Geek humor

image 174

A bit depressing, too. . .

h/t: Grania

30 Comments

  1. gbjames
    Posted February 18, 2013 at 1:30 pm | Permalink

    :)

  2. Heber
    Posted February 18, 2013 at 1:32 pm | Permalink

    I saw this on RD’s Facebook page but didn’t get it :/ Can someone explain?

    • Posted February 18, 2013 at 2:20 pm | Permalink

      p53 is a protein that suppresses unnecessary cell division. I assume the ‘point mutation’ rendered that protein unable to function. Thus, the mouse is at a high risk of developing cancer.

      • Christopher
        Posted February 18, 2013 at 8:14 pm | Permalink

        Wasn’t the p53 gene implicated in lung cancer and tobacco users or is it with cancers in general?

      • salahhe
        Posted February 19, 2013 at 6:19 am | Permalink

        I don’t see how this is funny

  3. Posted February 18, 2013 at 1:56 pm | Permalink

    Booo! :-)

  4. Bruce S. Springsteen
    Posted February 18, 2013 at 2:01 pm | Permalink

    Could be worse. He could have human ear cartilage growing on his back.

  5. Sigmund
    Posted February 18, 2013 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

    I get the p53 part.
    But where does the ‘transgenic’ bit come in?
    Transgenic usually means the transfer of genetic information from one species to another. There are transgenic mice, such as those engineered to express a human gene, and there are knockout mice – those that are engineered to have a mutation rendering one of their normal genes non-functional.
    The p53 mouse seems to be the latter rather than the former.
    It’s knockouts anonymous!
    That’s the trouble with geeky jokes – us geeks tend to be pedantic!

    • whyevolutionistrue
      Posted February 18, 2013 at 2:52 pm | Permalink

      Couldn’t they have put in a transgene that also had a mutation in a specific place?

      • Sigmund
        Posted February 18, 2013 at 3:15 pm | Permalink

        The usual ‘mutated’ genes you see in these types of mice have an exon removed such that the open reading frame is disrupted.
        I guess you could put in a transgene that contained a full open reading frame of, say, human P53, with a point mutation – perhaps testing a dominant negative phenotype.
        So technically speaking, it could fit.
        (Although I still think they are mixing up the term ‘transgenic’, with the currently more common term ‘knockout’)

        • steve oberski
          Posted February 18, 2013 at 3:40 pm | Permalink

          At which point the original joke has quite thoroughly been beaten to death.

          • Dave
            Posted February 18, 2013 at 4:46 pm | Permalink

            What joke?

        • gillt
          Posted February 18, 2013 at 5:44 pm | Permalink

          FYI: The first transgenic mouse was a p53 mutant. By transgenic, I think we’re supposed to assume a knock-in “humanized” mouse model, in that they have a human version of the p53 gene, which has a point mutation somewhere, either rendering the gene nonfunctional, partially functional or over-expressed. Technically speaking I would not consider knock-outs to be transgenic.

        • Simon Hayward
          Posted February 18, 2013 at 8:18 pm | Permalink

          “transgenic, knock-in, knock-out, humanized, inducible, suppressible, conditional anonymous” rather loses the punch – a bit like this thread. Give the guy a little license.

      • Posted February 18, 2013 at 9:03 pm | Permalink

        I can’t think of any other website where I can learn so much from a LOLz thread.

  6. Filippo
    Posted February 18, 2013 at 5:48 pm | Permalink

    Whqt would be a representative example of a NON-geek joke?

    Would it be like the old 50’s/60’s Bill Cosby routine of a football player and the kid throwing the football before the football player plugs the Brylcreamesque (sp.?) stuff:

    Football player to kid: “Throw it to me, the ball. Pick it up first.”

    What affirmative noun name is synonymous with “non-geek”? What is a “non-geek”? Is it a “jock”? (A hedge fund manager?) Is a “geek” a “non-jock”?

    • Posted February 18, 2013 at 6:19 pm | Permalink

      I have come to the conclusion that anyone who pursues a hobby or passion to a high level, and is willing to be publicly enthusiastic about it, can be considered a geek. Computer geek, band geek, bike geek, fashion geek, knitting geek. Whatever. The only place it doesn’t seem to apply is team sports – hence the “jock” stereotype, I guess. Nevertheless, if you listen to people who are really into, say, American football talking about American football, there’s no other way to describe it. They’re football geeks.

      The noun synonymous with “non-geek” is “normal”. It follows that normal people are boring.

      • Posted February 18, 2013 at 9:58 pm | Permalink

        An astute assessment.

      • salahhe
        Posted February 19, 2013 at 6:21 am | Permalink

        Have you seen any normal people?

  7. Posted February 18, 2013 at 8:16 pm | Permalink

    I thought it said “Greek humor” and expected anything from austerity to the ElgParthenon marbles to baklava.

  8. Posted February 18, 2013 at 8:17 pm | Permalink

    So <s> … </s> does not activate strikeout here. We learn something every day.

    • JohnnieCanuck
      Posted February 19, 2013 at 12:45 am | Permalink

      This is probably going to be postmarked for the 18th, so that’s two days in a row that you’ve got covered.

      use del or strike to do the job, I hope.

      • JohnnieCanuck
        Posted February 19, 2013 at 12:46 am | Permalink

        18th</del 19th, actually.

      • Posted February 19, 2013 at 12:48 am | Permalink

        You mean del or strike ?
        (<del>del<del> etc)

        • Posted February 19, 2013 at 12:52 am | Permalink

          I mean …</del>

          • JohnnieCanuck
            Posted February 19, 2013 at 2:10 pm | Permalink

            See, it’s contagious. I was laughing at myself too much to continue trying.

  9. gravelinspector-Aidan
    Posted February 19, 2013 at 4:32 am | Permalink

    What happened to the “Ancient (?) cat tracks”?
    I was looking forward to a bit of feline ichnology.

    • Posted February 19, 2013 at 1:41 pm | Permalink

      They are now here. My email notification also included some quoted Icelandic/Gaelic/Early English poetry that I’d be curious to know more about.

      • gravelinspector-Aidan
        Posted February 19, 2013 at 3:06 pm | Permalink

        I’ll see if I can retrieve it from the bin. [...] Oh yes, so there was. I didn’t look down far enough. I find WEIT interesting enough to just come into it and work my way through it on general principles without worrying over much about the content of each update mail.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 27,733 other followers

%d bloggers like this: