2013 at 6:19 pm | Permalink

            Thanks for clarifying that! I only know common expressions in arcane academic writing in my field and in 13th century poetry

        • ladyatheist
          Posted March 5, 2013 at 3:58 pm | Permalink

          2nd paragraph: The results of our inquiry enable us to understand the point of departure, then the expansion of this popularity all while evaluating the difference between the real person and the constructed personality of Mother Teresa. To do this, we will present first the method utilized in collecting the facts before mentioning some biographical elements concerning her personal life and her work. We will then show a certain number of problems which the Vatican has not taken into account in the process of beatification: a notably excessive dogmatism regarding abortion and divorce, her manner at least debatable of tending to the sick, her dubious political contacts and her curious management of the colossal sums of money she received. For the rest, we analyzed some surrounding elements of her beatification, among which her “night of the faith” (doubt?) and the validity of the miracle which has been attributed to her. In conclusion, we have questions the reasons which have given rise to such a unanimity regarding the sanctity of Mother Teresa.

  10. Posted March 5, 2013 at 3:53 pm | Permalink

    Content currently unavailable. I might be able to translate a bit of it (translation wouldn’t be very reliable though, as I’m not that great with french, although I can work with it so long as its written out).

  11. Posted March 5, 2013 at 4:25 pm | Permalink

    Picking fights with Mother Teresa? These guys better watch out.

  12. Nikos Apostolakis
    Posted March 5, 2013 at 4:39 pm | Permalink

    None of the links given so far work for me. They all require subscription.

  13. moimerlebleu
    Posted March 5, 2013 at 5:47 pm | Permalink

    Hi! I’d be happy to translate the article, if someone could provide it for free. Here’s my quick translation of the abstract:

    The impact of the work of Mother Theresa has no geographical or religious frontiers. In the four portions of his text, we attempt to understand this phenomenon. We first present the methods used to synthesize the available information, then we cover some biographical references which allow us to understand her mission and the media’s contribution to her popularity. The third part identifies the four stumbling blocks on the route to her canonization: her rather dogmatic religious opinions, her manner of caring for the sick, her political choices, and her suspicious managing of money she received. In the fourth point, we take up certain elements of her life relative to her beatification, such as her “night of the faith”, when she was the object of an exorcism, as well as the validity of the miracle which was attributed to her. In conclusion, we consider the reasons why the criticisms of her have been ignored by the Vatican.

    Please let me know if you would like me to translate the full work, I would enjoy it!

    • James
      Posted March 11, 2013 at 4:08 pm | Permalink

      I have a pdf file (in French) that I got from the author that I could provide.

  14. Nicolas Perrault
    Posted March 5, 2013 at 6:26 pm | Permalink

    My mother tongue is French. My English is not that good. I will do it if someone can correct my English.

  15. Posted March 5, 2013 at 9:10 pm | Permalink

    Didn’t Hitchens cover this in The Missionary Position?

    • josgeluk
      Posted March 6, 2013 at 1:03 am | Permalink

      Hitchens is in the bibliography.

  16. ladyatheist
    Posted March 5, 2013 at 9:57 pm | Permalink

    I skimmed over the first half (skipping over the “method” which seems silly for an article in the humanities) and here’s the gist (and Hitchens is quoted quite a bit):

    There’s basic biography, emphasizing that she heard Christ’s voice in some illness-induced delirium telling her to take care of the poorest of the poor. … A religious zealot who happened to work at the BBC called it a miracle when a new camera of theirs was able to film in the house of the dying, which was rather dark. He claimed it was the light of God. The cameraman claimed Kodak gets the credit.

    skim… skim… skim…. Her “care” of the sick is dubious: she required the nuns to drop everything to go to Mass, even if they were in the middle of taking care of a sick patient. Also, her hygiene standards were poor. She believed that pain and suffering were God’s way of bringing people closer to Christ, who suffered on the cross. Her “house of the dying” didn’t give pain-killers to the dying.

    She claimed to take care of the dying without regard to their religion, but she baptized 40,000 dying people.

    A project in the Bronx was shelved because she was against installing an elevator.

    The children in her orphanage were packed together and neglected.

    • John Scanlon, FCD
      Posted March 6, 2013 at 6:43 am | Permalink

      (skipping over the “method” which seems silly for an article in the humanities)

      It’s so cute when they try to be sciencey!

  17. Jerry Mc
    Posted March 6, 2013 at 5:27 am | Permalink

    I saved the PDF in french to my documents. Then opened it in Google translate. A few clicks of the mouse is all it takes.

    Jerry Mc

  18. nitpickette
    Posted March 6, 2013 at 6:36 am | Permalink

    I can also translate it (perhaps we could divide it into sections so no one person has a large workload?). Unfortunately, all the links provided in this thread are behind paywalls, including the docstock one. (I won’t have access to institutional databases again until the summer, but could tackle it then, if need be).

  19. james kirk
    Posted March 6, 2013 at 6:42 am | Permalink

    It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

    • darrelle
      Posted March 6, 2013 at 7:55 am | Permalink

      Nice sentiment. However, like most such sentiments it does not well survive contact with reality. And it does not pertain to MT at all.

      • Leon
        Posted March 6, 2013 at 9:03 am | Permalink

        Agreed. There are religious people and organizations who are out there fighting the good fight, but Mother Teresa was not one of them.


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