I’m in Hebrew!

I forgot that WEIT was being published in Hebrew—by an Israeli firm called Books in the Attic. At last my people will be able to read it in the original language through which Yahweh transmitted the book to me.

Here is the new cover (reversed, of course, because Hebrew is written right to left). I can’t read Hebrew (shame on me), but perhaps a literate reader can let me know if all is okay.

Picture 1

That makes 16 languages, and the next one (the one I’m most keen on) is Arabic!

31 Comments

  1. Griff
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 8:53 am | Permalink

    I think they’re in great need of evolution textbooks in Arabic – assuming they don’t get banned.

  2. John W. Loftus
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 8:56 am | Permalink

    This is awesome Jerry. You’re making a big difference. Wow!

  3. TJR
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 8:57 am | Permalink

    I’m sort of hoping that the title in Hebrew turns out to translate as “Yahweh Did It”.

  4. Dominic
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 8:59 am | Permalink

    I love the cover. May it sell well.

    Are you in Turkish? Pretty big audience for that too?

    • Alektorophile
      Posted February 20, 2013 at 12:12 pm | Permalink

      I like the cover, too. Paraceratherium, a gomphothere, and an elephant is my guess? As long as no evolutionary sequence is suggested.

      • Posted February 20, 2013 at 3:15 pm | Permalink

        A nice change from the usual – and much parodied – human sequence. Did you specifically veto that?

        • Posted February 20, 2013 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

          I guess it’s our zoocentricity, but plants always seem to be neglected in any discussion or illustration of evolution. Is there any plant sequence that would make the same point? E.G. leading to the banana.

  5. moleatthecounter
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 9:01 am | Permalink

    Yep, the text seems ok…

    “1. In the beginning Cat created the heavens and the earth and the Noms.

    2 Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of Cat was hovering over the waters, looking for catty treats.

    3. And Cat miaowed, “Let there be a cardboard box between the waters to separate waters from Catty Noms.”

    4. So Cat made the cardboard box and separated the water under the Catty Noms from the water above it. And it was so, like.

    Yes, Professor… It all seems in order.

  6. Chris Slaby
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 9:01 am | Permalink

    Very nice!

    Also, it seems as if your bio and photo will appear on the inside of the jacket after the cover. Usually, in the U.S. at least, author bio and photo appear on the inside of the jacket at the back of the book. I wonder if this is the standard publishing practice in Israel. Any informed readers know?

  7. Reginald Selkirk
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 9:04 am | Permalink

    FTR, my copy of WEIT is not in my attic, it is right there in my living room.

  8. Yonat
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 9:33 am | Permalink

    Looks very nice! The text on the back seems fine, with blurbs from Dawkins,Pinker and Shubin, In case you were wondering.
    Do you know who the translator was? I tried googling it but I guess the book is not out yet, so I couldn’t find it.

  9. Occam
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 9:40 am | Permalink

    “I said it in Hebrew — I said it in Dutch —
    I said it in German and Greek:
    But I wholly forgot (and it vexes me much)
    That English is what you speak!”

  10. JBlilie
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 9:44 am | Permalink

    Very cool, the more the merrier!

  11. Posted February 20, 2013 at 10:05 am | Permalink

    It is interesting to see hos capricious god was. Reveals to the good prof the idea of the book in Hebrew and then forgets to teach our good teacher Hebrew, how sad :(

  12. gravityfly
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 10:33 am | Permalink

    “At last my people will be able to read it in the original language through which Yahweh transmitted the book to me.” LOL!

    • BigBob
      Posted February 20, 2013 at 12:12 pm | Permalink

      Bwahahahahahaaaaaaaaaa.
      Priceless.

    • Hempenstein
      Posted February 20, 2013 at 10:02 pm | Permalink

      Yeah, if they go to their attic. Oy!

  13. Jim Cliborn
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 10:40 am | Permalink

    Good job, keep it up! Will it ever be translated into Texan?

    • Diane G.
      Posted February 20, 2013 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

      Ha Ha Ha!

  14. Anita
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 12:11 pm | Permalink

    Kol ha kavod!!!

  15. Posted February 20, 2013 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

    I misread it as “Hebron” (Ohio). Then I figured it was a joke/play on words. Congratulations on the translation.

    Don’t carry guilt (the gift that keeps on giving!!!) about not knowing your ancestral language. I speak Californian English, and have difficulty speaking ancestral/current Scottish English (never mind Gaelic). My faux-Scots accent (for MacGregor jokes, etc) invariably results in a Irish/Cockney/Oz mashup w’ a wee bi’ o’ Scuts favor.

    Scott Near Berkeley (thanks WordPress, messin’ me ID!!!)

  16. Michael
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 12:32 pm | Permalink

    Oh, and מזל טוב (mazal tov)!

  17. R.W.
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 8:34 pm | Permalink

    Wow, this is great. Now I finally have something with which to pass the time in synagogue on Yom Kippur without arousing any suspicions.

  18. Posted February 20, 2013 at 10:00 pm | Permalink

    Sixteen published translations for WEIT and still counting — Outstanding!

    I’m thinking the next pinnacle of success for WEIT will be a published translation in Sophisticated Theobabble; then perhaps even sophisticated theologians will be able to finally get a clue. (I grant preparing such a translation might prove to be a tediously difficult challenge — but I imagine it would sure be fun to read!)

    • infiniteimprobabilit
      Posted February 21, 2013 at 1:41 am | Permalink

      The challenge would be finding equivalent expressions in theobabble for almost all scientific terminology. It can be done, with some difficulty – I imagine the result might be something like this .

      • Diane G.
        Posted February 22, 2013 at 3:39 pm | Permalink

        Ha, ha, that’s a good one. Hadn’t seen it before!

  19. Mark Joseph
    Posted February 20, 2013 at 10:11 pm | Permalink

    Congratulations, Jerry!

  20. Howard Kornstein
    Posted February 21, 2013 at 5:22 am | Permalink

    It astounds me that I have retained the ability to still read Hebrew after all these years. It is really an excellent translation Jerry. I am also impressed with the fact that you bothered to point out in the text that animal life continued to evolve during the period travelled aboard Noah’s ark.

  21. Bobbie Harley
    Posted February 22, 2013 at 2:22 pm | Permalink

    Yep, it’s right. Lema (why) Ha’evolutzia (you guessed it — didn’t know she was a female, did you?) nivonah (actually a better word than “true”; it means “right” or “correct.”) Bobbie Harley (bilcha bat benjamin)(Barbara Harley MD)

  22. Bobbie Harley
    Posted February 22, 2013 at 2:23 pm | Permalink

    P.S. don’t wish for Arabic. Poor publisher ‘ll be burned alive! BH

  23. Posted March 2, 2013 at 3:42 pm | Permalink

    Finally!!!!

    I already read your excellent book, and even translated a few chapters to hebrew.


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